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June 02, 1944 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

'RlI?1i, Y. 2. 1944

aH I T W N f A IV-....%...a...~ ~ .U...S RIA Th~~1O&',S.'

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Irteritionl
Center Attracts
Students at 'U'
One of the unique features of the
University is the International Cen-
ter where representatives of 54 na-
tions gather to exchange opinions
and make friends With American stu-
dents and other foreign students.
There are naw over 450 foreign stu-
dents on campus and this number is
expected to reach much higher pro-
portions after the war. The Turkish
group =with from 50 to 60it students
nou has the largest number of stu-
dents from a single country. The
number of Latin-American students
is between 125 and 150 and includes
representatives of all 21 of the sister
republics.
China Represented
hlina too, is well represented with
many more students scheduled to
come as soon as tihey can find trans-
portation. At the present there are
aso students here from Iran, India
and Nigeria.
These students gather at the Cen-
ter on Sunday evenings for a discus-
si kn or music program and the
"snack hour" which follows the pro-
. ram:.
r International Center teas on
Thursday afternoons are popular with
both foreign and American students
at the University. Here people of
many varied cultures gather infor-
mally over a cup of tea. Sometimes
the foreign students can be heard
speaking their native languages, but
more usually the common American
tongue is used.
Entertainment Sponsored
In addition, groups of the students
put on .their own entertainment-
dances at which they may present
some of their native folk songs or
dances, receptions and inforial pro-
grams.

Library 4lqrks
Popular Spot
On ' Campus
25,000 New Books
Added Yearly Through
Purghase, Exchange
Girls in gay summer dresses and
men in kahki and navy blue and ci-
vilian dress daily pass through the
portals of the General Library, the
center of .campus.
The library, built in 1917-19 at a
cost of $615,000, houses the many
divisions and subdivisions corres-
ponding in a general way to the
schools and colleges comprising the
University.
Maintained by Regents
The library is maintained by the
$oard of Regents, which provides for
services, supplies, and purchases of
test books and periodicals. Approxi-
mat ly 25,000 volumes are added an-
nually through purchase, gift, and
exchange.

GENERAL LIBRARY-The University's General Lirrary houses sev-
eral thousand hooks, which are so arranged that students from all col-
leges will find their outside reading ,books there.

Students T o Be
Offered List
Scholarships
The University offers freshmen
students aid in the form of List
Scholarships, which are granted to
graduating seniors of University Ac-
credited Michigan State high
schools.
List Scholarships carry with them
a stipend equivalent to semester
fees for the freshman year, and are
renewable through s~ophomore, Jun-
ior and Senior years.
Application procedure directions
and forms may be obtained from the
principle o-f any accredited high
schools.
These awards are granted on the,
basis of the student's high school
academic rating; recommendations
from the principle; letters of refer-
ence; the student's interest and ci-
tizenship ability; scores made on
scholastic apptitude and achieve-
ment tents given y the University;
evaluation of the student by the lo-
cal UTniversity Arluninzi Club, as well
as the applicant's health and general
stability.
In addition to these scholarships
there are a limited number of schol-
arships available to entering fresh-
men men, "preferably Michigan resi-
dents", provided for by the Rackham
Fund.

Michigan's University Hospital, a
small city practically complete in it-
self, can boast of being one of the
largest in the country, and at the
last estimate, had some 1100 beds.
A unique feature of the huge
building is a varying number of stor-
ies, depending upon the vantage
point. Six stories belong to the
building proper, but nine stories are
visible from the north side and ten
are discerjiible oin th e edcge o f Slr.e [7'y
Hollow", the Huron River Valley.
The hospital roof condtins : well-
equipped children's playground, and
an architectural arrangement in this
monumental concrete and limestone
strocture makes every room L.n out-
side rom, insiuring plenty of lighlt
and air for p.tients apd easy ucces-
ibility.
EnCyCil3edits Nightmare
Statistics on the bilding itself
furnish enovugh material for an en-
cyclopedist's nightmare. COnstruC-
tion, which was prqlqnged from 1920
to 1925 because of legislative tie-ups,

involved the use of more than three
million bricks, 37,800 cubic yards of
concrete and limestone and more
than 1200 tons of reenforcing steel
at an original total cost of almost
four million dollars. At the time of
tie Hospital's completion, one news-
paper reached the startling conclu-
sion that the 2,684 windows com-
1 posed of 60 tons of glass would keep
a crew of ten window washers busy
constantly.
Designed by architect Albert Kahn
of lDetroit, the foundation was
planned to support four stories in
addition to the original six, and sev-
eral additions have been made sub-
;equently. in 1931 two additional
floors for care and treatment of pul-
monary diseases were added, and in
1938 constructions of additions cost-
ing $200,000 were undertaken.
A new intern's residence, consist-
ing of three floors and a ground
floor, was designed to house 90 in-
terns, resident physicians and phar-
macists.

CITY IN ITSELF:
'U' Hospital Boasts of Being
One of the Largest in Country

The books are classified according
to a modified Dewey Decimal Sys-
tem, and whenever possible the Li-
brary of Congress catalog cards are
obtained for the library card cata=
logs.
Library Hours
Monday through Saturday the li-
brary is open from 7:45 a. m. to

10:00 p. m. Sunday the Main Read-
ing Room and the Periodicals Room
are open from 2:00 to 9:00 p. m.
The library has a number of spe-
cial rooms. To the right of the
main entrance is the Study Hall,
where assigned readings for most
large undergraduate courses are on
reserve.

SOLDIERS STUDY:
I' Extension Service Offers
r Correspondence Courses

Michigan High School Forensic As-
sociation. The association sponsors
debating and extemporaneous speak-
ing contests on political and econ-
omic problems in high schools of the
state. Last year 230 high schools in
the state participated.

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gi4i~9 Plea

V}.

University of Michigan men in the
armed services with idle time on
their hands, who are anxious to keep
their University contact or possibly
gain a few hours of advanced credit,
have turned to correspondence
courses supervised by the University
Extension Service, Dr. Charles A.
Fisher, head of the service, said.
Although the principle function of
the service has been to bring a portion

" _ -- - I

of the activities carried on in the
University to residents of the state,
correspondence courses have been a
principle contribution to the war ef-
fort. American prisoners of war
studying correspondence courses have
converted concentration camps into
"Universities behind barbed wire."
Of the 1,857 students studying cor-
respondence courses provided by the
service last year, more than half were
in the armed forces, Dr. Fisher said.
Another contribution to the war
effort by the service is discussion
groups, to prepare leaders and or-
ganizers for groups to speak on the
war and post-war problems. The
service also holds conferences for
war workers, fire fighters and per-
sons interested in adult education.
While the student newly-entering
the University may not be directly
affected by the service, it represents
his University to the state as a whole
and the chances are great that the
student will have some contact with
the department after graduation.
The incoming student may have
had contact with ExtensionService
while still in high school through the

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