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February 08, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, FE ID28,1 9PTHE MICHuGAN DAILY

PAGE TnREi

a s i a Y 11 1 L

PAGE Tflft1~k

Michigan

Upholds Chicago's Losing Streak in 67-33

Win

+%

Varsity Sextet Loses to Illinois,

4-0

i

Mandler, Doyle Lead Scoring
In Varsity's Rout of Maroons'
Ellman, Maroon Guard, Steals Show from
Wolverine Duo, Although Outscored

Loud Stars inl Nets, But Illinois
Forward Line Proves Too Fast

TAKING IT EASY

Secial to The Dail
CHAMPAIGN, Feb. 27. - Capt.
Hank Loud turned in another brill-
iant performance of goal-tending
here tonight, making 62 saves, but
the Illinois hockey team sneaked four
shots past him while his teammates
were doing absolutely nothing to the
strong Illini defense, and as a result,
the Wolverines lost, 4 to 0, losing both
games in the weekend series.
The initial score came after 18:15
of the first period, Glen Rolle taking
a hard drive from Bucky Benson and
deflecting it past Loud. The two sex-
tets played on scoreless terms
throughout the second period, al-
though the hosts threatened almost
the entire time.
Benson Scores Again
Then, after 6:10 of the third period,
Benson took George Balestri's pass,
and scored on a short drive from the
right side of the goal. Two minutees
later, Capt. Amo Bessone fired a long,
sizzling drive from the Blue line,
and the surprised Wolverine goalie
watched the puck cuddle in the nets.
The time on that one was 8:18:
Trying desperately, but futilely at-
tempting to avert a shutout the
Wolves tried power drives past the
stellar Illini defense line of Bessone
and Balestri. But after losing the
puck midway in the period, Benson
drew Loud from the goal as he a.t-
tempted to fall on the puck, and a
short, lazy drive went into the nets.
Other Wolverines Play Well
Outstanding for Michigan, besides
Loud, were Bob Stenberg, Bob Der-
leth, and center Bill Dance. Illinois'
two defensive aces, Bessone and Ba-
lestri, were tops for the Illini, halt-
ing Michigan's attempt to score, on
almost all occasions before the Wol-
verines could get -across their blue
line.
Only one outbreak was seen in the
two-game series, and it occurred to-
night in the second period when Glen
Rolle and Stenberg had a little disa-
greement in mid-ice. Other players
joined in the fray, and it was rapidly
kz

r
v
i
l

developing into a free-for-all when
the officials interferred. Only Rolle
and Stenberg were penalized-five
minutes each. Although play
throughout the series was rough, it
was, for the most part, ethical.
Again No Offense

By ED ZALENSKI
Deiy Sports Editor
* * * ,

Illinois (4)
Karakas
Be.sCno (C)
Balestri
Coupe
Rolle
Benson

Pos.
G
D
SD
C
RW
LW

Michigan (0)
Loud (c)
Stenberg
Derleth
Dance
Bradley
Anderson{

SCORING- First Period: Rolle
(Benson), 18:15. Penalties: Derleth,
Stenberg. Bessone. Spares- Michi-
gan: Pontius, Mulligan, Athens. Illi-
nois: Austin, Prentiss.
Third Period: Benson (Balestri)
6:10, Bessone (Coupe) 8:18; Benson
(Coupe, Balestri) 10:18. Anderson.
Saves- Loud, 62; Karakas, 17.
' *1

