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May 06, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. ..W$U$BDA Y, , MAY 6, 1943

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAGE THREE

XUUXSDAYI MAY 6, 1943 I A1IJ~ THREE

Second

Big Ten

Match

for

Netmen

with

Chicago

Today

(i'.

Michigan Seeks
First Triumph
In Conference
Maize and Blue Squad
Favored in Battle with
Strong Maroon Team
By HARVEY FRANK
Opening a three-day stand against
ti 'ten opponents, Michigan's ten-
xiis team will play its second Confer-
ence match against the University of
Chicago today at Chicago.
The Wolverines, beaten 5-4 in their
first Big Ten match by Illinois, will
stay in the Windy City to take on
Ohio State tomorrow, and then will
take the short jaunt to Evanston to
meet Northwestern on Saturday.
" Despite the loss of all six of last
year's lettermen the Maroon squad
is, still dangerous. Wally Michel,
number five man last year, played'
#%umber one for them in the earlier
matches, but was expected to be lost
to the armed services before the sea-
son was half over.
'thus, Earl Theimer and Grover
Daly, members of Chicago's "B" team
last year, will probably start at one
and two against the Wolverines to-
day. Frank Trovillion, Phil Glotzer,
and Harry Tully will play three, four,
fnd five, with the sixth spot still
Undecided.
*For the Wolverines it will be Jinx
Johnson .at one, Roger Lewis, two;
Roy Bradley, three; Fred Wellington,
four; Roy Boucher, five; and Fred
Sleator, six.
.The doubles will probably line up
as: they have all year. Lewis and
Wellington will play one; Johnson
and Bradley, two; and Boucher and
Merle Brown, three.
'Last year Chicago tied the Maize
and, Blie for second place in the
Onference, with their ace, Cal Saw-
yier, winning the number one singles
crown. So far this year the Maroon
team has defeated Minnesota, 8-1,
in a Big Ten match.
The Wolverines will be favored,1
however, to .take their first Confer-
ence win of the season.

Only Home

Track Meet of Season Saturday

Nine To Open Series
At Purdue Tomorrow

Faces Buckeye Flash

Buckeye, Spartan Cindermen
To Run in Triangular Meet

c,

By JOE McHALE
The Wolverine baseball team will
be facing virtually an unknown
quantity when it faces the Purdue
Boilermaker squad in the first game
of a two-game series tomorrow at
Lafayette.
The Boilermakers have had no
Conference games as yet, while
Michigan will be fighting to keep its
hold on first place, a position it oc-
cupies Jointly with Wisconsin at the
present time.
Although they did win two games
last week-end from St. Joseph, the
Boilermakers took both by narrow
margins. Earlier in the spring Pur-
due played the Cleveland Indians,
but since Cleveland pitchers per-
formed for both teams, not much
Paul Dean Starts
On Comeback Trail
ST. LOUIS, May 5.-(Y)-The box
score of the Detroit Tigers-St. Loius
Browns' series opener Tuesday hints
at the drama of a former star pitcher
starting a comeback attempt against
the team he beat twice in the memor-
able World Series of 1934.
In cold print, it listed "Dean" as
a pitcher for the Browns-a terse
identification of the once great Paul
Dean, who paired with Brother Dizzy
to reach baseball fame in the Gas-
house Days of the St. Louis Cardi-
nals. In the 1934 World Series
against Detroit, "Me 'n' Paul" each
won two games after pitching a total
of 49 victories during the regular
season.
Arm trouble forced Paul out of the
major league and he tried without
success to return with the Cardinals
and then with the New York Giants
before the Browns bought him from
Houston, via Washington, this win-
ter.

