100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, OCT. 23, 1942

TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TiHREE

. ... s. a .... .a y

Victory-Minded Wolverine

Team Arrives-

In Minneapolis

i?

(;ti -_

Statistics Show Maize And Blue
WillMiss Power Of Bob Wiese

E .1

By BOB SHOPOFF
Michigan will enter tomorrow's
tangle without one of its most potent
backs when Bob Wiese is forced to
watch the battle with Minnesota from
the sidelines. Just how much the Wol-
verines have depended on the husky
sophomore in the first four games
this season can plainly be seen by one
glance at the -statistics covering those
four tussles.
Big Bob has been romping wild
over the opponent's line this year with
his line bucks and spinner plays. At
this stage of the season Wiese leads
the rest of Coach Fritz Crisler's ele-
ven in the number of times he has
carried the ball on rushing plays and
also he has piled up the most yards
rushing.
The youngster from North Dakota
has handled the ball 57 times to gain
a total of 174 yards. It gives him an
average of three yards gained every
time he took a crack at the forward
wall.
Besides doing a major share of
Michigan ground offensive, Wiese has
had to add punting to his chores. The
Wolverines have punted 20 times dur-
ing the grid season, and Bob has han-
dled 15 of these. Cliff Wise and Don
Lund took over when Wiese was gut
of the lineup. Bob has built up an
average of 35.3 yards per punt with

his kicking improving as each game
passed.
Paul White, who raced through
Northwestern's team for two touch-
downs last week, has the best rushing
average on the squad. The "Whizzer"
has picked up an average of 4.7 yards
for 32 attempts. Crisler will probably
count a great deal on Paul to supply
some of the power which is lost by
the injury of Wiese.
Don Robinson and Bob Chappuis
lead in the aerial department. Robby,
lightweight halfback, has completed
eight out of 18 attempted passes for
a .445 percentage while Chappuis'
passes have gained the most yardage
-107. And believe it or not, Capt.
George Ceithaml tops everybody in
catching passes. Cy has grabbed eight
while Elmer Madar follows with
seven.

Varsity Given
Edge In Battle
WithGophers
Pre-Gagne Morale Highest
Of Season; Minnesota
Also Primed For Tilt
The victory hungry Wolverine grid-
ders-33 strong-pulled into Minne-
apolis today, the object of their trip
a battered old water jug.
That may seem a long way to go for
such a prize, and the efforts they'll
put forth in the Minnesota Stad-
ium tomorrow afternoon may seem
mighty strenuous for the same. But
let's explain why all the furor.
Back in 1903 when Fielding Yost
was newly installed in the coach's
seat here and Willie Heston was mak-
ing his name as the first of the Wol-
verine gridiron immortals, the foot-
ball team took a trip up to Minnesota
to play the Gophers, a second rate
team in those days. Hoping to keep
his boys in the best physical and men-
tal condition possible for the tilt, Yost
carried along a brown jug of good
Ann Arbor water. Michigan won the
game, but before the team got out of
Minneapolis some rabid and embit-
tered Gopher rooter had spirited the
Jug away.

iECHCOMBR

By BUD IENDEL
Daily SportsEditor
* * * *

NOTICE
Sophomores and second-s
ter freshmen are invited to ti
for basketball' managers'
Basketball managers are au
numerals and "M's". Those
ested should report to praci
Monday, Wednesday or Th
evening at 7:15.
Senior MA
Fred Gips

TC NRG

semes-
try out
jobs.
warded
inter-
tice on
ursday

Gophers, Look At This Power

SHE IS YOURS
>/ teau li/ut "Seven

op ite a ding
Seas Girl

in a 11"x17" color portrait as pictured in the Octob

issue of Esquire Magazine.

Just come in and ask f

your "SEVEN SEAS GIRL."
Limited supply - come in today.
mEflZTOGGER%
521 East Liberty Michigan Theatre Buildin

