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January 17, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY ' aGETIMI'

iota Trounces

Sextet; Swimmers

Swamp

Panthers

.

Gophier Power
Trims Varsity
With Ease, 4-0
Sophomore Arnold Paces
Attack For Minnesota;
Stodden Stars In Defeat
(Continued from Page 1)
nesota leader turned in to the home
team's third goal.'
In the third period, it took the Go-
phers but nine seconds to tally their
fourth goal, this one also coming on
apass from Arnold to Paulsen.
Hank Loud played a great game
in the nets for the Wolverines, stop-
ping 43 shots during the course ofs
the contest but Michigan's almost
non-existent offense gave the little
goalie nothing to work with. The
game was extremely hard-fought
throughout but exceptionally clean,
only four penalties being called by
referee Jake Peletier. Paul Goldsmith
and Max Bahrych both turned in
some sparkling play for the visitors.
THE LINEUPS

I

Faerdf tf#r e(tolt---

- 1

Jini Ci eii May Get ,Nod
To Start Against Badgers
Powerful Wisconsin Cagers Diminish Hope
For Initial Big Ten Conference Win

Michdl ;enni Aqtip e Sthiarsweep
All Race Events, Lose Diving

MAX BAHRYCH

By NORM MILLER
Jim Grissen, husky junior guard,
may get his big chance in a starting
role tomorrow night when Michigan's
victory-starved hoopmen return to
the home bailiwick to take on Wis-
consin's fast stepping Badgers.
Desperate in his attempt to un-
_cver a capable replacement for con-
valescent Bob Fitzgerald, Coach Ben-
nie Oosterbaan yesterday shifted
Grissen to the right forward position
in a lengthy practice session.
The experiment worked out suf-
ficiently well to warrant a test under
fire, with the result that the stocky
Holland cager will probablyget the
starting call against the Badgers.
Oosterbaan had high hopes that
the shift would prove just the com-
bination needed to break the Wolver-
ines' losing streak tomorrow night,
a feat whichsshouldprove no easy
task for the Varsity, judging from the
rapid clip at which Wisconsin had
been travelling all season.
Hard Task Ahead
Word from Wisconsin has it that
this year's edition of the CardinalsI
is the best that has, come out of
Madison since Coach George "Bud"
Foster's quintet tied for the Big Ten
crown back in 1935. And the team's
record to date bears out this fact.
The Badgers have won eight games
and lost two so far this season, and
are tied for third place in the Confer-
ence standings by virtue of their two
victories in three Big Ten games.
The Cardinal quintet recently
recently handed, Iowa its- first set-
back of the season and holds viptories
over Notre Dame, Princeton, and
Purdue, three teams that have de-
feated Michigan this season. Wiscon-
sin's only losses have come at the
hands of Pittsburgh, 36-34, and Min-
nesota, when the Gophers caught

again proving a nightmare for his
Big Ten opponents.f
Englund's supporting cast will find
veterans Ted Strain and Johnny
Kotz, sensational sophomore star,
at the forward position. It was Kotz
who was the big noise in the Wis-
consin lineup as the Badgers snatched
a wild overtime victory from Purdue
by a 48-42 score Monday.
In reserve the Cardinals possessl
the Big Ten's tallest cager, titanic
Don Timmerman. A six-foot, ten-inch
center, Timmerman was bothered by
injuries his first two seasons, but now
has recovered and serves as a capable
replacement for Englund.
The game should be anything but a
cinch for Michigan's cellar-occupants.
Track Hopes
Of Yearlings
LookBright
By HOE SELTZER
Readers of The Daily sports pages
may have noticed the sickening reg-
ularity with which Wolverine coaches
have been smiling over their pros-
pects of late. And now, just to put a
clincher on things it is hereby an-
nounced that Chester Stackhouse,
mentor of the freshmen trackmen. is
also a member of the Happy Smilers
League.
For among his 75 frosh cindermen
Stack has a number of very promis-
ing lads. In the distance events espec-
ially is there better than average ma-
terial. Warren Hart so far is setting
the pace for a quintet of crack half-
i milers. Ernest Leonardi and John Ing-
I ersoll in the mile, and Herb Collins

(Continued irom Page 1)
as the trio of Charley Barker, Skin-
ner and Tom Williams almost lapped
the Panther aggregation in ;3:04.6.
That also beat the Eastern Collegiate
record.
The crowd was waiting for Gus
Sharemet to smash the 100-yard
mark with ease but he let them down.
The All-American had trouble with
the turns and the ropes tonight ash
he chalked up a winning time of 57.5,
pretty slow for a man who had done
51.8.
Coach Mann entered Jack Patten
in both the distance events and he
came through with ease, taking the
220 with a four length lead over
team mate Will Garvey. In the 440
he actually lapped the Pitt entry,
George Wilde. The 50 yard race pro-
vided an upset when Bob West, a
sophomore, just nipped Charley Bar-
ker who had a full evening of work.
West's time of 25.1 tied the pool
record. Samson of Pitt was third.
The final relay at+00 yards free
style was another walkaway. Barker,
Sofiak .boosts
Scoring rTotal
To 92 Points
Jim Mandler tossed 27 points in
the Varsity's games with Purdue and
Illinois to creep within five points
of Mike Sofiak for the scoring lead-
ership of the Wolverine basketball
team.
Sofiak's 19 points in the two tilts,
however, boosted his total for the
season to 92 and enabled him to re-
tain his lead over his team mates.
The diminutive Michigan forward
also committed three personal fouls
in each.game and made good on three
out of four shots to hold his lead
in those two departments.
The complete records follow:
VARSITY SCORING RECORDS