GU IOMAR
NOVAES
BRAZI LIAN
PIAN 1ST

More Than Fifty
Candidates Turn
Out for Tennis
By HARVEY FRANK
It may still be winter outdoors, but
from the looks of the more than 50
students who answered the first call
for tennis candidates Friday night,
spring is practically here.
Only two lettermen, Captain Jinx
Johnson and Fred Wellington, num-
ber six and seven respectively on last
year's team, are returning to form
the nucleus of this year's squad.
Jinx was Big Ten. champ in his
bracket in 1941 and went through
last season undefeated until he was
upsetbyrDon Burst of Northwestern
in' the first round of, the conference
meet.
Wellington didn't get a chance un-
til the latter part of last season but
then he displayed enough promise
to insure a top spot this year. But,
from here on Coach Leroy Weir. will
be dealing with untried material.
Lewis Fine Prospect
One of Weir's leading prospects,
for the coming season, however, is
Roger Lewis, former Michigan high
school singles champ from Ann Ar-
or, who was made eligible by the
recent repealing of the freshman
ban. A southpaw, Lewis is almosta
sure bet for one of the. three, top
positions.
The other three spots will be filled
by either members of last year's re-
serve and freshman squads or by
fi'eshmen. Several of those from last
year, Bob Mathews, Bill Hungerford,
Fred Sleator, Ed Scott, Roy Boucher,
Dave Post, and Roy Bradley, have
already worked out several times.
Although limited by transportation
difficulties, the Wolverines have sev-
en dual and the Big Ten meets. They
open the season against Purdue here
April 23, play Illinois here the next
day, and then go to Lansing to play
Michigan State April 29.
They play Chicago there May 6,
and then go to Evanston for two
matches, against Ohio State May 7
and against Northwestern the next
day. Michigan State comes here for
a return match May 10, and then the
Wolverines wind up their season with
the Big Ten meet at Evanston, May
13, 14, 15.
ATTENTION!
All interested students, includ-
ing freshmen, who are eligible, are
asked to report at the golf driving
nets in the Sports Building Tues-
day at 7:30 p.m. for the first prac-
tice of the spring season.
-Coach Ray Courtright

More Basketball .. .
YESTERDAY a letter was printed
in this column in which a Michi-
gan. student brought up certain
points in an attempt to refute our at-
tack on the abject failure of the cur-
rent Wolverine basketball team, and
the cage sport in general over a five-
year period. Because we think this
cage question important to all stu-
dents, and Michigan sport fans, we
would like to continue this discussion.
The writer accused us, first, of
choosing the wrong time to bring
up an attack on Michigan basket
ball and Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
because it would upset them. The
fact that we chose the week before
the Chicago game . . . is poor, he
said. Chicago has lost 37 consecu-
games, and hasn't even a sem-
blance of a basketball team. IfI
things are so bad that bringing up
issues before meeting such a weak
team as this would upset them, it
certainly proves that it's high time
to bring this issue in the open.
There is another aspect of this ac-
cusation. If this is the wrong time to
attack basketball here, when is the
RIGHT TIME? Perhaps, the writer
infers that we should have waited
until the season was over, and inter-
est in the cage sport was completely
dead. The time to attack is when the
issue is alive-NOT DEAD.
THE second point brought out by
the writer is that this column
has inferred Michigan needs a new
coach. And he adds further that it
is not the time to ask for the ouster
of a coach, snee this season may
be the last for the duration and
there are no coaches available to
replace Oosterbaan.
Our answer, blunt and to the point,
is this: Either Michigan should adopt
a new system of play or else Ooster-
baan should step out and let someone
else take a crack at the job of coach-
ing Michigan basketball. Perhaps,
this is the last season for the dura-
tion. That is all the more reason why
the matter should be brought up at
this time. A period of inactivity would
causedeveryone to forget the poor
records of Michigan cage teams the
past five years, and it might take an-
other five years before someone de-
cided to do something about it. The
crack about lack of coaches is un-
founded. There are men at this Uni-
versity now who would jump at the
chance of trying to solve the problem.
JUST FOR THE- RECORD LET{
US CLEAR UP ONE POINT. ANY-
ONE WHO IS ACQUAINTED
WITH MICHIGAN SPORTS
KNOWS THAT BENNIE IS ONE
OF THE GREATEST ATHLETES
AND SWELLEST GUYS MICHI-
GAN HAS EVER PRODUCED.
AND BENNIE IS A TOPNOTCH
END COACH AND ONE OF CRIS-
LER'S BEST SCOUTS. WE LIKE
BENNIE AND THINK HE IS ONE
OF THE FINEST FELLOWS WE
HAVE EVER MET. THIS TIME,
HOWEVER, WE ARE TALKING
ABOUT BASKETBALL, NOT
BENNIE.
Thirdly, the writer says that
there is not one star or potential
star on the Maize and Blue club.
Even Bennie would disagree with
that statement. We have it
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 6615

