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December 10, 1942 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-12-10

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P&C-ETWr

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THLMSDA, DEC-l(Dn !42

,;..

MOVIE PREVIEWS

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
THURSDAY, DEC. 14, 1942
VOL. LIII No. 57
All notices for the Daily official Bul-

lasts Pair
i Rs od Pers
(Conitiled frori Page 1)

CONDUCTOR PREDICTS:
Shostakovich War Symphony'
Will Endure, Koussevitzky Says

Post-War Aid
for Conquered
Areas Planned

.

t

At the State.. .
Streamlined to match the tempo
of the times, one of America's most
beloved tales, "Mrs. Wiggs of the
Cabbage Patch," has been brought
to the screen by Paramount with Fay
Bainter, Hugh Herbert, Carolyn Lee
and Vera Vague in the leading roles.
The film comes to the State Theatre
today.
.Fay Bainter, of course, portrays
the eternally optimistic Mrs. Wiggs
with :Vera Vague of the rac~o, as the
fluttery maiden lady, Tabitha Hazy.
Hugh Herbert in the role of Marcus
Throckmorton, proprietor of a matri-
monial agency, is responsible for
miich of the film's frolicsome fun.
The Wiggs brood, the most lovable
family of that strange shantytown
"over the tracks," the Cabbage Patch,
has dainty Carolyn Lee, freckled Carl
"Alfalfa" Switzer and Betty Brewer,
as the children, and Harry Shannon
as Mr. Wiggs.

At the Michigan... I
The heat is really on for Henry
Aldrich in his-newest movie misad-
venture, "Henry Aldrich, Editor,"
which opens today at the Michigan
Theatre with Jimmy Lydon as Henry.
The film tells the laugh-packed
story of Henry's experiences as editor
of the high school paper. His troubles
stem from the fact that he believes
that by sensationalizing outside news,
he can increase the school paper's
circulation. As a result, the owner of
a store in which there was an unim-
portant little fire, brings suit against
the school because Henry, in the pa-
per, has practically accused him of
arson.
Henry himself is later arrested for
arson and brought to trial. How he
gets out of this prize predicament is
said to provide more laughs and ex-
citement than any previous Aldrich
escapade.

Freeticket with every Bond purchased
IBUY BONDS F here to December 13th.

letin are to be sent to~the Office of the I ed upon returning to the wheelhouse.
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica- truck agi in the orcedto he
tion, except on Saturday when tihe no- src gi ntelg ocdt h
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m. deck, he refused to leave the action,
continuing to issue orders to the crew..
Notices While the Navy gun crew concen-
trated on the heavily armed small
Applicants for Enlisted Reserve: All raider, the Navy said, Second Mate
students between the ages of 18 and Joseph E. Layman, Louisville, Ky.,
now missing, poured shells into the
38 who have filed applications for larger raider from a forward gun. -
any of the enlisted reserve programs In the battered superstructure Ra-
on or before Dec. 5, 1942, must com- dio Operator Hudson A. Hewey of
plete their enlistment before Dec. 15. Washington, stayed at his post.
Any such students who have yet to 1Teotgne ecata a
obtain papers or documents necessary T .he out-gunned merchantman was
for enlistment should do so as quickly hit frcm stem to stern by four salvos.
as possible. The War Board Enlist- The large guns of the smaller raider
ment Office, The Health Service, the apparently were fired together from
ROTC and NROTC will exert every a central control system. One main
effort to accomplish these enlistments boiler was hit, and the ship's speed
before the 15th. was reduced to 1 knot; other shells
-B. D. Thuma struck the radio master and destroyed
Armed Forces Faculty Adviser the aerial; the steering engine room
__was hit by shrapnel and incendiary
Christmas recess:, By action of the shells; the main deckhouse was set
Regents the announced time of the afire. The ship was slowly flooding
Christmas recess has been changed from numerous hits below the water
to the following: Christmas recess line, but her guns continued to blaze
begins Friday evening, December 18; defiance.
classes resume after recess on Finally a direct shell hit on the
Wednesday morning, December 30. magazine put the after gun out of
Classes will be held on January 1. action. But Ensign Willat had his
The above changes are occasioned by final blows. Five shells were not ex-
transportation conditions during the ploded by the hit. He personally load-
holiday season. . ed and fired them befofe going to the
(Continued on Page 3) boat deck to aid in lowering boats and
cutting away life rafts. "No one re-
There will be a meeting of the members seeing him afterwards," the
Gargoyle Business Staff at 4:45 Navy said.
p.m. today. It is very important Reluctantly Captain Buck, listed as
that all attend, missing, gave the order to abandon
ship.
CLASSIFIED, AVERTL JNG

