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October 23, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGt T"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

State Approves
War Athletics
In High Schools

Commando-Type
Program May
Championship

Training
Lead To
Matches

LANSING, Oct. 22.- WP)- The
Michigan High School Athletic Asso-
ciation has approved a plan. for con-
mando-type training in high schools
which eventually may lead to state
championship competition.
In its October bulletin, the associa-
tion endorsed a program drafted by
the Minnesota branch of the Office,
of Civilian Defense which prescribes
a training course adaptable to any
playing field and permits an unlim-
ited number of students to partici-
pate.
Plotted on a regulation football
field, the course borders the playing
area with 11 different obstacles
spaced 20 yards apart, permitting a
continuous chase of more than 300
yards, down the sidelines and across
the end zones.
The course presents obstacles in
vaulting, running, jumping, climbing
and crawling. The bulletin said relay
races could be staged over the course
and telegraphic meets with other
schools arranged to give the program
competitive flavor.
If the course is carefully laid out,
it was suggested, "there is no reason
why records for dual, district and
even state championship meets should
not be kept."
Enough skill is required in clearing
the obstacles, the bulletin asserted,
so that "proper instruction is desir-
able."

Credit System
Will Benefit
University Men
Students leaving the. University for
the armed forces can receive credit-
for work done' during their last se-
mester under a special pro-rated.
credit system established last Decem-
ber.
Since its establishment by a Re-
gential resolution, 92 students in the
various schools and' colleges have
taken advantage of the plan.
Examinations for the withdrawing
students are given to determine the
grade. Hours of credit are granted on
the basis of proximity to the end of
the semester.
Eact credits, hours, and grades are
left largely to the discretion of the
instructor and the department. Full
credit may be granted in many cases.
The pro-rated credit system allows
graduating seniors to receive their
degrees if with pro-rated credits they
have enough hours to qualify for the
degree.
The system also applies to students
withdrawing to become civilian clerks
with the armed forces.

Co-Op Houses
To Elect New
Council Head.
The three-hundred students in
eleven campus cooperative houses
will name either Orval Johnson, '43.
or Herman Epstein, Grad., president
of the Intercooperate Council in their
annual election Tuesday.
The voting, on a preferential basis,
will determine which of the two men
will preside over the 22 man Council
elected last week. The other auto-
matically will become vice-president.
Sally Johnston, '44, of Palmer
House and Hazel Ayers, Grad., of
Muriel Lester House are candidates
for secretary in the same election.
The Council officers will hold their
positions all this year as governors
of the eleven campus co-ops.
Slosson Will Address
Hillel Audience Today
Prof. Preston Siosson, of the his-
tory department, will speak at 8:30
p. m. today at the Hillel Foundation
on the subject "Does Britain Fight
For Empire?"
The lecture is the second of a series
of Friday evening discussions to be
sponsored by Hillel throughout the
school year.

Determined to do as much as they
can in the war effort, Ann Arbor
school children, 3500 strong, have.
been literally getting in the scrap
during the last two weeks.
All over America school children,
wcrking in conjunction with the
WPB, have collected scrap in a drive
which started October 7 and will run
until Saturday.
C. C. Crawford, assistant superin-
tendent of the Ann Arbor High
School, in charge of- the drive here,
said yesterday that the drive in Ann
Arbor would produce over 170 tons
of scrap and might possibly reach
the 200 ton mark.
The money earned by the schools
from the scrap is placed by each into.
a war chest. Funds from this chest
will be used to make donations to
the Red Cross, USO, China and Rus-

War Casuaclty And Jap Prisoner

School Children To Use Money
From Scrap For War Charity

sian Relief. Bundles for Britain and
the Refugee Children fund.
Ann Arbor High School is expected
to be the largest collector with almost
55 tons already turned in. Slosson
school reports about 20 tons has been
turned in by its especially organized
junior army.
The Veterans of Foreign Wars akre
collecting the scrap from the schools
and taking it to the junk dealers. Uni-
versity trucks have also been used by
University High and Elementary
schools.
ENLARGER STOLEN
A valuabie Leitz enlarger disap-
peared from the Natural Science Buil-
ding early this week. Building em-
ployes believe the thief gained en-
trance with a front door key. Ann
Arbor police are investigating.