indication of Purdue's strength could
be gained from this game. The Lou-
isville Colonels were also played dur-
ing the spring training season.
This year the Lafayette team has
three letter-winners as its core with
a star sophomore, a sprinkling of
freshmen and some service men fill-
ing in the vacant spots. The 'chief
weakness seems to be behind the
plate, for the backstop is a converted
infielder, Walt Hesse.
Leading the pitching staff is senior
letter-winner Ed Misselhorn. Not
much is known about him, either, for
he didn't pitch too much last year
and didn't appear against the Wol-
verines. He is reported to be in fine
form, however, along with Irv Class-
man, who will probably pitch the
Saturday encounter.
In the outfield will be Paul Friend
at left field, one of the three letter-
winners, scrappy little Henry Strain
in center and Charles Wright in
right. Stram has received his orders
to report for induction Saturday and
may not be available.
Ehlers Leading Prospect
The leading infield prospect is
Ed Ehlers, sophomore who starred on
the Boilermaker basketball team. He
holds down the third base post. Bill
Burghardt, veteran shortstop and
the third letter-winner on the squad,
is counted on to furnish some more
punch to the outfit. Jim Jennings
will be the first sacker, and Jack
Irmsher will cover second.
The Wolverines will go into tomor-
row afternoon's contest with three
wins and one loss in Conference
competition. A pair of wins are al-
most essential to keep in the race
for the title, and, "If we don't make
too many mistakes and have a fair
amount of luck, we ought to take
the series," according to Coach Ray
Fisher.
Major Leaoue
Standings

6 ,

Its a
SLACK
seaSOn

A .F yam, ."".
.'A1..

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
New York . .............9 3
Cleveland ............8 4
Detroit ...............7 4
Washington ...........8 6
St. Louis ..............4 6
Philadelphia ..........5 9
Boston ................4 8
Chicago ..............3 8
Detroit 5, St. Louis 1.
New York 4, Boston 3.
Washington 8, Philadelphia

Pct.
.750
.667
.636
.571
.400
.357
.333
.2731
1.

I

CHUCK PINNEY
. .Wolverine star wuo will face
Ohio State's ace Dallas Dupre in
the low hurdle race and broad
jump here Saturday.
Over mire Stars
As Tigers Whip
St. Louis, 5-
ST. LOUIS, May 5. -(P)- Little
Frank (Stub) Overmire pitched the
Detroit Tigers to their fourth succes-
sive 1943 victory over the St. Louis
Browns by coming up with a neat
four-hit 5 to 1 triumph today for his
second major league success.
Overmire, five-foot, seven-inch
rookie southpaw from Grand Rapids
via Western Michigan College who
beat the Cleveland Indians 4 to 1
on a five-hitter in his big league de-
but, was just as efficient today. The
Tigers knocked the veteran Nelson
Potter out of action with four runs
in less than two innings, and that's
all Overmire needed.
The Brownies didn't get anything
that resembled a hit until Mike
Chartak singled to center with two
out in the fifth. Two innings later
the Browns clustered their remaining
three hits for the sole run.
Stub Issues Two Walks
Noted for his pin-point control,
Overmire issued the relatively large
total of two passes today. He didn't
strike out anybody. He merely in-
duced the Brownies to hit harmless
infield grounders or lazy outfield
flies. Overmire's buddy, Dick Wake-
field, had five chances in left field.
The Tigers meanwhile gathered
nine hits against four enemy hurlers
to compile five runs, their largest
scoring total of the season. The first
inning rally produced three runs, all
after two were out, and was the best.
Big First Inning
Joe Hoover fanned and Ned Harris
popped out, but Wakefield was safe
on George McQuinn's bad throw to
Potter, who was covering first. Rudy
York walked, and then Pinky Hig-
gins, Rip Radcliff and Jimmy Blood-
worth punched successive singles
that drove in a run each. Potter got
out alive by fanning Dixie Parsons.
In the second Overmire and Hoov-
er went out, but Harris and Wake-
field walked and York singled Har-
ris home before Rookie Fred Sanford
came in to retire Higgin and the side.
Sanford got along all right until
the fourth when, with one out, Hoov-
er singled and stole second. Harris
tripled him home.
The Tigers went scoreless there-
after with ex-Tiger Archie McKain
and Bob Muncrief working the last
three frames.
Detroit .......310 100 000-5 9 0
St. Louis .....000 000 100-1 4 1
Overmire and Parsons; Potter, San-
ford (2), McKain (7), Muncrief (9)
and Ferrell.

