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February 16, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


--

TAKING ITFA C.SY-

Boilermak~ers Beat Michigan
P ----------

fly El) ZALENSKI
Deity Sports Editor

lichigerr's Mr. " T'ilor tron.I
It is regretable that our initial col-
umn on this page has to be a eulogy
for Iarry A. Tillotson. Officially he
was business manager of the Uni-
versity of Michigan Athletic Asso-
ciation. But he became widely known
through his activities as football tick-
et manager.
Our regrets are for his loss which
necessitates a resume of his 23-year
record of service. No man can serve
a master for such a long period of
time as faithfully and skillfully as
Mr. J'illotson did without making
that gap he left appear noticeably
wide.
'An Irreparrable loss'
Fritz Crisler, Wolverine grid men-
tor since 1935, summarized the gen-
ral sentiment of University athletic
authorities and coaches when he de-
:lared the loss of the good-natured
ticket genius was "irreparable."
"He can't be replaced, Crisler
asserted. "His 23 years of service
will be difficult to duplicate. Where
could you find a man like him now.
He took to his job naturally. And
he had more than his share of
headaches since 1920, but I have
never seen him flustered or ruffled.
His loss is irreparable," Crisler de-
clared.
Although he was only 57 years old,
Mr. Tillotson began his business ca-
┬░eer s an employe of a New York
_ity importing firm, winding up in
knn Arbor with the Michigan Central
railroad as ticket agent in 1914 just
before the outbreak of World War I:
His appointment as business
manager was made by Phil Bar-
telne, University director of ath-
letis .from 1910 to 1920. Back in
those gay post-war days, Mr. Til-
lotson was situated in what is now
the Ann Arbor Press building. Uni-
versity administration of athletics
was directed from there at that
time.
SPRUCE UP!
For all occasions with a scalp treat-
ment for dandruff, itchy scalp, fall-
ing hair. Be It a "Personality" style
or a "Military Crew."
The DASCOA BARBERS
!Between Statc and Mich. Theatres

Michigan's grand old man, Fielding
H. Yost, knew Mr. Tillotson as well
as any other member of the athletic
staff, and r'eferred to him as the
University's greatest exponent of
goodwill.
'A Shack Absorber'
Leaning back in his swivel chair
with a dreamy look in his eyes Yost
bridged the span of 23 years when
he first became associated with Mr.
Tillotson. "Naturally, long asso-
ciation with hir has made me real-
ize that he was in reality a 'shock
absorber.' I had never seen him
ruffled or excited. It was up to
him to keep the goodwill of the
ticket-seeking public, add to it and
develop it. And he did. People us-
ually don't know how tickets are
allotted and their demands are
sometimes impossible. It is impos-
sible to replace a man who had
worked so willingly and who co-
operated so well."
Our acquaintance with Mr. Til~
lotson was limited to several short
sessions, but we know him to be a
square-shooter, a conscientious man
and. a friend to every, student, alum-
nus and ticket-purchaser with whom
he came in contact.
'Perpetual Headache'
His job was "a perpetual head-
ache" but he took it in stride. They
mobbed him with telegrams on
trains, during vacations, at bridge,
at the dinner table. They woke him
up in the middle of the night to
beg for tickets on the 50-yard line.
Every alumnus in the country
wanted a 50-yard line ticket and
some how Mr. Tillotson satisfied
their demands.
He was the students' best friend.
It was his constant efforts that re-
sulted in the present ticket-dispens-
ing basis for University students. Ev-
ery ticket transaction of his was
strictly above board. That was his
only method of business.
LANTERN NOTE:
For Ohio State'