;;yroii ~Jarntwn (left), Nw York Times correspondent, was reported
killed in New Guinea on Oct. 18. Born in Adrian, he was a former cable
editor for the Associated Press. The New York Times sent him across
seas after his sensational work on the American Legion. Sgt. Mechanic
Harold A. Spatz (right) was named by the Tokyo radio as one of four
airmen who had fallen into Japanese hands after Doolittle's raid on
Tokyo recently.
Avi t rs geldBylaps

CLASFIDADVERTISING
El____________________D_____

that means good ood.
Good Food means.
33E
T e T v E NMA1YNARD
4~ aeesnmismeinismmisnmmliuiisnmsos

Avukah Members,
Ta Hold Meeting
Members of Avukah, student Zion-
ist organization, will attend a lun-
cheon and organization meeting at
12:30 p. m. tomorrow at the Hillel
Foundation.
The business of the meeting will
be concerned with choosing commit-
tees, planning the program for the
coming year and approving or revis-
ing a written statement of aims and
policy.
All new and former members are
urged to attend. Reservations may be
made by calling the Foundation,
3779, today.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease. of" 10qfor each
additional S words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or mre days. (Increase
of $.25; for each additional
5 words.)
Contract Rates on U e.ust.
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in
composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
fice, 420 Maynard Street.

MISCELLANEOUS

FOR RENT
ROOM and BATH in fine home for
gentleman who has car. Call 2-2102.

MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel:Co., phone 7112.
ROOM and BOARD
ROOM & BOARD for 2 men students
who can work part time. Phone
7070.-

By The associated Press
WASHINGTON, Oct. 22.-Official{
acknowledgment that four United1
States aviators who participated in
the bombing of Tokyo April 18 may
be in Japanese hands came from the
War Department today amid indica-
tions that the Axis might be heading
toward formal repudiation of the
accepted laws of humanity in war-
f are.
Secretary of War Stimson told his
press conference the names of the
four airmen used in recent Japanese
propaganda broadcasts "fairly well
correspond" with those of American
fliers long listed by the Army as miss-
ing. One of the planes in the Japan
raid, he said, was interned in Russia
and several others were involved in
forced landings in China.
CONTINUOUS DAILY
FROM 1 P.M.
" " ufArf
-- Today and Saturday -

Japan has asserted the airmen
would be punished for alleged inhu-
mianities during bombing of Japan,
┬░ut Stimson said he had no reports,
other than those of the Japanese
radio, that the men had been sub-
jected to trial.

FOR SALE

The GARGOYLE KID

Score'sAnother
ToUChdown

..

_

PERSONAL STATIONERY. - 100
sheets and envelopes, $1.00. Printed
with your name and- address-
The Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
LOST and FOUND
LOST: Gray knee-length reversible
combination: raincoat & light top-
coat. Fred Schuster, 2-2955.
LOST - Wallet, black. Containing
cash and checks. Substantial re-
ward. Finder return to Margaret
Warren, Mosher Hall.
HELP WANTED
MAN for furnace and other odd jobs
in exchange for room. 510 E. Cath-
erine.
DISHWASHERS WANTED. Meals
and compensation. Sorority. 407
N. Ingalls. 2319.
FOUNTAIN HELP between 11 & 1
or evenings; good pay; ask for Ted.
Marshall's Drug Co., 235 S. State.
WANTED-Girl student to work in
faculty home for room and board.
Salary for extra time. Phone
2-4074.
TWO MALE STUDENTS with gro-
cery experience if possible to work
in University Hospital storeroom-
Friday P.M. and Saturday morn-
ing. 51c per hour. Apply personnel
office.
PHOTOGRAPHIC darkroom worker,
to handle processing of Michigan-i
ensian, Michigan Daily and Gar-
goyle photographs. Apply: Mrs.
Mosher or Stuart Gildart, Student
Publications Building.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.

I

Read the Garg,
with its exclusive football feotures
for October.
ComingSoon!I

Extra
MARCH OF TIME
"The Fighting French"

NEWS - CARTOON
- Coming Sunday -
'Here We Go Ag gin'

ANNOUNCI NG
A NEW RECORDING
OF THE GREAT

U

Schubert Trio Op. 99

played by

A N
fix;C

NiCELY NICELY -
Deals Double and' picks
the same pocket twic e'I

teifetz ... Feuermnann
... Rubinstein ..-.

Victor

album

DM 923

HENRY starring LUCILLE
FONDA * B ALL

$4.72,

BY STICKING WAR STAMPS
IkI AiiD FIPCeF RAAC

r
t. .Y
-.. .
. , +

HORSETHIEF-Even
in tise machine age it
does all right!

I . .^--

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