By JACK MARTIN
Cindermen from Ohio State, Mich-<
igan State, and Michigan clash at
Ferry Field this coming Saturday in
the Wolverine's first and only home
track meet of theoutdoor season.m
The Maize and Blue have a special
incentive for a victory over the Buck-
eyes this year. They remember all
too well the trip to Columbus last
May and the Bucks' stunning 81 2/3'
to 40%/3 triumph; consequently, ven-
geance is the keyword now.
Ohio State's squad has been hard
hit by calls from the armed forces
and by ineligibility this season. Many
of last year's championship outfit
are gone.
Bob Wright, Ohio's hurdle king,
came upon eligibility woes in the in-
door season, and they continued into
the outdoor meets. Wright was Big
Ten champion in both the highs and
lows, and his loss is a very decided
setback for the Bucks.
And Russ Owen is absent from
Ohio's entry list. Owen won the 440
in last May's Michigan-Ohio dual
battle, nosing out the Wolverines'
Bob Ufer by a yard for an unexpec-
ted victory. Leroy Collins, who is
also gone, nipped the Michigan ace,
too.
George Hoeflinger, another hurdle
star, is lost to the Bucks. Hoeflinger
was second to Wright in the highs
in last season's dual meet. Further
losses are Jim Trepanier and Chet
Thomas, sprinters. Trepanier placed
second in both the 100 and 220 in
last year's contest, while Thomas won
the 60-yard dash in the indoor en-
counter with Ohio here in February.
Regardless of these Buckeye dis-
Major League
Highights..
BOSTON, May 5.- (P)- The New
York Giants swept a doubleheader
from the Boston Braves today, 5 to
1 and 7 to 3, winning the second
game on the strength of a six-run
sixth inning after homers by Buster
Maynard and Sid Gordon had pro-
pelled them to victory in the opener.
BROOKLYN, May 5.- (P)- The
Brooklyn Dodgers collected 23 hits
today to overwhelm the Philadelphia
Phillies 18 to 6 behind Max Macon,
who gave a dozen safeties but al-
lowed no scoring till the sixth inning.
The Brooklyn blows included Dolph
Camilli's second homer of the spring.
* * *
CHICAGO, May 5.- ()- Catcher
Chico Hernandez's sharp double play
grounder hopped over second base-
man Jimmy Brown's shoulder to
score Heinz Becker from second with
one out in the 14th inning today and
gave Claude Passeau, veteran Chi-
cago Cub right-hander, a 2-1 mara-
thon decision over Max Lanier, St.
Louis Cardinals' southpaw.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA, May 5.- (P)-
Jumping on relief pitcher Sam Har-
ris for five runs in the eighth, the
Washington Senators trounced the
Philadelphia Athletics 8-1 in the
second game of a series today.
* *r
CLEVELAND, May 5.-(A')-Rookie
Dick Culler lined a two-run double
off tiring Cleveland relief pitcher
Allie Reynolds in the eleventh inn-
ing today to give the Chicago White
Sox a 5 to 2 triumph in the second
game of a twin bill after Chubby
Dean won the opener for the Indians,
2 to 1.
NEW YORK, May 5.- ()- A
balk by rookie Anton Karl with the
basses loaded in the last half of the
ninth inning gave the New York
Yankees the deciding run today in
a 4 to 3 victory over the Boston Red
Sox, who had tied the score with a
two-run flurry in the top half of the
frame.

