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June 16, 1944 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-16

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FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1944

TUT 1V leHIrf_' -A V TI A TT V

sAno nPulm"

A. T~x AI MIV A I T A l f I. A x~

r-AUJS TIMEE

Ann Arbor High
School Grants
280 Diplomas
Some 280 Ann Arbor High School
graduates received diplomas at com-
mnencement exercises at Hill Audi-
torium at 8 p.m. yesterday.
Rev. C. H. Loucks, pastor of the
First Baptist Church, conducted the
invocation. Hon. George A. Malcolm,
an Ann Arbor High School graduate
of 100, delivered the commencement
address.
The high school orchestra, under
the direction of Miss Elizabeth Green,
played the processional and music
from Haydn's "Symphony in D
major."
The high school a cappella choir,'
under the direction of Miss Rose
Grentzer, sang two selections. The
class memorial was read by Rae Kel-
ler, class president, and was accepted
by George Sidwell, president of the
board of education.
The graduates sang their class song,
which was conducted by Ben Wheat-3
ley, composer. I

SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS:
Hillel Foundation Receives
Total of $625 in Donations

Funds totalling $625 have been do-
nated to the Michigan chapter of
B'nai Brith Hillet Foundation for
student work, director and hostess
scholarships for the school year of
1944-45, Rabbi Jehudah M. Cohen
announced today.
The Pisgah Auxiliary of the B'nai
Brith in Detroit, donors of previous
scholarships during the past seme-
ster are providing for one hostess
scholarship, one work scholarship,
each worth $150 and a student di-
rector scholarship valued at $250.
All three extend over the two-seme-
ster period commencing this fall.
Work Scholarship
Another work scholarship, good for
only the fall semester's duration and
worth $75, is being donated by the
Louis Marshall Auxiliary.
Hillel hostesses are paid at. a rate
of sixty-cents an hour, student di-
rectors receive seventy-five cents an
hour, and those with work scholar-

ships are paid seventy cents an hour.
Applications for all scholarships
should be submitted immediately and
written forms can be obtained at the
Hillel Foundation from Esther Ler-
ner, the secretary.
Winners Notiled
Winners of the scholarships will be
informed of the fact by mail in Aug-
ust after being selected by the schol-
arship committee of the B'nai Brith
Women's Auxiliary, District Six, Chi-
cago. The . Marshall work scholar-
ship of 75 dollars will be awarded as
a second prize, first prize being the
more valuable two-semester Pisgah
work scholarship.
Hillel hostesses work about eight
hours each week, student directors,
ten hours, and those receiving work
scholarships will do clerical and me-
nial tasks for approximately seven
hours a week. Students may apply
for more than one scholarship but
only women will be chosen for the
hostess scholarship.
Enrollment Doubles
With an enrollment about twice as
large as last year, the four-week
Intersession is being attended by
students from fifteen different states,
according to Dean James B. Edmon-
son, They are taking courses in re-
habilitation and counseling of re-
turning war veterans.
It is expected that a large number
of students will remain after the
Intersession closes, June 30, to attend
the summer session.

Truman Hires
Graduate of U'
Fulton, '30, Works
On Senate Committee
A former University man, Hugh
Fulton, '30, J. D. '31, is chief counsel
of the Truman Committee and the
man who is responsible for the fiery
cross examinations during Truman
Committee public hearings.
The committee has charge of in-
vestigations into the thousands of
complaints about delays, loopholes
and scandals in the defense pro-
gram sent it by irate citizens.
When Fulton was asked recently
if the work he does is exciting he
responded, "The committee work in-
volves every industry and government
agency and it's the Senate's and
public's spotlight and microphone on
vital and necessary information
about the war effort.
Fulton, since he was appointed in
1942 by Senator Truman, probably
holds the position in Washington
which entails the longest hours of
work.
While at the University he was a
member of the Sigma Delta Kappa,
Phi Beta Kappa, and was on the
Board of Editors of the Michigan
Law Review.
Strikes Set Record
LANSING, June 15.-(/)-The State
Labor Mediation Board reported to-
day that for the second successive
month, industrial strikes in Michi-
gan set a new record during May.

Peruvian Urges
More Cultural
Cooperation
The government of Peru must
make a great effort to send supplies
-such as selections of Peruvian art
and literature-to the. United States
so that people here may know Peru
better, according to Senor Emilio
Harth-Terre, Peruvian architect and
guest of the State Department.
In an interview following a speech
given yesterday at the Rackham
Building, Senor Harth-Terre said
that the library here, for instance,
has very little that is representative
of Peru. "But," he added, "the fault
is with Peru for not having sent
more."
He stated that the people in Peru
have great respect and admiration
for the United States, that they are
doing all they can to help the war
effort and have high hopes for an
Allied victory.
In his lecture on Colonial Art in
Peru Senor Harth-Terre pointed out
that during the sixteenth century art
and architecture in Peru was largely
imitative; it followed the old Spanish
traditions. After the transitional
seventeenth century Peruvian art
came into its own in the eighteenth
century.
Senor Harth-Terre is a founding
member of the National Council for
the Preservation and Restoration of
Historical Monuments in Peru, and
has charge of the plans for the new
national library to be built in Lima.
BUY WAR BONDS
INVEST IN VICTORY