By HENRY PETERSEN
"The Shostakovich Seventh Sym-
phony is great music on the basis of
its magnificent depth and power and
excellent musical workmanship
alone.".
With these words, Dr. Serge Kous-
sevitzky yesterday gave his answer to
the charge that the "War Symphony"
has received such great interest be-
cause of its political significance and
emotional appeal rather than because
it is great music.
Speaking backstage in Hill Audi-
torium just before the sixth Choral
Union Concert, Dr. Koussevitzky as-
serted that, "Aside from the fact that
it embodies Russian political ideology,
it is a great work which will take a
certain place in the world's musical
literature."

ionization of the orchestra's mem-
bers.
"The orchestra will go on the air
at 8:00 p.m. each Saturday begin-
ning Dec. 26," a companion said. "It,
will be broadcast over a national
hook-up including 144 stations."'
On entering Hill Auditorium's stage
entrance, Dr. Koussevitzky stepped
up to waiting Dr. Charles A. Sink,
president of the University Musical
Society, and kissed him on the cheek
in old world fashion.
Speaking with \a soft accent, the
Russian-born conductor greeted Dr.
Sink in renewal of a 12-year acquain-
tance begun in 1930when the Boston
orchestra first -came to Ann Arbor.

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
R ETURNE-D BY POPULAR REQUEST!

in'

Earlier, and answering questions;
only with nods of his head as he
walked through the cold night air
from the League to Hill Auditorium,
the conductor affirmed that the Bos-
ton orchestra will soon begin radio}
broadcasts as a result of recent un-

"DUCK SOUP"

e.13,
7.9

WASHINGTON, ~Dec. 9.- ()-
President Roosevelt and the Pacific
War Council developed today a pro-
gram to provide food and other civil-
ian aid to the peoples of Axis-con-
quered countries in order to speed
victory and post-war rehabilitation,
Lord Halifax, British Ambassador,
and Walter Nash, New Zealand's
minister, said this discussion head-
lined a broad survey of all types of
war problems, including the status of
Adniral Darlan in North Africa, the
supply needs of China, and battle
problems.
The United States already has ap-
pointed a director for Foreign Relief
and Rehabilitation, Herbert H. Leh-
man.

STA R T I NG
TODAY!

44NARBORSNEI9f ST THFATA'f

Lydia.Mendelssohn Theatre
Box Office Opens Tickets 40c
2 P.M. Sunday Series Tickets are
Good for this Performance.

A

I

TYPING

FOR SALE

MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist. FOR SALE-Tuxedo. Size 37. Prac-
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935. tically new. Phone 5834 Evenings.

Extra Added

JAMES GLEASON "HAY FOOT"

LETTER FROM BATAAN

1l WORLD NEWS

i

Coming
Sunday!

"WAR AGAINST MRS. HADLEY"

DISTINGUISHED GIFTS
HER DREAM COME TRUE-Any
girl who finds one of those gorgeous
lounging robes under her Christ-
mas tree will really believe Santa
Claus has been there. They're from
$5.95. The Elizabeth Dillon Shop,
309 S. State, Phone 5605.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Woman to do relief cook-
ing Saturday and Sunday. 8 hours
per day. See Miss Steele, Health
Service Building.
WANTED-Stenographer to assist
Red Cross Field Director at Wayne
County Airport. Transportation
no problem. Salary $110.00 with
increase up to $140.00 based on
ability to handle work. North Hall,
North University Avenue, 5 to 6
p.m., Wed. and Thurs..
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
TYPING
MESS IAH
CHRISTMAS 2ERFORMANCE
Hardin Van Deursen
Conductor

IDENTIFICATION PHOTOGRAPHS
-any size. For one day serv.ice come
to 802 Packard. 6-7:30 week days.
CHRISTMAS CARDS-The largest
selection in town. All imprinted
with your name. From 50 for $1.00
up. Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
PERSONAL STATIONERY. - 100
sheets and envelopes, $1.00. Printed
with your name and address-
The Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
STOCKWELL & MOSHER-JORDAN
residents-Alterations on women's
garments promptly done. Opposite
Stockwell. Phone 2-2678.
LOST and FOUND
FOUND-A pair of rimless glasses
on Thursday--Inquire Radio &
Record Shop.
LOST-Woman's black wallet, con-
taining twelve dollars, Saturday, on
campus. Reward. Rose Mary Eden,
1315 Hill St.

WANTED TO BUY

WANTED-One pair of men's skis,
approximately 62 feet. Ph. 5348.
k C H IGAN

With}IMMY
Sas H ENR Y D
RYALDRICH
Charles Smith " Rita Quigley
John Litel Olive Blakeney
SVaughanGlaser PICTURE

SUN., DEC 13, 3:00
PERFORMERS
Marjorie McClung, Soprano
Eileen Law, Contralto

v . ,v .F4"WA1 j faw wvr+

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