- I

advantages, however, Saturday
should not see any pushover for the
Wolverines, by any means. Ohio still
has seasoned runners on hand who
may turn the trick.
These are led by Dallas Dupre,
NCAA broad jump champion. Dupre
has leaped 24' 8". In February's in-
door meet here he was expected to
break the Field House record, but a
leg injury received at the Michigan
State Relays the week before pre-
vented him from doing so.
Besides the broad jump, Dupre is
a point-getter in the low hurdles and
dashes. He was second in the lows
in both the Ohio meet and the Con-
ference last year, and also took sec-
ond place in the 220 dash.
One of the highly anticipated fea-
tures of this Saturday will be the low
hurdle race between Dupre and
Michigan's Chuck Pinney. Pinney
captured the 60-yard lows in the
Indoor Conference last March; in
fact, he never lost a race all season.
Warren Jones, a consistent place-
winner in the half-mile, will also be
present, together with the Buckeyes'
Hatfield, who has been dangerous in
the sprints this season and may be
ready for a first place Saturday.

Golfers Play
Second Match
With Spartans
Michigan's golf team will go to
East Lansing Saturday to meet Mich-
igan State's linksmen in the second
match of the season between the two
schools.
Wolverines handily defeated the
Spartans, 121/-21/2, in the matches
here two weeks ago. Captain Ben
Smith beat George Zimmerman,
State's number one man, 2%-1.
Bonisteel and Ludolph each captured
three points from their opponents.
Hicks, another Spartan, made only
1/ point off Bob Fife, and John Leidy
tied his rival, Jim Davis, 12-11/2.
Michigan State linksmen did not
gain any points in the reserve match-
es, going down to a 12-0 defeat at
the hands of the Wolverine's alter-
nates.
Coach Ben Van Alstyne's Spartan
team has looked promising this year,
but has not been the strong group
that faced the Maize and Blue in
past years.
This match scheduled for Saturday
will be a prelude to the one with
Ohio State here Monday. It will
afford the Wolverines more practice
in actual competition before they
meet the powerful Buckeyes in their
third Big Ten match. The Michigan
golfers will be seeking their first
Conference victory at that time.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
Ohio U. 12, Ohio State 1.
Camp Grant 12, Chicago 1.

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Cleveland 2-2, Chicago 1-5 (secondj
game, 11 innings).
* * *
NATIONAL LEAGUE

N

I

Brooklyn ......
St. Louis......
*Pittsburgh .
Boston ......,..
*Cincinnati
New York ...,..
Chicago .......
Philadelphia

W L
,.... 10 3
. 7 5
,... . 7 5
,.. ,. 5 5
....,. 6 6
.5 8
4 8
3 7

Pct.
.769
.583
.583
.500
.500
.385
.333
.300

r 570 . i-d, 7-..ON

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AUfP-A1 I
CL.OT IER RRS
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119 SOUTH MAIN STREET, ANN ARBOR

S

*Playing night game.
Brooklyn 18, Philadelphia 6.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati (night
game).
Chicago 2, St. Louis 1.
New York 5-7, Boston 1-3.

in the total average cost of
WAR PRODUCTION

m

19 have a date

Aahte

11 4

dsp
Saturday,
'Music Dy

si ; 7

:on 4Th
r

/
/
- \
11

Iii ~ ~ ,::..--- .-.

IF YOU TORE off one small corner of a dollar bill; that
would give you some idea of the cost of the electricity
used in manufacturing war products. Only 1I/z per cent of
the total cost of war production, on the average, goes for
electricity: 981 per cent goes for materials, labor, plant
and equipment, etc.
Yet electricity plays a most important part in turning out
tanks and planes and guns and ships, and the thousand-
and-one other weapons of war. Without electric power,
scarcely a wheel would turn in any factory or arsenal or
shipyard in America. Not a piece of armament would be
produced, not a bullet cast, not a shell turned.
Electricity makes possible the machine tools used to build
other machines. It powers the huge rollers in steel mills.
It runs high-speed precision lathes, and giant presses, and
drills, and milling and grinding machines, and motors for
countless factory jobs. It melts alloy steels in the electric
furnace-steels used for armor plate and tanks and guns.
With induction heating, it point-hardens armor-piercing
shells, and makes tough, wear-resistant parts for motors
and airplane engines.
Electric power is doing a vital war job at low cost. And it

May

8th

Sawyer

9:00 to 12:00

4

a

I

I

:.: I II

III

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