from Bennie himself tha t DAVE
STRACK, for one is a potential
star, if not more. Who can deny
that Jim Mandler is not a poten-
tial star. Jim has ranked as one of
the outstanding centers in the Con-
ference in the past two years.
Even we will admit that he has
slowed up this year. But he IS A
POTENTIAL STAR.
THE writer asks "What is the ap-
parent reason for the lack of stars
on the Michigan five?" Yes, Michi-
gan is a notoriously poor high school
cage state. But Mandler, Strack, Ger-
ry Mullaney, Mel Comm and Bob
Wiese, to mention a few of Michigan's
cagers, ARE NOT MICHIGAN
CAGERS. A school that is as power-
ful as Michigan is in football, track,
baseball and swimming is bound to
attract some topnotch cage material.
Your proof is that list of names
above. The argument that a losing
team does not attract good material
won't hold water here, because Mich-
igan draws topnotch athletes in other
sports and, incidentally, basketball
players. Wiese came here as a highly
touted gridder, yet he was all-state
cager in North Dakota.
And, lastly, the writer brings up
the "fast break." Before the season
started last fall we talked to a
number of promising sophomore
candidates. Their morale was al-
ready at a low point. They all
liked Bennie as Bennie, BUT
THEY WEREN'T SATISFIED
WITH HIM AS A COACH EVEN
BEFORE THEY STARTED TO
PLAY. What can you expect of a
team when the players carry that
attitude. Many of these players did
not realize that their words "might
be used against them" and conse-
quently, did not hesitate to tell the
truth. We have watched practice
and noted the lackadaisical atti-
tude of the players. They seem to
be taking advantage of Bennie 's
easy-going and good-natured dis-
position.
WHAT DOES THIS ALL BOIL
DOWN TO? We don't hesitate to
say that the cagers are not condi-
tioned as well as they might be, and,
therefore, cannot give as much to
the game as they might. If Bennie
had adopted the "fast break" at the
start of the season, he may have
developed the proper Conditioning for
that system by a combination of hard
practice and track work. Bennie him-
self likes the fast break and wonders
how he would have fared this season,
if he had adopted it.
The writer closes with these.
words: " . . . the team never got
together enough to function as a
good club should function. Nor did
it ever get the confidence that team
should have."
And one more word to the readers.
WHERE WOULD FRITZ CRISLER
BE TODAY IF HIS GRIDDERS HAD
TURNED UP A RECORD PARAL-
LELING THAT OF OOSTERBAAN?
ASK HARRY KIPKE FOR THE AN-
SWER TO THAT ONE.

By DON SWANINGERI
Michigan's miuch - talked - about
basketball five defended Chicago's
amazing 37-game losing streak last
night by running away with the dis-
organized Maroons, 67-33 for their
third Big Ten victory.
The Wolverines, point hungry,
seemed bent on making up for their
scoring famine in past games, hitting
their shots consistently in the early
moments to roll up a quick 15-4 lead.

baan emptied his bench that the
score was no worse than it was.
Every member of the Maize and
Blue's eleven-man roster found his
way into the lineup at some time or
another, and all but two men broke
intq the scoring. They sank 13 of
18 free throws while the visitors
could only connect with 10 of 19. The
Wolverines were not especially good,
but beside the midget Chicago squad
they appeared nothing short of tre-
mendous.
Michigan To Meet Wildcats
Tomorrow night the Varsity will
have its hands full with a North-
western quintet that rolled over
it, 49-32, in an early season contest
and hasn't become any worse since.
At the same time the Maroons will
carry their defeat string, now ex-
panded to 38, against an Illinois
squad that is considered the best
college team in the country. That
one should be a "dilly."
Back on the Credit Side

MICHIGAN (67)
Gibert, f......
Ketterer, f. .....
Mullaney, f. ... ,
Comin, f......
Spreen, f......
Anderson, f. .
Mandler, c. .....
Pregulman, c.
Doyle, g. .......
Strack, g. .......
Lund, g...... . .
Totals .........
CHICAGO (33)
Nelson, f......
Zimmerman, f.'...
Fogel, f........
Crosbie, c...
Ellmnan, g. ......
Soloman, g.
Oakley, g......
Krakowka, g.
Totals.......

.....

