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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 05, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Avukah to Entertain
Group from Wayne
The Michigan chapter of Avukah,
student Zionist organization, will en-
tertain the Wayne University chapter
at an informal communal supper and
party at 6:30 p. in. Saturday at the
Hillel Foundation.
The group will first attend the Har-
yard-Michigan football game and
then return to the Foundation f6r the
party.
The meal will be prepared by Avu-
kah members and served at cost. Sup-
per will be followed by Palestinian
dancing and singing and social danc-
ing. .
Reservations may be made by call-
ing the Foundation, 3779, today. All
Avukah members and interested per-
sons are invited to attend.
MICHIGAN
NOW SHOWING -
THE HILARIOUS STAGE HIT
AT LAST HITS THE SCREEN!

Polish Infor ption Head W611
Speak before Press club Today
a - * +'
Joseph P. Junosza, director of the the International Commission on In-
Polithe InnernattonalcCommissionton In-
Polish Information Center for the tellectual Cooperation of the League
Middle West, will give a University ! of Nations. He also organized many
lecture before the 24th annual meet- international congresses in Poland
ing of the University Press Club at and showed an interest in all types
of international problems.
2 p.m. tomorrow in the Union Ball- In October, 1940, he escaped Ger-
room. man occupied Poland and fled to
Junosza, recently arrived in the London.
United States from ,Poland and Eng--
land, will bring to Ann Arbor a vivid
picture of the problems facing the m Odi elays'
United Nations in their war against,
Axis tyranny and aggression.
He is a veteran of the Polish-Bol- tlanta Vote
shevik .War of 1918-20 and again saw
service in the volunteer brigade of ATLANTA, Nov. 4.-(MP)-Instead of
Warsaw in September, 1939. After ballots and boxes, police yesterday
the brigade was dissolved, he re- found the door locked and two men
turned to'Warsaw and had the oP- inside fighting at a Peachtree Street
Order in act observe the Nazi 'New drugstore designated as a polling
Before the war, Junosza was well- place.
known as a Polish industrialist serv- Not only that, the officers said they
ing on the executive board of the found an improvised dice table set
Polish Association of Electrical Engi- up in the prescription department,
neers and acted as representative at with money and dice thereon.
I many annual conventions. .Called to investigate after three
Junosza was at one time President women poll workers reported the situ-
of the National Union of Polish stu- ation, police said they found the pro-
dents and for several years General prietoir drunk and fighting with a
Secretary of the Polish Committee of companion. Their rsr ct added:

Registration
.f Foreign
Stupdents U
20 Per Cent Increase
as 239 Are Enrolled
:from 69 Countries
War dangers and falling Univer-
sity enrollment did not cut the ranks

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of foreign students this near.

E
i
t
r
.
a

A twenty per cent increase in the
numbers of foreign students regis-
tered at the International Center, a4
total of 239, show students from otherj
lands pressing hard for their educa-
tion.
China sends the largest contingent
with its registration hitting 43. It has,
led all other nations in previous years
but has now hit an all-time peak.
Latin America sends more students
for the second consecutive year, but
El Salvador and the Dominican Re-
public are unrepresented for the first
time in several years.
Refugees are numerous with 45 stu-
dents from continental Europe. One
escaped to America from Crete and
ancther fled from the Chinese inter-
ior.
A. torpedoed ship could not impede
the journey of a Turkish student who
lost all his belongings in the sinking
ship. He is the only recent arrival'
from the Near East.
In all, 69 nations are represented by
students on the campus. China sends
43; Canada, 36; Hawaii. 22; Germany,
20; American citizens of Oriental des-
cent, 20O; Puerto Aica, 15; Philippine
Commonwealth, 14; Turkey, 12. and
Colombia, 11.

Next Blackout
Not Scheduled
Definitely Yet
Ann Arbor's next blackout will not
be of the "surprise" variety Police
Chief Sherman H. Mortenson. com-
mander of the Citizens Defense Corps.
disclosed yesterday with the an-
nouncement that permission is being
sought to hold the next test blackout
here Nov. 22.
There are too many University
students who have never been ac-
quainted with blackout rules, Chief
Mortenson explained, and a "sur-
prise" blackout would consequently
lead to much confusion and excite-
ment.
Students who attended the summer
semester at the University are vet-
erans of two blackouts, but manyeof
those who returned to the University
for the fall semester came from com-
munities which have.never had a testf
blackout.
Chief Mortenson said permission to
have the blackout on Nov. 22 is being
sought .from the sixth service army
command in Lansing. Ann Arbor will
not be included in the Detroit black-
out scheduled for Nov. 18, he added.
All defense factories in and around'
Ann Arbor will be asked to participate
in the next blackout for the first
time. Some of them have been having
individual test blackouts and emer-
gency drills.
There will be an important,
meeting at 7:30 p.m. today of Al-
pha Nu in the Alpha Nu room in
Angell Hall.