A

,}iureOu
What oufla'e
... THEN BUY THE BEST~

v Grp ,. .
anager Part Of Tradition
on Michigan didn't play Minnesota
again till 1910, but by that time the
______story of the jug had gotten around
until it became a sortgof tradition.
From that time on the Little Brown
Jug was considered the victory trophy
for all Gopher-Wolverine games.
For eight straight years the Wol-
verines have taken it on the chin from
the Gophers. But now, the emotional
pitch built up in the Michigan play-
ers is probably more intense than it
has been in recent years. Minnesota
has plenty to get excited about too.
er Twice defeated after a three year
record of no losses, and with the
or prospect of one of their last vestiges
of gridiron supremacy standing a
good chance of being snatched away,
George Hauser's husky lads will be in
their top form of the season when
they take the field tomorrow.
Gophers Boast Of Stars
Hauser has several men to be feared
on his squad, men like Capt. Dick
Wildung, All-American tackle last
ig year, quarterback Bill Garnaas, Herm
Frickey, the hard driving junior half-
back who scored the Gopher touch-
down that beat Michigan last year,
and Bill Daley, the fullback who had
a fine time battering the Wolverines
last year for the better part of the
game. Hauser has plenty of reserve
material on hand too, probably hold-
ing the edge over Michigan in that
department.
Crislernsent his charges through
light limbering up drills before train
time yesterday afternoon, and for
the most part the Ann Arbor Gopher-
hunters looked in excellent shape and
good spirits for the trip. Bob Wiese,
the injured fullback, will make the
trip with the rest of the squad but
it is unlikely that his sprained ankle
will permit him to see any action.
Don Lund, sophomore reserve full-
back from Detroit, seems to have
first call as the starting line-plunger.
With Michigan roaring for a sound
thumping of their ancient rivals, and
with Minnesota battling desperately
to pull their fast degenerating season
out of the mire, the game should be a
natural. As one Wolverine player put
it, "I hope we can get a touchdown
for each of those eight sad years."
Service Tilt Moved
WASHINGTON, Oct. 22.-()-The
Army-Navy football game, one of the
annual classics of American sport,
was shifted by President Roosevelt
today from Philadelphia to Annapo-
lis,'Md.
The game, which usually draws up-
ward of 100,000 spectators to Phila-
delphia's Municipal Stadium late in
November, was moved to the grounds
of the United States Naval Academy
because of war conditions-and only
residents of Annapolis will be per-
mitted to attend.
White House officials said this was
done to save gasoline and tires and
other transportation facilities.
Bucks Ready For 'Cats
COLUMBUS, 0., Oct. 22.- (A)-
Coach Paul Brown put his undefeated,
untied Ohio State gridmen through a
"polishing up" workout against
Northwestern formations today and
said 36 players would entrain for the
game at Evanston, Ill., Saturday.

IF YOU BELIEVE in superstition,
then you better place a bet on
Minnesota in tomorrow's Wolverine-
Gopher clash.
For Michigan won't have the bene-
fit of a Friday good-luck lunch which
has become a part and parcel of every
Wolverine game this season.
Every Friday, at the stroke of
noon, four large, athletic-looking
men enter a downtown restaurant.
They march to a table off by itself
in a corner, pull out four chairs and
sit down for an hour of strategy
talk and four often-neglected meals.
They're the members of Michigan's
coaching staff, Fritz Crisler, Big-
gie Munn, Earl Martineau and Ben-
nie Oosterbaan, and until today
they were as regular as Ann Arbor,
sunshine, once a week, in this pop-
ular downtown eatery.
They always take the same table,
and they always sit at the same chairs
at that table. But today, the table
and chairs will be vacant. The Wol-
verine coaches will be in Minneapolis
when the noon whistle blows, and
superstition will have to be forgotten.
IT'S A FUNNY THING, and it seems
strange after seeing it the other
way for so many years, but Michigan
is a definite favorite for the victory
wreath tomorrow. It's the first time
in too many years that the Wolver-
ines will have entered the annual
classic as the pre-game choice, but
don't let that favorite business fool
you.
Three times in the last four years
Michigan has been the underdog,
and three times it has outplayed,
outgamed and outfought the Golden
Gophers, but it couldn't outscore
them. Tomorrow, the Wolverines
will be the betting entry, and they
too many be outplayed, outgamed
and outfought. But that is ques-
tionable, and the main considera-
tion comes in the scoring depart-
ment anyway. Games are still won
by the larger point total, as Minne-
sota has so convincingly proved
these past eight years, and Michi-
gan is favored on that account only.
BUT IF ANY TEAM in the nation is
equipped to upset the dope, Min-
nesota is the team. Even the writers
in their own city have sold the Go-
phers short and have established the
Wolverines as the favorite. If the
Norsemen read the papers and believe
everything they see there, then Mich-
igan will win without any trouble.
But the Norsemen are very doubting
lads, and they don't believe half of
what they read in the papers, which
means that Michigan will have its
hands full of the roaring Golden Ava-
lanche.
In their locker room, the Gophers
have plastered huge signs bearing the
terrifying inscription, "Kill the
Wolves". In their practice sessions,
they have worked almost solely on
their untested passing attack, and
only because Michigan has showed
itself a weak team in the department
of aerial defense. The Gophers, to
tell the truth, think themselves a'

