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May 06, 1943 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rA tr 0

Tun M H-1-. i~T

_ _

U.S. Assistance to Russia
Totals 3,500,000 Tons

President R ?views

Watler-Crossing Demioonstration on His Tour

Brown Hits Use of B and C Cards;
Vacation Permits Asked by Kelly

WASHINGTON, May 5.-(1P)-The
United States has sent Russia "sev-
eral thousand planes," "many tens
of thousands" of trucks, jeeps and
other military vehicles, and over one
million tons of foodstuffs.
This was disclosed today by lend-
lease administrator Edward R. Stet-
tinius, Jr., in his most detailed report
on the extent of this country's assis-
tance to Russia. Altogether, ship-
ments up to April 1 aggregated 3,-
500,000 long tons,,he said, and were
valued at $1,825,477,000. A long ton
is 2,240 pounds.
In the first three months of 1943
shipments were 35 per cent greater
than in the preceding quarter, and
more than twice the total shipped in
the corresponding period of 1942,
The overwhelming majority of
lend-lease shipments have reached
Russia, Stettinius said, adding that
losses were suffered principally on
the north Russian route, and a large
proportion of the supplies are moving
by the Persian Gulf route.
The lend-lease administrator re-

ported that among other items sent
to Russia were:
Thousands of tons of steel and
armor plate, copper, brass, alumin-
um, zinc, TNT, toluol and other
chemicals, large quantities of rail-
road rail, signal and other communi-
cations equipment, and smaller quan-
tities of electric furnaces, presses,
forging hammers, and other machine
tools.
Along with aircraft and motor ve-
hicles, food shipments now hold the
top priority, Stettinius said. Most
lend-lease shipments of dehydrated
vegetables are going to Russia along
with wheat flour, sugar, canned
meats, dried peas and beans, lard and
vegetable oils. So that the Russians
may produce food in newly-developed
agricultural areas, this country also
has shipped 8,000 tons of seeds.
Divided as to value, shipments in-
clude: ordnance, $280,891,000; air-
craft, $328,975,000; tanks, $179,820,-
000; motor vehicles, $229,822,000;
watercraft, $27,888,000; industrial
products, $461,348,000, and agricul-
tural products, $316,733,000.

Watching from the front seat of his car, Presiden t Roos velt witnesses a water-crossing demonstration
.at Camp Carson. Colo., on April 24 as members of th e 89th Infantry Division show coordinated use of am-
Sphibiouszjeeps, assault boats and rafts. Smoke is use Ji t screen movement.

,YAssIE ADVERTISIN]

. .... r.. -.. -. . ..., Y.. .. .. r. ,. , r, ...-,. ,n.__

1f.

HOPE FOR TOMORROW: 'rive for UJA
Baccaloni Is Optimistic About IFund Extended
The Future of Classie Opera U Q aif $1,000 S

WASHINGTON, May 5.- (AP)- A
nation-wide campaign to enforce the
ban on use of B and C gasoline ra-
tions for pleasure driving was an-
nounced today by Prentiss M. Brown,
director of the Office of Price Ad-
ministration.
The campaign is directed only
against the non-e~sential use of
these supplemental rations. There is
no restriction on the use of A book
rations.
B and C book holders, if found
driving for pleasure, may be re-
quired to show that they are doing
so on their A ration.
Every effort will be made to detect
violators, Brown said, "and not only
to revoke their present rations but
to suspend their right to any further
rations for an appreciable time."
Public Health
School To Open
(Continued from Page 1)
priority one year ago to obtain the
gleaming'copper fixtures of this bac-
terial dining room.
Also of a laboratory nature is the
department of environmental health,
where santitary engineers will be
trained in water, milk, food, sewage,
rodent, housing, and insect control
management. Industrial health lab-
oratories are equipped to duplicate
exactly conditions associated with in-
dustrial processes. Both animals and
humans will be observed in their re-
actions to gases, fumes, solvents and
chemicals suspected of toxicity.
On the non-technical side of the
new school is a large circular library,
paneled in "antiqued" pine from top
to bottom.
There is a health education muse-
um; an outdoor class and recreation
room on the roof; a kitchen and din-
ing room for faculty lunches; a
circular auditorium for 200.
In this glorified academic atmos-
phere candidates for Master and
Doctor of Public Health degrees will
concentrate in fields of public health
administration, education, nursing,
dentistry, economics, nutrition, sta-
tistics, tropical diseases, epidemiol-
ogy, virology, engineering and indus-
trial health. Student registrations
have been limited to 200.
Although the building will not be
completed before July 1, it will be
opened Monday for the 12 day In-
stitute on Public Health Economics