FG FT:
2 0
0 0
4 1
2 2
0 0
2 0
8 2
1 1
6 3
1 4
1 0

PF TP
2 4
S 0
3 9
4 6
0 0
2 4
3 18
1 3
1 15
4 6
0 2

.27 13 20 67

LEO DOYLE
... Wolverine guard who hit the
bucket consistently in last night's
encounter with the Chicago Ma-
roons to account for 15 points.
From then on they controlled the
backboards and made easy meat of
the Maroons, leading at half time by
the score of 33-16.-
Although scoring was led by two
Michigan men, Jim Mandler and Leo
Doyle with 18 and 15 points respec-
tively, it was a sophomore Chicagoan,
Guard Harold Ellman, who stole the
show. Playing with a dash that
seemed out of place to a Maroon-
shirted performer, Ellman dropped
in 12 points before being forced to
leave thme game on fouls in the open-
ing minute of the second half.
Ellman Scores Early
At the beginning of the game it
looked as if he were the only Chi-
cagoan who knew how to take a shot.
He scored the first ten points that
his team made. Gradually, however,
his teammates began to catch on. But
only gradually.
The Chicagoans had come to town
not only with a phenomenal losing
streak, but also with the miraculous
record of having been scored upon
at the rate of 58 points per game
this season. They explained this mir-
acle as, using a zone defense, 'they
did little to stop the offensive man-
euvers of the Wolverines. It was
only because Coach Bennie Ooster-

IFG
0
0
2
tQ

FT
1
0
1
2
0
2.
2

PFTP
3 3
1 1
0 4
3 5
4 12
2 2
2 2
2 4

:111 17 33

Half Time Score-- Chicago, 16;
Michigan, 33.
Free Throiws bissed-.- -Gibert, 2;
Mullaney, 2; Doyle, 2; Comin, Preg-
ulman; Nelson, 2; Crosbie, 3; Oak-
ley, 2; Ellman, 2; i akowka.

Frosh Track
Squad Defeats
Michigan State
By JACK MARTIN
Coach Chet Stackhouse's freshman
track squad remains undefeated after
trimming the Michigan State frosh.
61 Vs to 36 4/5, at Yost Field House
yesterday.
The Wolverines captured eight
first places, while the visitors man-
aged to finish ahead in only three.
The two teams split the winning
honors in the pole vault.
If there were individual stars in
the contest, Michigan's Bob Nuss-
baumer fills the bill. The fleet-foot-
ed freshman won both the 60-yard
dash and the 60-yard low hurdles,
and ran the initial quarter-mile in
the Wolverines' victorious mile relay
team. He ran the dash in 6.6, and
sprinted the lows in the very good
freshman time of 7.9.
Equally outstanding was Ward
Lyke, distance ace from Michigan
State. Lyke took the mile run and
the gruelling 2-mile race. His mile
time was 4:48.5, the 2-mile, 10:19.4.
Michigan again showed its greatest
strength in the field, finishing first
in all four events, including the pole
vault tie. George Kraeger hurled the
shot put 43' 9/4" to take that con-
test; Fred Weaver captured the high
jump with a leap of 6' %"; the broad
jump again went to Varkin Baydar-
ian, who went 20' 61/"; and Gene
Moody tied State's Bill Marshall in
the pole vault at the height of 11' 6".
Bill Matney of the Wolverines won
the 440-yard run in 52.5 seconds, fol-
lowed by Don Sternisha, another
Maize and Blue speedster. The half-
mile went. to Michigan's Dick Holl,
who covered the distance in 2:01.7.
Michigan's strong mile relay outfit
was a winner in 3:35.7, these boys
carrying the baton: Nussbaumer,
Pierce, Sternisha, and Matney.
A surprising performance was
made by Jack Morrison in the 2-mile
race. Running his best time of the
season, he finished second, outsprint-
ing favored Bob Edmondson, also of
Michigan,
"Keep Ahead of Your Hair"
Let us give you a Military Style that
will stand inspection and suit your
appearance.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich. Theatres

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SUN., FER. 28
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Tickets
Available,

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$1. 10. 85c... 55c
at Rink, Union, League

Combining
Fun and
Physical

FRI., MAR. 5, 8:30
(Instead of LDetoit Orchestra-
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NELSON
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Anytimre Is
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11

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111111

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