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March 03, 1943 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MW"NWIAV-:- MAR"U3* 10441.

rI Ij UIA.akL.

VAGIE XHEE

_ _.-.. --F . - ..

etitioning

for

Freshman

Project*

To

Begin

w 4>

Soldiers To Attend Slide Rule Ball

Engineers Only May Procure
Tickets Today and Tomorrow
By official, permission from Col.
Ganoe, all men who will be stationed
in barracks starting March 8 may'
atterxd the Annual Slide Rule Ball
which will be held Friday, March 12,
at the Union.
Tickets for the annual ball will be
on sale for engineers only from 10
a.m. to noon and from 2 p.m. to 4
4i.m. today and tomorrow on the sec-
rnd floor over the West Engineering
Arch and the first floor of the East
Engineering Building.
Campus Sale To Be Friday
Starting Friday, the sale will be
thfrown open to the rest of the cam-
pus and tickets may be purchased at
the Union desk. The dance has been
a.complete sell-out within five days
in other years.
The feature attraction of the eve-
ning will be Jan Savitt's orchestra.
Savitt, the originator of "Shuffle I

Rhythm" has appeared in Ann Arbor
twice before, the last time being two
years ago when he played in a swing
concert in the Field House. He has
appeared at numerous famed thea-
ti'es throughout the country as well.
The theme of the dance is based
on St. Patrick's Day, and the Slide
Rule will have the customary central
place in'the decorations.
Committee Men Are Listed
Co-chairmen of the dance are Bill
Hutcherson, '43E, and Keith Smith,
'43E. Other members of the com-
mittee include Pete Wingate, '43E,
music; Bill Jacobs, '44E, and Bill
Sessions, '43E, patrons; Herb Heav-
enrith, '43E, and George Snow, '44E,
publicity; Ken Moehl, '44E, and
George Sloane, '43E, decorations; and
Carl Brenkert, '44E, tickets and pro-
grams.
The Sorority Committee of JGP
will meet at 4:30 p.m. today in the
Michigan League.

Eight Positions
On Committee
Will Be Filled
Frosh To Entertain at Party
For Soldiers Stationed Here
in Place of Annual Dance
Petitioning for the eight central
positions on freshman project will
begin today and continue through
Monday, March 8, and will be open
to all eligible second semester fresh-
men.
Along with all other class under-
takings, this project will be entirely
devoted to the war effort, for the
freshman women have been placed in
charge of providing entertainment
for the soldiers stationed here on
campus.
Ch irman To Head Committee
The eight positions that will make
up the central committee of the pro-
ject will include that of general
chairman, head of finance, social sec-
retary, publicity chairman, hostesses
chairman,' chairman of entertain-
ment and two assistant entertain-
ment chairmen.
Petitions may be obtained in the
undergraduate office of the League
and must be turned in before 5 p.m.
Monday. Interviewing will be held
from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday,
March 9 to Friday, March 12.
Games for Soldiers
Various rooms in the League will
be turned over to this work, and
games will be set up to entertain the
soldiers. All detailed plans will be
formulated by the freshman women
themselves, however.
In addition to the members of the
central committee, numerous other
freshman women will be needed to
act as hostesses, and to work on con-
mittees. These will be given an op-
portunity to sign up at the first mass
meeting called by the central com-
mittee.

F, -l

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
-- - - - - - - --t

Women TUrged
To Be Nurses
y ean Lloyd
Choice of Several Programs
Is Offered to College-Trained
Women Entering Profession
Michigan coeds were urged by Dean
Alice C. Lloyd in a statement given
to The Daily yesterday to enter theI
nursing profession in order to meet
the growing war needs.
Dean Lloyd stressed the importanceI
of post-war reconstruction and the
specialized responsibilities in the nur-
sing field which require, college-
trained women. Because of this and
because a student nurse is helping in
the war as soon as she goes into a
hospital, Dean Lloyd asked that no
woman hold back, because the war,
might be over before she graduates.
Nursing Programs Named
At present a number of programs
are being offered to any prospective,
nurse. The first is the standard
three-year course based upon high
Miss Thelma I. Scratch, recruit-
er for the Michigan Nursing Coun-
cil for War Service, will be in the
War Information Center of the
League from 2 p.m. to pm. to-
day and tomorrow to give infor-
nation on war nursing. A film,
"R. N. - Serving All Mankind",
will be shown by her tomorrow at
4:30 p.m. in the Rackham Build-
ing auditorium.
school graduation and leading to the
diploma in nursing. The second- is
the standard three-year course in
nursing based upon two years of col-
lege work, leading to the bachelor's
degree in nursing.
The third is the standard three-
year "program, based upon a bache-
lor's degree and leading to the degree
of Master of Nursing. Yale Uni-
versity School of Nursing and the
Frances Payne Bolton School ofnNur-
sing of Western Reserve University
are the only two university schools
who have this last program.
Combined Course Possible
Combined curricula are possible
which allow students to be accepted
in the professional school who have
completed two or more years of work
in a junior college or a regular four-
year college. This may include cour-
ses closely related to the professional