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 4.-(A )-The4
gallant and adventurous Errol Flynn
of the screen was pictured in court
tcday by a 17-year-old girl as a man
who knocked on her bedroom door
and entered at the same time.
Peggy La Rue Satterlee, who ac-
cuses the actor of twice attacking her
on, a Catalina Island fishing cruiseI
last year, told Judge Byron Walters
she was in bed aboard Flynn's yacht,
the Sirocco, when he suddenly ap-
peared in the stateroom assigned her,
clad in pajamas.
"He knocked and came in all at
the same time," she charged. She
said she chided him about coming
into her room but that he reassured
her, saying: "I just want to get in
bed with you and talk."
The alleged attack, she charges,

occurred Aug. 3, 1941. She told Judge
Walters that the following day Flynn
complained to her while he was div-
ing to spear fish that his nose hurt
"where you either kicked or hit me
last night."
"But he told the others it was sinus
trouble," she continued.
"That night . . . when we were
about a half hour from the main-
land, I remarked how pretty the
moon was," Miss Satterlee said, "and
Mr. Flynn said the moon looked much
prettier from a porthole. He asked
me to go downstairs and I did. We
entered his stateroom and he pushed
me ona bed. I fought against him.
I was mad this time ..."
Dr. Gray, who followed the girl
on the stand, said there was evidence
the girl might have been raped.

2nd Girl Testifies Against Flynn

1

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THERESNO

w

GETTING AROUND
GOOD THING

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Application Deadline for
Hillel Schoarships Set
Applications for the 1942-43 Hillel
Scholarship must be in no later than
tomorrow, ,Rabbi J. M. ;Cohen, di-
rector, announced.
The Pisgah Auxiliary of B'nai
B'rith annually awards $150 to some
Hillel member.
Applicatio.n blanks may be obtained
from the secretary at the Founda-
tion.

As the polls had to be opened and
as it was unsafe to leave the ladies in
the store with the men, we arrested
them."
VUL CANS TAP
Major William Renner and six un-
dergraduates were tapped last night
by Vulcan, senior engmineering honor-
ary society.
The six neophytes were Bruce Allen,
Bill Hutcherson, Bob Kemp, Edward
Rutan, Keith Smith and Carter Tay-
lor.

and "taste" for

yourself!

I

So come in

1_ 5'IA

TAVERN

' anleria
3 3'S Maynard

Reasonably Priced

.7.

WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE! DAY OR NIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Continuous Shows
From 1 P.M.

,,sRSNEMT5P ThA rA'

III

It-

' '!

HELP WANTED

WANTED: Student porter to work
in exchange for meals. Call 3722,
Alpha Rho Chi, 608 E. Madison.
F.R SALE
CHRISTMAS CARDS-The largest
selection in town. All imprinted
with your name. From 50 for $1.00
up. Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-'
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.

wtt 5 .
GEORGE iTOBIAS "ALLYN JOSLY:N
Mats. 25c CARTOON
Eyes. 40c -
ncl. tax NEWS
Syn., Springtime in the Rockies'

T e Deportment of Speech
presents
P LAY PRODUCTION
in
4'UNDOWN~

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY- 2.1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at loV price.
LOST and FOUND
SMALL, blue-ticked Beagle Hound.
Female. Phone after 6 p.m. 5549.
FOUND: Lady's square gold wrist
watch. Call Jacqueline Zeile-
2-4471.
SHELL-RIMMED GLASSES in light
tan case with initials V. G. Lost on
campus fast week: Call 3980.
STARBUCK'S was hazy last Friday.
Your raincoat's too small. Let's
trade. Contact Jack, evenings.
5420.
LOST-Brown Schaeffer pen Mon-
day in Library or on campus. Dana
Guimaraes. 'Call 2-4561. 581 Jor-
dan.
LOST, black suede purse, vicinity
Hill and Tappan, Saturday night.
Reward. Gerry Herman, phone
2-.5232.
KEY CASE-3 keys and driver's li-
cense. Between Mary Lee's and
Campus Drug on State. Nov. 2.
Call 2-4814 after 6:30; 5877 be-
tween 8 and 4. Reward.
CLASSIFIED
ADERTISING
RATES
Non-Contract
.40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in
composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
fice, 420 Maynard Street.