Pucksters
Weak for'
Minnesota
By WALT KLEE
After watching the Wolverine puck-
men absorb a 7-2 drubbing at the
hands of a 'not too powerful Paris A.C.
sextet, things look pretty black for
the Michigan cause in this week's two
tilts with the Minnesota Gophers here
Thursday and Saturday.
The loss of the three men on the
first line, due to graduation and in-
eligibility, has taken away most of
the, experienced players from the
squad. 'Threremains a 'fair start-
ing combination, with almost no re-
placements with any experience in
actual games.
Opland Uncertain
The status of center Bob Opland is
not yet definite and there still is a
ba e chance that he may return to
the ice in time to face the Norsemen
on Thursday night.
Until last Saturday night things.
were moving along fairly smoothly for
Eddie Lowrey's boys. Opland was be-
ginning to show signs of becoming the
most sentational stickman that skated
for the Maize and Blue in many years.
But; after the graduation of Bob
Kemp and Ed Reichert, and the loss
of Opland, Lowrey was faiced with
the impossible task of forming an en-
tire new front line from mediocre ma-
terial.
New Line Has Power
This combination of Bill Dance at
center and Roy Bradley and Gordon
Anderson played well in the Paris tilt.
In fact for two periods they played so
well they outplayed the Canadian
lines; but in the third period they
just couldn't keep pace with the more
numerous visitors and completely fell
apart. This line can be counted on
for a goal or two in each game this
week. But here the Wolverine power
stops.
The second line is made up of two
men who never played .hockey before,
and {a third who has more spirit and
fight than ability. It was against this
line that Paris scored four of its seven
goals. And this line can't possibly

Gets Chance

W~1verines Drop Fourth
Straight Big Ten Game
Ehlers Makes Ten Points To Lead Scoring;
Shoddy Play Features Slow Moving Game
a.-

ROY BRADLEY
... Who'll start as wing on the first
line, moving up to take Bob Kemp's
place.
improve enough to be a real scoring
threat for at least two or three more
weeks.
The only ray of sunshine in a sky
filled with black, ominous clouds is-
the much improved play of Miehigan
defensemen Bob Derleth and Bob
Stenberg. These two played sixty,
minutes of bangup defensive hockey
on Saturday, in addition to making
many forays with the puck deep down
into Canadian ice.
After the game, Saturday, Coach
Lowrey said; "We could give up; but
as I have six men who can stand up
on skates, Michigan will have a team
that is doing its best."
Illini Down Gophers
MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 15.- (R)- In
a game that proved to be a personal
scoring triumph for Illinois' great
star, Andy Phillip,, Illinois defeated
Minnesota tonight, 67 to 43, and
thereby took over the Big Ten basket-
ball leadership as Wisconsin defeated
the hitherto unbeaten Indiana team.

By DON SWANINGER
Taking a decisive lead late in the
first half,jPurdue University's Boiler-
makers took the first of a two-game
series from a ragged Michigan quin-
tet in the Yost Field House last night,
33-27. It was the Wolverines' fourth
straight Big Ten loss.
The big question of the evening
was which was the "colder"-the
weather or the Wolverines, and those;
who appreciate good. ball handling,
and accurate shooting will insist that
the weather, sub-zero as it was, never,
had a fighting chance. Michigan
just couldn't click.
Ehlers Opens Scoring
Scoring opened up with Ed. Ehlers.,
slippery Boilermaker guard and highs
scorer for the evening, breaking
through to drop in the first two of
his ten- points. Jim Mandler, came'
right ,back to' get the equalizer 'for
the Wolverines, and after John Ken-
nedy-had looped in a free-throw, Leo
Doyle ,hit the 'bucket to again put
the Maize and Blue in front. During
the -next _five minutes. the lead see-
sawed back and forth with Mandler
finally hitting to put Michigan on
top, Q,-7....
Such a-. lead was destined to be
short-lived, however. After a lull of
some five minutes,.during.which both
teams gave a masterful exhibition of
how not to scorer the Purdue squad
broke loose with a flurry of baskets:
that netted .them 13 points and a
nine pointlead as they held the fad-
ing Wolverines to a single free throw
in that time. They held a 20-11 mar-
gin at the half.
Michigan Rallies
In the 'second, half it '.was no' df-f
ferent. For a few minutes it'looked
as if it might be, as Michigan, helped
by baskets by Dave" Strack and Bob-
Wiese,:.pulled to within four 'points
of the. Boilexrmakes, but the spurt
soon died out, and the visitors, play-
Well, It .Was Close! I