65,000 NURSES
Are Needed Now
In War Emergency
T HE NURSING PROFESSION is one which has great peacetime sig-
nificance. In wartime it is second only in importance to the armed
forces, in fact it becomes part of the armed forces and is called on for
active service with them. In time of war also, civilian health becomes
a major concern since essential production and community well-being
are vitally important.
Now this profession, which is peculiarly a woman's profession, is
unable to meet the increased demands. It needs 65,000 recruits for the
coming year. It needs college-trained women 'because positions of
great responsibility are going to be available in war work, in industry,
in public health, in admiinistration.
THERE ARE several war services for women of which the future
after the war is uncertain. Nursing is going to be as important in
reconstruction and rehabilitation as in war and there will be many
developments in Europe and in South America as well as in this coun-
try where young women with language ability and administrative
ability and a nurse's training will be needed in public health work and
nursing education.
No young woman should hesitate to go into training because she
thinks the war will be over before she graduates. She is in active war
work as soon as she enters the hospital for her training and if the war
should be a short one, which seems unlikely, the reconstruction period
is going to be long, and nurses are going to be especially needed then.
The nursing profession combines the practical use of scientific
knowledge with experience in wor king with people to promote their
well-being. It is a great profession for women and one in which all
women should feel a pride and a very real interest.
Alice C. Lloyd,
Dean of Women

Today
Ruthvens Will Hold
Third Tea of Term
For Students Today
President and Mrs. Alexander
Ruthven will be at home from 4 p.m.
to 6 p.m. today to g ret students at
the third Ruthven tea of the semes-
ter.
Mrs. Hazel Overton of Jordan Hall,
Mrs. Pilcher of Alpha Delta Pi, and
Mrs. Burton of Allen-Rumsey House
will preside at the tea table.
The guests who are especially in-
vited are the residents of Jordan Hall,
Alpha Delta Pi. Alpha Epsilon Phi.
Acacia, Delta Upsilon, Greene House,
Allen-Rumsey House and Phi Gam-
ma Delta.

GU I OMAR
NOYAES
BRAZILIAN
PIANIST

CLASSIFIED
RATES

.)

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. * Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
TYPING
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.

Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for,.
one or two. days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words-)
Contract Rates on Request
H ELP WANTED
BOOKKEEPER WANTED to handle
small set of books. Good oppor-
tunity. Follett's Michigan Book-
store. 322 S. State.
WANTED
WANTED: Man's lightweight bicy-
cle. Call 3683 after 8:30 p.m.
MAKE MONEY-on your used cloth-
ing by phoning Clautde II. Broiwn,
2-2736, 512 S. Main.
WANTED: Used clothes. Best prices
paid. Ben the Tailor, 122 E. Wash-
ii gton St. Phone 5387 after 6 p.m.
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St.' Phone 6615

LOST and FOUND

LOST-Class ring. Initials inside-
M.A.O. Call 6760.
LOST-Maroon Parker pen near
Main Library. Reward, phone
2-4200.
LOST-Three-strand pearl bracelet
on campus. Phone 2-3392. Leila
Anderson.
LOST-Dobbs hat with initials J.F.M.
Reward. 819 E. University. Phone
Jack, 2-1147.
LOST Saturday-Notebook of experi-
ments. Name, Bassani, on cover.
Call 8615 after seven.
COST--Shell glasses, semi-harlequin.
Lost on Washtenaw, Diagonal, or
S., University. Please call Pat Mc-
Graw, 2-2218.
MISCELLANEOUS
PARTY PHOTOGRAPHS and IN-
FORMAL PORTRAITS by appoint-
ment only. Phone 2-4726.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
TYPEWRITERS of all makes. Of-
fice and portable models. Bought,
rented, repaired. Student and Of-
fice Supplies.t0. D. Morrill, 314
South State St. Phone 6615.

WAA will hold a leadership pro-
gram for all women interested in
petitioning for offices on the exec-
utive board or as sports managers
from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow
at Barbour gym. All women, irre-
spective of class or experience in
WAA activities, are urged to at-
tend, since the fundamentals of
WAA work will be explained in
full at that time.
Coeds Can Become
Bandage Instructors
Coeds who have put in a minimum
of six hours work at the surgical
dressing unit may become instruc-
tors, providing their work is passed
on by a regular Red Cross instructor.3
Those coeds who qualify will be
given a regulation Red Cross head-
dress. It has also been decided that
a Red Cross button will be awarded
any coed who has worked 50 hours
at the unit.
The houses that are especially in-
vited to attend the unit tomorrow
include Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Gan-
ma, Jordan Hall, zone III and zone
IV. Alumnae House, Gamma Phi
Beta, Alpha Delta Pi, zone V and
zone VI will be special guests on
Friday. The unit as open from 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. in the game room of the
League.