50 MEMBERS EXPECTED:
Chinese Fraternity To Hold
National Convention Here

Alpha Lambda, international Chi-'
nese fraternity, will hold its annual
national convention here June 24, 25
and 26.
Between 40 and 50 members of the
organization are expected to attend
the meetings.
Meeting at Rackham
In addition to the business meet-
ings, which will be held in the Rack-
ham Building, several social func-
tions have been planned. A reception
to greet the out of town members will
be held June 24 in the Rackham
Building.
The following day the group will
hold a picnic at the home of Dr. W.
Carl Rufus of the department of

astronomy. A banquet at the Wash-
tenaw Golf Club has been planned
for the final day of the convention.
200 Members
There are now about 200 members
of the fraternity in the United States
and about 100 members in China.
The Board of Central Officers is
located this year in Ann Arbor. Gen-
eral secretary is John Fung, a medi-
cal student here; corresponding sec-
retary is Normon Lee, a former engi-
neering student who is now working
in Detroit; financial secretary is A.T.
Kiang, a former student here now
working as a research assistant in
the physics department; editor in
chief of the Alpha Lambda Bulletin
is Dr. Tien.

For I N DIV IDUAL IZ E D
2FtSORAGE
217 East Liberty St.

Re/ax te ore AnatC!
DANCE
°°°to the Music of
BILL
IAIR-CONDITION ED
MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM
FRIDAY NIGHT ONLY

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4V

DAILY OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

Be dressed in a flattering swim suit to meet that
other person. We have just the suit for you!

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FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1944
VOL. LIV No. 162
All notices for The Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.
Notices
PLANS FOR COMMENCEMENT
Commencement- Saturday, June
24, 1944, 2:30 p.m.
Weather Fair
Time of Assembly-1:40 p.m. (ex-
cept noted).
Places of Assembly:
Members of the Faculties at 1:45
p.m. in Angell Hall, Rm. 1223, Rhet-
oric Library, where they may robe.
Regents, Ex-Regents, and Deans at
1:45 p.m. in Angell Hall, Rm. 1011,
the Regents' Room.
Students of the various schools and
colleges, as follows:
Literature, Science and the Arts
on Main Diagonal, walk between
Library and Engineering Buildings.
Educaton on walk in front of
Physiology & Pharmacology Build-
ing.
Engineering on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Court.

SWIm SUITS

UNIVERSITY
GRILL
615 East William
3rd Door from State
Reservations
Now Being Taken
for
Commencement Day

Architecture on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Arch (behind
Engineers).
Nurses on diagonal walk between
Chemistry Building and Library.
Law on East and West walk, west
of the intersection in front of
Library.
Pharmacy on East and West
walk, west of the intersection in
front of Library (behind Law).
Dental Surgery on North and
South walk between Library and
Natural Science Building.
Business Administration on walk
north side of Physiology and Phar
macology Building.
Forestry and Conservation on
walk north side of Physiology and
Pharmacology Building (behind
Bus. Ad.)
Music on main diagonal walk
from Library to Natural Science
Building, north of Library.
Public Health on main diagonal
walk from Library to Natural Sci-
ence Building (behind Music).
Graduate on main diagonal walk
near Natural Science Building.
Color Guard and Honor Guard
and Band in front of main Library.
Line of March-Library to South
University to State Street to North
University to Hill Auditorium.
Weather Rainy
The sounding of the University
Power House Siren at 1:30 p.m. will
indicate that the march to Hill Audi-
torium has been abandoned.
Students will proceed directly to
Hill Auditorium and enter through
one of the three main center doors.
(Doors open at 2 p.m.)
Members of the Faculties will as-
semble in the second floor dressing
rooms and take their places on the
platform in the Auditorium.
Regents, Ex-Regents, Deans and
other participating officials will as-
semble in the first floor dressing
rooms of Hill Auditorium.
School of Education Faculty: The
June meeting of the faculty will be
held on Monday, June 19, in the
University Elementary School Li-
brary. The meeting will convene at
4:15 p.m.
Graduating Seniors-College of L.
S. & A, Schools of Education, Music,
Public Health: Seniors who receive
grades of I or X at the close of the
present Spring Term must have the
make-up grades reported to the Reg-
istrar's office, Room 4, University
Hall, not later than Monday noon,
June 26, in order to insure recom-
mendation to the Board of Regents
for degrees with the June class.
Robert L. Williams,
Assistant Registrar.
Gradvuating Seniors registered with
the Bureau of Appointments, in the
General Division, please stop in and
give us your change of address and
plans for the summer. Bureau of
Appointments, 201 Mason Hall.
Automobile Regulation: The Uni-
versity Automobile Regulation will
be lifted in accordance with the fol-
lowing schedule:
Architecture, Friday, June 23, 5 p.m.
Bus. Ad.. Saturday, June 23, 12 Noon

FI

vx
Did you remember
tosend our dad a
Father's Day Card?
FATHER'S DAY CARDS

ireefing Cards of Every

Description

Dentist, Dental Hygiene (Seniors)
.....Saturday, June 17, 12 Noon
Dentistry, Dental Hygiene (All oth-
ers) ......Friday, June 23, 5 p.m.
Education ..Friday, June 23, 5 p.m.
Engineering, Friday, June 23, 5 p.m.
(Continued on Page 4)

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