better football aggregation than the
Wolverines, and they don't relish the
underdog role that has been assigned
them.
If you'll remember, Minnesota
came within a scant yard of whip-
ping the Iowa Seahawks, the only
team to boast of a victory over
Michigan. Minnesota had the ball
on the Seahawk one yard line, first
and goal to go, when Bill Daley,
who had carried it there for the
Gophers, fumbled. That was the old
ball game, 7-6, and a heartbroken
Minnesota team didn't recover in
time to stave off a rushing gang of
Illinois gridders the next week. But
it's ready now, which can only mean
trouble for Michigan.
On the season record, in games won
and lost, Michigan should be favored.
But when the little things are taken
into consideration, it would be far
safer to call it a toss-up. The Gophers
are just as determined to keep that
Little Brown Jug as the Wolverines
are to win it back, and it boils down
to a ferocious contest between two
evenly-matched squads.
MICHIGAN will depend on its stur-
dy line, the "Seven Oak Posts",
to hurl back the vaunted Gopher run-
ning attack. It will count on its bril-
liant backfield to riddle the Minne-
sota defense with deception and
speed. The Gophers will stake their
all on wave after wave of power, and
possibly a new aerial offensive.
They'll toss their own great line, dot-
ted with great and near-great players,
against the rock-ribbed Wolverine
forward wall. And they'll match
Michigan in courage, for there has
never been a Minnesota team which
is lacking in that vital requisite.
So there it is. The Wolverine is
favored to feast on Gopher meat,
and the Gopher refuses to believe
it. Which leaves the issue squarely
up to the Wolverine. Tomorrow he
gets his chance to convince the
Gopher, and there's only on con-
vincer he can use-better football.
Clemson Wins, 18-6
COLUMBIA, S.C., Oct. 22.-(P)-
Clemson College's Tigers defeated
South Carolina's Gamecocks 18-6 to-
day by breaking a first half deadlock
with third and fourth period touch-
downs.
An alert Clemson team nullified a
second period South Carolina lead set
up by Ken Roskie's scoring smash
from the two, when Red Stacey a
few minutes later stepped over from
the seven with Marion Butler's pass.
The Tigers stepped up their passing
attack in the third and took a 12-6
lead, and Butler clinched the victory
with a 54-yard touchdown jaunt as
the final period opened.
SCULPTURED HAIR
Styles are new - different -
suave - shaped - blended -
The Natural Way. Try one!
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich Theatre

Kuzma ..... 8
Wiese ......57
Robinson .. .30
White ......32
Chappuis .. .28
Wise ........0
Ceithaml ... 4
Wardley ... .10
Yaap ...... 4
Madar ..... 0
Sharpe ..... 0
Lund .......13
Boor ........2
Stenberg ... 1

0 0 0 0 0 7 100 0
0 0 0 0 0 4 64 0

i

59 4.5 0

0
0
43
0

0
0
21.5
0

0 0 1 15 2
0 0 0 0 0

1
1

.5
1.0

0
0

0 0 0 0 0 00

*TC-times carried; NRG-net rushing gain; P-passes; PC-passes
completed; N2G-net passing gain; C-passes caught.

26
174

130 4.6 31
0 0 11

124 4.1
150 4.7

3

Ave.
3.3
3.0

2 32 3 66 0 0
10 107 0 0 0 0
5 82 0 0 3 121

0
0
40.3
0
0

-1 -.2 0 0 0 8 78 0
36 3.6 2 1 22 1 2 0

MICHIGAN'S /laxrt.'ma : BEER " RIGHT FROM THE CYPRESS CASKS OF GOEBEL
Goebel Brewing Company, Detroit, Michigan
II

0
0

P PC NPG C Gain Punt
4 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 2 17 15
18 8 98 1 2 0

s Yds. Ave.
0 0
529 35.3
0 0

C
t

13 3.3 0

0 0 0 0 0 0o" 0

IrYr
SUIT
TOPCOATf
OVERCOAT{
50
Others e
24.50 and 34.50

C

i

I

Just arrived-

I

A Limited Shipment of
LOG LOG TRIG
DUPLEX SLIDE RULES
WAHR'S BOOKSTORE

I

0

I

I

316 South State

j.

heSTEIN BLOCH QAo

Lead the

parade

FRE

S

Making every payday Bond-day rather curtails
our buying power . . and rightfully so! But
by buying the best in cut, fabric and workman-
ship we are saving by needing less, less often.

H
S

of well-dressed men
at Michigan.
SOLD EXCLUSIVELY IN
ANN ARBOR at

NUT

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan