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April 16, 1944 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAE rWO

THiE MiCHIGAN DAILY

SUNDY, IRL1t), 1i44

.

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE:
General Simmons To Speak
To Health, Medical Students

Experiences of
Jap Pisoners
To Be Related

T WO Music
Sororities Tjg
Pr eiset Sow

Prof. Soule To
Describ Trip

Gen. James S. Simmons of the Ar-
my Medical Corps will address an as-
sembly of public health and medicalt
students at 11 a.m. Wednesday in
the School of Public Health Audi-
torium on the subject of "Preventivel
Medicine in Military Practice."+
This address by Gen. Simmons, who
is chief of the Preventive Medicine
Division of the Office of the Surgeon
General of the U.S. Army, will be thei
third in a series of five dedicatory
lectures. The first address was given
in November by Dr. Thomas Parran,
Surgeon General of the U.S. Army,
and the second in March by Dr. Ha-
ven Emerson of the College of Physi-
cians and Surgeons in New York City.
Gen. Simmons, a native of Northa
Carolina, has' charge of the health
and disease prevention services for

I
t i
l
ff#
I'
t
Ia

Aa q.Latin A *er'a T o Be
United States troops in all -parts of . Lett T B Red Members of Sigma Alpha Iota and Subjet' of Discussion
the world. He receeived his medical ME S BeReadMu Phi Epsilon, honorary musical
degree from the University of Penn- At Canterbury Club sororities, will collaborate in pre- Prof. Malcolm Soule of the depart-
sylvania in 1915 and a doctorate in Gatherino Tonight senting "Victory Musicale" at 8:30 ment of bacteriology will speak on his
public health from Harvard in 1929. TeFriday in the Lydia endelsshnrecent trip to Latin America at 7:30
A member of the Army Medical Letters telling the experiences of The musicale is being given to aid p.m. tomorrow at the International
Corps in 1916, he served as director internees and prisoners of war in in the sale of war bonds and stampsI Center.
of laboratory services at a number Japanese camps in the Philippines and the project originated with the A short time ago Prof. Soule, un-
of stations in Texas and organized will be read at a meeting of the national organizations of the sorori- der the sponsorship of the Office of
Overseas Laboratory Service No. 9 Canterbury Club at 6 p.m. today in ties. Similar musicales have been the Coordinator of Inter-American
during the first World War. After the St. Andrew's Episcopal Church. given in all college towns where AhfCr intto onthsmi an
war, Gen. Simmons was chief of lab- Miss Maxine Westphal, counselor active chapters of the two sororities , sp
oratory service at the Walter Reed for women students at the church exist. American countries.
oratoryiserviceThenpurposetofais tripcwasetwo
Hospital, Washington, and later serv- I Comprised entirely of modern The purpose of his trip was two-
ed in Hawaii and at the Army Medi- has received these letters and post- American music and of ensemble fold He made a survey o medical'
cal School in Washington. cards from friends who remained in numbers, the musicale will feature aou
Gen. Simmons' best known pro- the islands after the fall of Bataan. women's chorus under the direction conditions in the countries he visited
Ge;fessinal contributions have been in They include mining engineersof Miss Rose Marie Grentzer, instruc- and interviewed and selected Latin
the field of neningitis and leprosy church officials and missionaries as tor of music education and instru- American students for study in thet
tfield of ninitdies ran lepoy chur sofficas. amental groups in the University. United States. Most of those selected
malaria and typhoidifeverel dTickets will be given to all who will make a special study of leprosy.
malaria and-typhoid fever. Dean Faulkner To Speak buy a bond from any member of
jDean W. J. Faulkner of Fisk Uni- either sorority. Tickets may also be While on the trip, Prof. Soule paid
versity, who has addressed several obtained at the door upon the pur- particular attention to the needs of
PtiYlo'C f th c thase of a bond or stamps. Paraguay, Bolivia and Ecuador.

1

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I

meewngs oz UII v e eZ iUL bLuenL ; .
Movement conference this week-end,
will also be the speaker at the Wes-
leyan Guild meeting at 5 p.m. today
at the First Methodist Church. His
topic will be "Building Bridges of
Understanding." Members of the
Roger Williams Guild at the First
Baptist Church are invited to attend
and will leave their Guild House at
4:55 p.m.
A discussion on the subject, "Fear
and the,.Personality" will be lead by,
Prof. P. A. Ostafin of the sociology
department at the Congregational-
Disciples Guild program at 5 p.m.
today in the Congregational Church.
A cost supper will preceed the meet-
ing.

III

P

it

Lutherans To Meet
The Lutheran Student Association
will begin their meeting with a fel-
lowship hour at 5:30 p.m. today in
the Zion Parish Hall. After supper
the program will continue with the
study of the catechism.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, will meet at 5 p.m. today at the
University Lutheran Chapel for sup-
per and a discussion period.
Dr. Andrew Kuroda of the Japan-'
ese language department will be the
speaker at a meeting of Westminster
Guild at 5 p.m. today in the First
Presbyterian Church. The supper
hour will be held at 6 p.m.?
Chi Omega Prize
Won by Andrews
Winner of the annual Chi Omega
prize for the best paper written in
sociology 51, principles of sociology,
is Valerie C. Andrews, '45, Eleanor
Ramsay, president of Chi Omega, has
announced.
Miss Andrews, a resident of Hills-
dale, titled her paper. "A Sociological
Study of the Hillsdale Theatre."
CLASSIFIED
DIRlEC7 T ty

OPEN MONDAY at 12 NOON
MONDAY and TUESDAY
for orkeris
and VICTORY GARDEN WORKERS
Were originally to $7.95
THE SLACK SUITS
Of navy cotton denim, long and short sleeve types.
Sizes to 44.
THE SLACKS
Of zelan water repellent fabric in blue and grey. Also
some wools. Sizes to 20.
TTHE JACKETS
Station wagon type of cotton twill. Navy and brown.
SHIRTS AND SLACK TOPS
Long or short sleeve types. Mostly navy denim and
cottons. Special at $1.39
OTHER SPECIALS
JUMPERS

I

At the State . . At the Michigan.. .
"Cry Havoc." now showing at the A dazzling. Technicolored musical
State, is an intense and gripping featuring the country's most beauti-
drama realistically displaying thel u oe il s h e afr'p
heroism of 13 women who took care ful cover girls is the new fanfare op-
of the wounded on Bataan. ening at the Michigan today.
In the leading roles are Joan Blon- "Cover Girl" stars Rita Hayworth
dell, Margaret Sullavan and Ann portraying the rise of anuobscure but
Sothern, each of whom expetly por- talented and beautiful nightclub
trays a, different sort of characteri- dancer to a Broadway success.
zation. Gene Kelly, Jinx Falkenburg and
One of the most unusual features of Lee Bowman also assist in making
this picture is the fact that it includes this picture able to be termed "the
the most interesting all-feminine cast ten best musicals of the year rolled
to be assembled. into one."
INVEST IN VICTORY
I BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS
"Th e re'ts A Bright
Golden Haze
ri ~ romyam
Everything is lovely in Spring - and you'll feel the same
way about our beautiful new selection of cool, smooth
WOVEN SEERSUCKERS -- they're easy on the upkeep
- trimmed with ric-rac braid or plain. In stripes or checks
of green, ble, red, or brown.
211 COHITATE
21 OUHSrr

S ecial at

$3.98

p .U- U- . .
Were to $8.95. Sizes 10-16.
SKIRTS
Mostly pastels, plaids, at $3.98, $5.00, $7.00
One Small Group of 'DRESSES

A t

$5;0_a

r

E

One Group of One- and Two-Piece DRESSES
uit type dresses, a few tailored suits.. $10.00
Sizes 9-20. Were to 529.95
One Small Group of REVERSIBLE COATS
A t $5.00 and $10.00
Smaller Sizes
Eizat>ilt 9if on Stop
'round the Corner on State
Open Monday Evenings till 8:30 for Defense Workers

V-

.

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In- C
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional 5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
FOR SALE
REVLON lipsticks and wind-milled
face powder, nail enamels and ac-
cessories at Marshalls, next to the
State Theatre.
ELECTRIC IRONS FOR SALE -
Good ones, used, reconditioned.
While they last, $3.00 up. 713 S.
Division Street.
TYPEWRITER - Corona Portable.
A-1 condition: $40.00. 8565.
ROOMS
DOUBLE rooms-twin beds, hot wat-
er, near bus and restaurants. 1021
E. University. 6554.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING: thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
HELP WANTED
BOY WANTED for dishwashing. Ap-
ply in person. Martha Cook Build-
ing ; between 8 and 1.
STUDENT-Men and women. Good
pay. Excellent meals. University
Grill. 615 East Williams. Phone

A

7-

3

W'" OS cv
Lee
Bowman%
Phil Silvers
Jinx Falkenburg

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