THURSDAY, NOV. 5
VOL. LIII No. 28
All notices for the Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
President in typewritten form by 3:30
p.m. of the day preceding its publica-
tion, except on Saturday when the no-
tices should be submitted by 11:30 a.m.
Notices
Group Pospitalization and Surgical
Service Enrollments: The final date
for acceptance of new enrollments
and reenrollments of all present sub-
scribers is today. After this date the
University group will be closed to en-
rcllments until May 5. Please give
this matter prompt attention.
To All Departments: The entry of
the United States in the war has of
necessity changed the habits of all
people. The University of Michigan
is not an exception to this change.
The procurement problems of the
University have increased in propor-
tion to the increase of goyernmental
restrictions, and in proportion to the
shortages of critical materials. The
University must adhere to the Pri-
ority Regulations, the Conservation
Orders, and the Limitation Orders
issued by the War Production Board.
The habits of the University must
change to conform to the times. We
cannot have all of the materials, or
the conveniences and services in the
future that we have been accustomed
to in the past. It is the intent of the
War Production Board to keep edu-
cational institutions operating with
their existing facilities and at their
existing level, and this only so far
as it does not impede the war effort.
This means that the University shall
not expand its facilities, make im-
provements or alterations, or reha-
bilitate any building, structure, or
project without specific approval of
the War Production Board, unless
there are no critical materials in-
volved.
We have been advised as follows:
'Most educational institutions
which have a satisfactory standing
and are expected to carry out war
training programs have adequate
equipment for such purposes, and
requests for expansion have to be
reviewed very critically."
This means that members of the
University of Michigan staff must,
in most cases, get along with what

they have. In this way they will
contribute most toward winning the
wvar.'
Walter L. Bulbick,
Purchasing Agent
Faculty of the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: The five-week
freshman reports will be due Sat-
urday, November 7, in the Academic
Counselors' Office, 108 Mason Hall.
Arthur Van Duren,
Chairman, Academic Counselor
Choral Union Memnbers: Members
of the Choral Union, whose attend-
ance records are clear, will please
call for courtesy tickets, admitting
to the Cleveland Symphony Orches-
tra concert, Friday, between the hours
of 10 and 12, and 1 and 4, at the of-
fices of the University Musical So-
ciety, in Burton Memorial Tower.
After 4 o'clock Friday no courtesy
tickets will b~e issued.
Charles A.sik, President,
University Musical Society
Naval Reserve Class V-5, V-7 and
Marine Corps Reserve: The recruit-
ing board for thesereserves will be
on the campus November 10. Stu-
dents interested in enlisting at that
time must have all their papers
ready for the board when it arrives.
Instructions may be had at the In-
formation Center, 1009 Angell Hall.
(Continued on Page 4)

\ 'V'

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'lo
~" $ON6$ BY MACm"K.GORpOQ4 f NRRY.WARREN "a

HRE'S FUN! MUSIC! GAIETY!
The Marines take over Iceland-
,; and Sonia takes over the Marines!

Q y

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N EPTL
DAUGF

Extra Added ---
UNE'S SOUTH NEWS OF
HTERS AMERICA THE DAY

i

Coming
Sunday!

E R ROL FLYNN
"DESPERATE JOURNEY"

An Excitin
Dramua 0
at the Bal
ihTONS[
through
t 8:3(

A NEW
LAY BY
JOHN LEWIS
BRUMM
mg Modern
'1 a Grl
ttle Front
Saturday
0 P.M.

Prices: 39c-55c-83c incl. Fed. Tax)

Lydia Mendeissolin Tbeaf rp

Phone 6300

r

i

Louis Fischer M. W. Fodor
AUTHORS - FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS
in a discussion
"The Shape of the Peace
To Come"
A realistic and dramatic close-up of the World at War,
and a Daring Forecast of the Peace - with Concrete
Proposals.

C

ME L *3 2A I 0% asow fl I U At 11 l~l2W r%§ffl A 1

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11111

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