ing deliberate basketball and care-
fully picking their opportunities, eas-
ily held on to a six point lead.
Key to the victory was the fact that
the Purdue squad was a little too ef-
fective at the foul line. The visitors,
although they could sink only 10 field
goals to the Wolverines 11, dropped in
13 free tosses to the latter's five.
Neither team, however, looked wor-
thy of the name of a Big Ten squad.
The visitors bore no- resemblance to
other Purdue fives that have invaded
the Field House in past years. They
took 60 shots on the basket and con-
nected with but 10 of them, while
Michigan took 58 shots in bagging
their 11 field goals.; Purdue at times
cooked as if it was doing its best
to lose, but it was no use. Michigan
was too big an assignment.
Tonight the two squads will :engage
in the second of their two-game se-
ries.
'ThincOAdS Loom
As Ch'olice f'or'
Big ,Ten crown
A Michigan track team that cap-
tured seven first places last Saturday
at the. Spartan Relay Carnival in
East Lansing. with a great display of
running power looked like the outfit
to beat in the 1943 indoor Conference
meet at Chicago, III., March 5-6.
Undoubtedly the 'running of Bob
Ufer was the finest individual exhibi-
tion ever seen at East Lansing. Com-
menting " on Ufer's performances
Coach Ken Doherty said; "His run-
ning was as great as any I have ever
seen by a middle distance man in one
evening."
Ufer in Rare Form
The Wolverine's national indoor
440-king opened with a mark of 31.4
seconds,;in, the 300-yard dash, just
two-tenths: of a second short of the
world. record made on a larger track;.
his 1:55.1 in the winning spring med-
ley relay broke his own Varsity record
of 1:55.3; and his 49.1 quarter in the
winning mile relay speaks for itself.
Doherty got his biggest surprise
when the shuttle hurdle quartet
whipped through the 240 yards in 31.1
for a new Carnival record, and more
than a second better than the best
time turned in by the team in trials.
Six Do 'Best' Job
Best times were turned{ in by John
Ingersoll with a 1:57.8 for his half-
mile jaunt in the two-mile relay; Bob
Hume,'was. clocked in 4:27.1 for his
mile of the distanrce medley relay; Jim
Sears clicked off~a 50.5-second quar-
ter in 'the 'mile relay and Captain
Dave Matthews followed with a 50.5-
second 440. Of the Frosh medley run-
ners Bob Nussbaumer's 220-yard dash
im 23.4 and Dick Hall's 880 in 2:00.8
were best performances to date. -

Return Match

.

1

War Bonds Issued Here!
jANN ARBO SNIWSET T-EAThE.,
Continuous from 1 P. M
NOW PLAYI NG
r.

By JOE McHALE
Fresh from a successful invasion Qf
Iowa, where they bettered two NCAA
and two Big Ten records in beating'
the Hawkeyes, 62-22, the Wolverine
swimming tWm is all set for a week
of practicing twice 'a day in prepara-
tion for the last dual meet of the
season, a return thriller with Ohio
State this Saturday at Columbus.
ThetOhio State Lantern, already
heralding a Buckeye victory by about
four points in this second contest,
well might take heed of the perfor-
mance turned in by the Maize and
Blue mermen last Saturday night.
True it is that the Bucks were with-
out the services of their captain and
ace backstroker, Mark Follansbee, in
the first Michigan-Ohio contest. But
even Follansbee, Big Ten champ,
stands an insignificant chance of de-
feating the Michigan. sophomore sen-
sation, Harry Holiday.
Still Breaking Records
Holiday, swimming in an unortho-
dox 20-yard pool, managed to nego-
tiate the 150-yard distance in 1:30.9,
bettering existing Collegiate and Con-
ference marks. He was also clocked
unofficially in 56.7 seconds for 100
yards during the medley relay. This
time is half a second better than
Adolf Kiefer's accepted standard.
The medley relay trio of Holiday,
Pat Hayes and Captain Johnny Pat-
ten continued on its record-breaking
way as it turned in a time of 2:51.1,
three seconds faster than the NCAA
and Big Ten marks. In swimming a
2:54.3 race to open the last Buckeye
affair, this same trio finished far
ahead of the Buck squad..
Other races won by the Mattmen
in faster time than the winning ef-
forts in the' Ohio contest, were the
400-yard freestyle relay, the 100-yard
freestyle, and the 200-yard breast-
stroke.
And the Lantern claims that Ohio
State's improvement will win this
week's dual contest!