WASHINGTON, May 5.- )A-
Governor Harry F. Kelly of Michigan
declared tonight he is conlident that
war agency officials l:ue sympathetic
toward his proposal to ease travel
restrictions to permit mi t of h fam-
ily car for vacation trips his sum-
mer.
In the back uf lis mind, Kelly said
before leaving 'the capital tonight, is
.certified vacations." Under this
plan, war workers and their families
would be allotted gasoline adequate
for a trip to vacation spots.
MIGHTY ,DRAMA-

CLASSIFIED
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for j
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)j
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more (lays. (In-
crease of $.25 for each
additional 5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request j
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Brown zipper notebook. Con-
tents important. Reward. C. Ta-
ber, Martha Cook, 2-3225.-
PLEASE RETURN theme in stolen
English book back to Michigan
League Ladies' Lounge. Need theme
badly; forget about book.
TYPING
MISS ALLEN - Experienced typist.
408 South Fifth Avenue. 2-2935.
HELP WANTED
GIRL for general office work-no
experience needed. Good starting
salary and excellent opportunity
for advancement. Dixie Shops, 125j
West Michigan Avenue, Ypsilanti,
Ypsilanti 2650.

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING -Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State.
WANTED: Used clothes. Best prices
paid. Ben the Tailor, 122 E. Wash-
ington St. Phone 5387 after 6 p.m.
WASHEp SAND AND GRAVEr-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
TYPEWRITERS of all makes. Of-
fice and portable models. Bought,
rented, repaired. Student and Of-
fice Supplies. O. D. Morrill, 314
South State St. Phone 6615.
WANTED
WANTED-Boys for dish washing.
Please call Mrs. Rawles, Sorosis-
2-3279.
WANTED-Three desirable May Fes-
tival tickets for Saturday after-
noon concert-Notify Helen Briggs,
559 Jordan.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Log Log Duplex Deci-
trig slide rule. Perfect condition.
$11 cash. Call Richard Bruns-
4017.
FOR SALE: 35 mm. FILM LOADS.
IDENTIFICATION PHOTOS. For
36-hour service come to 802 Pack-
ard from 6:30 to 7:30 weekdays.

et

I

A

R{

K{

0

W

SHIRTS TIES + HANDKERCHIEFS UNDERWEAR SPORT SHIRTS
The same fine style and quality
in new Spring colors.
Veal rea t

By MARY RONAY
Between fervent motions of his
hands and rapid-fire conversations
in Italian with his manager, Salva-
tore Baccaloni, world famous basso
buffo, yesterday expressed an opti-
mistic future-for the classic opera.
"The modernists are so afraid that
the critics are going to say that their
operas are based on the classic form,"
Baccaloni declared, "that they have
gone back to the theory of composi-
tion. Their music is then without
melody-there is no emotional ap-
peal."
With dramatic gestures to his
heart and to his head, Baccaloni said
that classic opera will always remain
popular because it touches the feel-
ings of the audience. People want
melody, music that will live for them.
"The modernists have not done this,"
he continued.
Although Baccaloni's English vo-
cabulary is limited to such phrases
as "good morning," "good after-
noon" and "I don't speak English
very well," he was able through his
manager and by the quick move-
ments of his face and hands to put
understandable emphasis to what he
was saying.
Especially was this so when Bacca-
loni described his visit to Fort Reilly.
He said he wanted to ride in a tank,
but just wasn't able to squeeze his
300 pounds into one. A jeep was
finally compromised on to give him
a taste of Army transportation. At
this moment, Baccaloni bounced him-
self up and down on the Union couch
to show exactly what had happened.
Baccaloni has given many per-
formances before soldiers ' and for
various relief organizations. He has
his own company and with Bacca-
loni joining the cast give selected
acts from favorite operas. Because
he studied to be an architect and
has done a lot of painting, Bacca-
loni designed all the sets and equip-
ment for his productions.
"I am very grateful at this time
of war that I am qualified to be a
comic character," Baccaloni said.
"It is very hard to entertain soldiers,
some acts that you would think would
be popular don't come off. That they
were able to laugh at me justifies the
roles I play."
His manager then explained that
Baccaloni had gotten expressions
down to such an art that even the
stern Mitropoulos had to laugh. Bac-
caloni started a grim rehearsal with
the famous conductor who in his
usual serious fashio4 was concentrat-
ing on the selection. Mitropoulos
turned to give him a cue and then
Second Geolog!oy,
Course Opens
Women Trained to Fill
Openings in Oil Industry
Increasing demand for trained per-
sonnel to fill vacancies in the Ameri-
can petroleum industry has prompted
the University to open a second sec-
tion of the concentrated course in
petroleum geology June 14. Prof.
K. K. Landes, chairman of the de-
partment, announced yesterday.
This compact one-year program
was first offered by the University
last February and is designed pri-
marily for women. The group now
being trained will fill less than half
of the vacancies in the field, accord-
ing to Prof. Landes.
Although designed for women, the
course in petroleum geology is also
open to men with a 4F draft classifi-
cation. Requirements include one
year's work in physical and historical
geology, trigonometry and a "B"

