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June 16, 1944 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1944

Students To Be.
Given Awards -
In Mathematics'
John R. Stock, '46E, and Lynn G.
Albers, Grad., will receive the first
awards from the Edwin Wilkinson
Miller Fund for students in the
mathematics department, it was an-
nounced yesterday.
Given to recognize outstanding
scholarship, the award consists of an
advanced mathematical work, selec-
ted to suit the tastes of the student.
The annual award is made to stu-
dents in undergraduate engineering
mathematics courses and to graduate
mathematics students and was estab-
lished in memory of the late Prof.
Edwin W. Miller of the mathematics
department. The fund is made up
of contributions from former friends,
faculty colleagues and alumni.,
Prof. Miller had attracted interna-
tional attention with his research
publications. He received his Ph.D.
here in 1930 and was a member of
the mathematics department staff
until his death in 1942.
BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Rented,
Repaired.
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0.D. MORRILL
314 South State St.

..........1944
Clerk of the City or Township of ..................., Michigan
Being in the armed forces of the United States and desiring to
vote in the coming election, I hereby apply for an official war ballot.
My home address is .................................. in the
city, town or village of .............................. in the county
of Michigan.
I desire that the ballot be sent to me at the following address:

Jury Selection
Still Pending
Little Sign of Headway
Seen in Graft Trial
MASON, MICH., June 15- (AP)-
The tedious task of selecting a jury
to try 23 defendants named in a Leg-
islative Graft Conspiracy warrant
dragged through its fourth day in
the Ingham County Circuit court
today with little sign of real head-
way.
Of the first panels of 160 prospect-
ive jurors, 13 were seated tentatively
in the jury box at the close of to-
day's session of court; all the rest
but two had been excused, and only
25 of the 230 peremptory challenges
allowed the prosecution and defense
had been used. The defense ex-
pended 16 of its 15 challenges,- th(
prosecution nine.
A special panel of 100 prospective
jurors is to report to the court to-
morrow.
The defendants are accused of
conspiracy to corrupt the Legislature
through the passing of bribes.

(ONFERENCES CITED:

Peace Plans Progress in Capitol

(Signed) .........................................
NOTE: Whether you are registered or not you are eligible to receive a ballot and
..vote if you attain the age of 21 on or before November 7th, 1944..........
CLIP THIS APPLICATION BLANK FOR ABSENTEE BALLOTING--
This clipping is a replica of the application card each serviceman must
fill in to vote in the coming election. Absentee voters will receive
Michigan ballots when this card is filed with their county clerk.
Either this clipping or an application blank obtainable at the county
clerk's office or from Local 38 (UAW-CIO), 208 W. Washington, may
be used.
TIME TABLE CAUSE:
Company G Storms Castle
At Monte Cave in Alban Hills

By The Washington Staff of
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, June 15.- --There
is great hope in official Washington
that real progress is being made
toward an enduring peace after the
war;
President Roosevelt recently said
that we now are much farther along
with planning than we were at the
same time during the past war. He
cited the Teheran. Moscow and Cairo
conferences, the food conferences,
the UNRRA agreement and the
forthcoming world monetary confer-
ence.
Hull's Agreement
A strong contributing factor to this
hope naturally is Secretary Hull's
agreement with Senate leaders on
general principles for a post-war
world organizatio# to keep the peace,
and the invitation to Russia, China
and Britain to discuss it. This step
was designed to avoid the error made
by the Wilson Administration in
World War I when failure to nail
down Senate support first reacted
unfavorably upon Wilson's position
later.
Although reckoned by many ob-

servers as the most conservative in
international affairs of the great
powers, the U.S. now has psychologi-
cal approaches to China, Britain and
Russia for post-war settlements
which they appear to lack among
themselves and which America might
not enjoy after the war.
.Diplomacy Snail-Paced
Diplomacy appears snail-paced,
but its task now is enormous. At
present Secretary Hull seeks to com-
mit this Government to principles
only, but he is going ahead on that
basis before the war ends. Details of

the design may
until much later.

GOP Problem- Republicans are
looking around for a middle-of-the-
road chairman for their convention
resolutions committee to avoid tag-
ging their platform in advance as
"isolationist" or "internationalist."
The group may face warm sessions
when it meets a week before the
June 26 convention, as it includes
members of such divergent views as
Rep. Clare Luce of Connecticut, Sen-
ators Taft of Ohio, Danaher of Con-
necticut, Austin of Vermont and
Brooks of Illinois.

not become clear

_____MRRILYN SHOPPE
'COVL ter
Our selection of frocks for Sum-
mer - every conceivable coo

. ffq

By KENNETH L. DIXON
Associated Press Correspondent
WITH THE AEF IN ITALY, June
15.-Except for a. three hour differ-
ence in the German and American
armies' time table, men of Company
G never would have stormed the
castle at Monte Cave here high in the
Alban Hills.
But they had to do it and they
scaled this rock wall which defied

t4 9amwu4 4i--A
at ANN ARBOR'S MOST FAMOUS RESTAURANT

modern warfare's mortars and ba-
zookas, going over the emplacements
on one another's shoulders like
knights of old, yelling and shouting
and shooting into the smoke.
And they took the castle mirac-
ulously, without a casualty, while
killing more than half of those in-
side and capturing the rest.
It was just before 6 o'clock in the
evening when the batallion surround-
ed the stone castle, about 125 yards
long, 100 yards wide and three stories
high. Nazi riflemen, machine gun-
ners and machine pistol experts cut
loose at them from the four huge
blockhouses on the corners and from
the slits in the stone.
Inside were about 70 Germans.
The battalion had to capture the
castle and move on over the moun-
tain-Hill 949 the military maps call-
ed it-to keep from exposing the
flanks of their advancing comrades
on both sides.
They made their plan for storm-
ing the castle, got the mortar com-
pany ready to throw down a pre-
liminary barrage and men of Com-
pany G moved through the trees up
as close as possible.
But Company G was willing to give
the Germans a chance. Up to within
75 yards of the castle crawled Pfc.
Herman J. Kemmer, 20, of Buffalo,
N.Y., who was born in Germany.
"Come on out and surrender," he
called in German. "We have you
surrounded. We will give you a free
ride back to America. It's nice over
there. Otherwise we will fire on the
castle."
In perfect English a voice replied:
"Sorry, but we have 6rders to hold
this castle until 9 o'clock. You
know the army. We can't do it.
Sorry."
Company G was sorry too, but they
had their orders and they knew the
army, too. They signaled to Lt. James
F. Strader, 22, of Amarillo, Tex., the
forward observer for the mortar com-
pany, and he started calling the shots
in the castle positions.
From 6 until 7 o'clock the mortar
men laid down more than 400 rounds
on everything that moved in the
castle. They did it in three separate
barrages and between each barrage
Kemmer again called out to the Ger-
mans inside to surrender. Each time
the answer was the same. Each time
it was accompanied by bursts of
machine gun fire from the castle
windows.
Bazookas dented the stone walls
and the mortars obviously weren't
going to do the job alone. So Captain
Matney called the men of Company
G to scale the walls and storm the
castle.

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Have one of their FAMOUS DISHES - BROILED
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