II

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

P1
B1
K
m~
14
El

U'iDUE (33) FG FT PF TP
igs, f............1 3 0 5
:ennedy, f. ........ 0 2 1 2
riends, f...........1 1 .4 3
rower, f. .......... 0' 0 0 0
Fenke, c. ........... 2 2 3 6
Awson,.g. .......... . 2 2 1 6
hlers, g............4 3 3 11
Totals ............10 13 12 33

", - .-n

i : ' :.-:. ..: ' . 4
i . rl -_--__ -.
i

MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND AND GRAVE-
Driveway' gravel, washed pebbles.
IKillins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
TYPEWRITERS of all makes. Of-
fice and portable models. Bought,
rented, repaired. Student and Of -
fice Supplies. 0. D. Morrill, 314
South State St. Phone 6615.
FOR SALE
BICYCLE-A-1 shape for sale. Call
2-4589. Leonard Grossman.
IDENTIFICATION PHOTOGRAPHS
-Any size. For 1-day service come
to 802 Packard. 6-7:30 weekdays.
TUX AND TAILS.sizes 38 to 42. Good
condition. Call 2-1988.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY --2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
WANTED
WANTED USED CLOTHES. Better
prices paid. Ben, The Tailor. 122 E.
Washington. After 6 p.m. phone
5387.
ALTERATIONS
STOCKWELL & MOSHER-JORDAN
residents-Alternations on women's
garments promptly done. Opposite
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678.

TYPING
MISS ALLEN--Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935,
HELP WANTED-MALE
STUDENT for 2 hours janitor work,
anytime between midnight and 10
a.m. 50c per hour. Miller's Dairy
Store, 1219 S. University.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Male or Female.
Full or part time. Knowledge of
typing desirable. State Street
Store. Answer fully Box 63, Michi-
gan Daily.
COLLEGE or high school students to
deliver Michigan Dailies. Good sal-
ary. Call 2-3241, ask for Mrs.
Mosher. _
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED-Second-hand slide rule;
also second-hand fluorescent. Call
or see Richard Dawson, 819 E. Uni-
versity, phone 2-1147.
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Dark horn rimmed glasses in
E. B. Meyrowitz case. Call 24514.
LOST SUNDAY-Blue Indian purse.
South U. between Arch and Wash-
tenaw. Please call 2-1055.

MCHMAN (27) FG
Gibert, f )...........
Doyle,'L............3
Wise, f............1
Mandler c......... 3
Muila ey, c.........0
'Lund, g............1.
Strack, g...........3

FT
0
2:
0
1
1
1
0

PF TP
4 0
2 8S
1 2
3 7
2 1
1 3'
3 6

Totals .........11 5 16 27
Halftime Score: Purdue 20; Michi-
gan -11,

r+s

MMMWAW .

," r
. _

with
RO STCESER
EDMUND GWENk
ANNE REVERE
HELENE REYNOLDS
Also
JERRY WALD ORCHESTRA
PORTRAIT OF A GENIUS
KEEP 'EM SAILING
NEWS OF THE DAY
Coming Thursday
"BUSSES ROAR"

Pecks of peasure in
e .
:a *

uniforms o quaity
Under normal conditions these
U.S. Army blouse and trouser
out fits WoUld be sold f or
eighty'dl lars.
Through a special co-operative
arrangement, we are pleased
to offer them to our officer
c stomers at a 2 % saving.
The quility is unsurpassed.

.i

111'

COAT
Wad

...aged-in, sealed-in flavor!

9

REGULATION CAPS SHOES .- -SHIRTS

I

1 1 4

I

It

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