C(ahquhifr for 1943 -44
SUMMfER SESTSON
June 14, Monday ...... Summer courses in the School of Forestry
and Conservation at Camp Filibert Roth,
Golden Lake, Iron County, begin.
June 14, Monday ......Field courses in Geology and Suruveying at
Camp Davis, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, begin.
June 24-26, Thursday-Saturday ........ Registration by alphabetical
schedule.
June 28, Monday ......Session begins in Schools and Colleges, at the
Biological Station, Douglas Lake, Cheboygan,
and at the National Music Camp, Interlochen.
July 5, Monday ........................ For Fourth of July, holiday.
August 6, Friday ......Session ends in the Medical school (six-week
courses).
August 7, Saturday ....Session ends in the School of Education (six-
week courses).
August 16-20, Monday-Friday.......Entrance examinations for the
fall term.
August 20, Friday .....Session ends in other Schools and Colleges and
in Medical School (eight week courses) and
in School of Education (eight-week courses).
August 21, Saturday....... Session ends at the Biological Station and
at the National Music Camp.
September 3, Ft-iday .. .. ............ Session ends at Camp Davis.
October 1, Friday .............. Session ends at Camp Filibert Roth.
SUMMER TERM
June 1-4, Tuesday-Friday .................Entrance examinations.
June 7, Monday .......Term begins in Medical School and School of
Dentistry.
June 23-26, Wednesday-Saturday .. .Orientation Period for freshmen.
June 24-26, Thursday-Saturday ........ Registration by alphabetical
schedule.
June 28, Monday ......... Term begins in other Schools and Col-
leges and in the Basic Curriculum in the
Division of Emergency Training.
September 25, Saturday . .Tel'm ends for Medical School and School
of Dentistry.
October 16, Saturday ......erm ends for other Schools and Colleges.
December 18, Saturday ............ Term ends for Basic Curriculum.
FALL TERM
October 19-23, Tuesday-Saturday .. .Orientation Period for freshmen.
October 25, Monday ............................. .....Term begins.
February 19, Saturday ................................Term ends.
SPRING TERM
February 28, Monday ................................Term begins.
June 17, Saturday ....................................Term ends.

There will be an important
meeting of the Gargoyle Business
Staff at 4:00 p.m. today.

wmmmh

catching one of Baccaloni's expres-
sions burst out laughing with such
vigor that he wasn't able to go on
conducting.
This was Baccaloni's first appear-
ance in Ann Arbor, and he encoun-
tered only one difficulty with the
local environment-the same trouble'
that Mrs. Rachmaninoff had last
year. The trouble was in the person
of George, the conscientious door-
keeper at the Union. Although Bac-
caloni's wife tried to explain that
she wasn't an offensive character,
she had to learn the hard and fast
rules of this institution.

In National Canmpaign
To complete tabulation and make
further contacts. the United Jewish
Appeal Drive now being conducted
on campus was extended five days,
chairman Herb Levin, '43M, said
yesterday.
According to the original plan the
drive was to have ended yesterday,
but Levin pointed out the need of
additional contacts to insure fulfill-
ment of the campus quota of $1,000.
Campaign captains reported at a
meeting yesterday at Hillel that the
drive has passed the half way mark.

aw
NEE 184 -
S T R E E T A T L IB

S T A T E

BE RT Y

N.

WAR BONDS ISSUED HE!
ContlnuouS Shows
from 1 P.M.

DAY OR NIGHT

A' . A.. f'. f A'ffA

BA
A di
leag
and

NOW! STARTS TODAY
ILLED-J SEBALL
zzy dame puts the skids on the team's
ue standing .,.till the wives step in
start swinging?
fI
A SHRIEKING PEEK
at home life be-
19d

. t
Tom is an expeditor for a New Jersey war plant. All day
long, he contacts suppliers and subcontractors by Long
Distance.
''Are the castings ready?. . . OK New Orleans."
"Hello Detroit, have those parts been shipped?"
"Have you received the brass yet, Atlanta?"
Urgent war calls like Tom's are crowding Long Distance
lines,'round the clock. And the load is increasing daily.
Won't you help us give war calls the right of' way by ob-
serving these simple rules.
1. M ke only necessary Long Distance calls.
2. If you must call, plan your conversation.

"She falls for any man who
wears tn Arrow Tier"

nn nome prarel
with
LUPE EDDIE
VELEZ -ALBERT.
Patsy Kelly Max Baer - Jerome Cowan
P,,od.d by B,,, oy 0 ;,reed by Ll i ,,eGodwin,
Sceen Play by Charles ELRoberts n Done Lussler

Nothing looks so well on a male chest as an Arrow
Tie. Arrow ties are bias ciut for perfect-knotting
and wrinkle-resisting.. The fabrics (whether khaki,
Jpalck, or crimson and gold) are top quality, the
I.A dvnl in i tjnr eae,-veti. e ue t

11

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