or actual three-year nursing pro-
gram, or the tWo parts may be quite
separate. Thy latter is better for
the student who is undecided about
entering nursing, or who is in college
and wants to answer the plea for
more nurses during the war.
Schemes for accelerating the nurs-
ing program include summer term
hospital courses that may be taken
while the student is still in preiclinical
work. There is also the possibility
that senior students in nursing
schools may be sent to military hos-
pitals to complete their final months
of clinical experience.
Nursing combined with a college
education offers many opportunities
in foreign reconstruction work to the
language student, and executive posi-j
House Exercises
TO Start Anew
Every residence house will start
with a clean slate this semester in
the Physical Fitness exercise pro-
gram, sponsored by the Women's
Athletic Association.
A new phase in the project was
marked with the tacking up of a
unique chart on which bi-weekly pro-
gress of the houses will be recorded.
Imposing, on the north wall of the
League lobby, the chart is white with
a red, white and blue border.
t Every Michigan woman will help
her house record when she gives her
daily fifteen minutes to exercising.
A point is given each participant for
every time she exercises, and as a
reward for consistency, an extra
point will be given for attendance at
five consecutive exercise periods.
House athletic directors will report
at 5 p.m. every other Friday to the
Barbour gymnasium where they will
hand in their house records. At this
time new exercises will be demon-
strated.
Committee in charge of the pro-
gram is headed by Shelby Dietrich,
'45 chairman for the second semes-
ter. Assisting her is Carol Grede,
'44, publicity and Helen Garrels, '44.
Exercise heads for league houses, sor-
orities and dormitories respectively
are Monna Heath, '44; Doris Kimball,
'43, and Patricia Coulter,, '45.

tions such as hospitalsuperintending,
personnel direction and nursing in-
structorships require background
training in nutrition bacteriology,
epidimiology, psychology and sociol-
ogy. Public health nursing is a
growing opening for thousands of
specialized nurses.
House Presidents'
Meeting To Be Held
The Red Cross Membership Drive
will get under way at 4 p.m. today at
a house presidents' meeting which
will be held in the Grand Rapids
Room of the League.
If for any reason the president of
a house is unable to attend herself,
it has been requested by Geraldine
Stadelman, '44, head of the drive,
that she send a representative.
War Bonds Issued Here!
.+eNN ATow s Nw rr TEAiC

FR I., MAR. 5, 8:30
(Instead of Detroit Orchestra-
Please use Ticket No. 9)
NELSON
EDDY.

Ill

OPENING TONIGHT!!

MICHIGAN
Ending Today!

i

.'' ' ...*..*._.. . *. s

Hedy IAMR
as primattve TONDELAYO!
Waltr FIDiGEON.
as the man who tamed her!
Frank MORGAN
Richard
CARLSON
Reginald
OWEN
Heary

it

I
I

To Hold Riding*
Cub Tryouts
Riding casually along shady trails
in spring is the fate of members of
Crop and Saddle Club and the Uni-
versity Women's Riding Club, try-
outs for which organizations will be
held at 5 p.m. today at the Stables.
Those attending are to meet just
before 5 p.m. at Barbour gym, where
transportation will be provided to
the event. Heading Crop and Saddle,
one of the oldest WAA groups, in
which members must be fairly expert
riders, is Sybil Graham, '43.
Newly organized this year is the
U. W: R. C., which is a group for less-
skilled riders than those in the older
club. Patricia Coulter, '44, is acting,
president.
PlanS are already being formulated
for the annual Crop and Saddle
Horse Show, held regularly in May,
and both clubs will participate in
main events. Regular Crop and Sad-
dle meetings are held at 5 p.m. on
Wednesdays, and members of the
U. W. R. C. ride at 1 p.m. Saturdays
for about an hour.
Water Repellent
W1ind Resistant
All Weather
yO
THREE-QUARTER
FINGER-TIP
and REGULAR LENGTH
Weather Proofed
SHELTER
COAT
Button and Zipper Front

-Last Times Today -
RMMIESTPICTURENWM')
BansEVER SCAIIEQ STIFF INI

~W6M 'S LAUGH W,1T
WHmvInST U NG
ICN DIXIE
ANNRUTHERFORD GORGEBANCROFT
GUY DIANA PETER
KI6BEE *"LEWIS - WHITNEY
M "Mask of Nippon"
Picture People
World News
- Coming Thursday -
CLARE BOOTH LUCE'S
"MARGIN FOR ERROR"
with JOAN BENNETT

W-VED.,MAR. 17, 8:30
Pickets, with tax,
$2.75 - $2.20 - $1.65
At University Musical
Society, Burton Tower

i

________________________________ 14

I

I

DELUXE SANDWICHES
FOUNTAIN SPECIALS
Featuring Delicious Malteds
Open Sunday 7-12 P.M.
Week Days and Saturdays 9-12 P.M.
Three Doors NOOKI of State Theater

I

1 1 , lI I

1111 ULL I J I16 L l l%<, y':,; , '.:, :'- ;::41'%

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