West, Williams and Sharemet swam
the race with Williams getting the
fastest 100, being clocked in .56 even.
The team moves on to New York
early tomorrow morning where it
will meet the New York A.C. Satur-
day night.
SUMMARIES
300-yard medley relay: won by
Michigan (Barker. Skinner, Williams)
time 3:04.7.
220-yard free style: won by Patten,
Michigan; Garvey, Michigan, second;
Wilde, Pitt, third. Time 2:28,6.
50-yard free style: won by West,
Michigan; Barker, Michigan, second;
Samson, Pitt, third. Time 25.1.
Fancy diving: won by Ames, Pitt;
Kaule, Pitt, second; Hayes, Michi-
gan, third.
100-yard free style: won by Share-
met, Michigan; Allen, Michigan, sec-
ond; Samson, Pitt, third. Time :57.5.
150-yard backstroke: won by Hor-
lenka, Michigan; Fedor, Pitt, second;
Soles, Pitt, third. Time 1:41.2.
200-yard breast stroke: won by
Skinner, Michigan; Cosgrove, Pitt,
second; Vitartis, Pitt, third. Time,
2:32.9
440-yard free style: won by Patten,
Michigan; Wilde, Pitt, second; Arge-
lander, Pitt, third. Time 5:07.8.
400-yard relay: win by Michigan
(Barker, West, Sharemet, Williams).
Time 3:46.8.

Michigan
Loud
Stodden
Ross
Goldsmhith
Kemp
Gillis

Pos.
G
LD
RD
C
LW
LW

Mxinnesota
Joseph
Cramp
Anderson
Galt
Magnus
Eggleton

TED STRAIN

Michigan spares: Bahrych, Lovett,
Heddle, Collins, Samuelson, Corson.
Minnesota spares: Paulsen, Junger,
Arnold, Smith. Bolla, Robertson.
Scoring:
first Period
1. Minnesota-Arnold, 12:06.
Penalties: none.
Second Period
2. Minnesota, Arnold, 0:06,
3. Minnesota-Paulsen (Arnold),
2:20.
Penalties: Stodden (tripping).
Third Period
4. Minnesota-Paulsen (Arnold),
0:09.
Penalties: Bolla (high stick), Stod-
den (high stick'), Junger (high
stick)..
Goalie's Stops: By Loud, 16-13-14,
-43.
By Joseph, 1-8-2-11.
Lombardi Does Not Sign
OAKLAND, Calif., Jan. 16-(P)-
Ernie Lombardi, first string catcher
of the world champion Cincinnati
Reds, said today he was not satisfied
with the 1941 contract offered him.
He has returned the contract un-
signed.
Lombardi had a $6,000 pay cut last
season and wanted part of that sum
added to his 1941 salary.

PAUL GOLDSMITH

Matmen Open Bi
Agaitust Weal

r,

S4,LE

_-.
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,;

,ill

MANHATTAN
SHIRTS
AT
ROGER'S
MEN'S WEAR
1107 So. University

By STAN CLAMAGE
Northwestern's Wildcat wrestling
team, tamed by inexperience, will op-
pose the Wolverine squad in the Yost
Field House tomorrow afternoon in
the first conference meet for both
teams.
Despite any apparent weakness of
the visitors, the Michigan grapplers
will try to show more of that zip
of which they are capable than was
seen in the year's first tussle against
the Dearborn A.C. last Saturday
night.-
First of all ,two Wolverines are
out to avenge defeats which they suf-
fered at the hands of two of the
Northwestern men last year. Fred
Klemach, 121,-pounder, was tossed
by Hollister last 'year, but will have
to seek his avenge against another
opponent, probably against JohnnyI
Pfau. Gridder Jack Butler, who has
returned to the mat again this year,
will have to try to avenge his defeat
of last year also against a Northwest-
ern newcomer, Lyman Grover.
Returning from the Northwestern
team of 1940, which was trounced

the Badgers on an off night last in the two-mile round out this well-
week. balanced distance strength.
Main attraction on the Wisconsin Sprinters Promising
card is big six-foot, four-inch Gene In the sprints Bob Urbanek and
Englund, last year's All-Conference Leonard Alkon turned in identical x.
center. Englund, who has tallied 33 times in the outdoor 100 yard dash.
points in three Big Ten games, is Since then a leg injury has caused
the former to ease up for awhile, but
he and Alkon are expected to give ~
g Ten season the frosh sprint records a going over
before the season is out.j
Chuck Pinney in the low hurdles I
and Jim Sears 'n the 440 have al-
ready shown themselves to be very
by Michigan 24-8, are only two let- handy in their specialties. DON T
termen--scrappy Captain Dick Tru- In the field events there is first of
bey, at 175-pounds, and Ed McMillen, all one Pete Wege of Grand Rapids Hn
at 155-pounds. Both grapplers proved who is a "proven javelin thrower."
themselves to be strong representa- In high school Pete tossed the spear In Poro
tives in their first season last year a cool 240 feet, which is a very lusty
as sophomores. heave and one which gladdens the Michigan's tw
After the completion of practice heart of any track coach.
yesterday, the Michigan team ap- Gtidoen Pthot tomparmn,
peared to be in fine condition. Ray Pete also doubles in the shot put to play in a
Deane's knee injury has ceased to event where he and Charles Haslam game Feb. 22 i
cause him any- trouble. And Jack have both done better than 40 feet. vealed yesterday
Butler looked as if his condition was Haslam is a freshman football man, Details of the
rapidly improving as he succeeded in as are also the other shot-putters to be between
nosing out Emil Lockwood in their Julius Franks, Arnold Kargenian and and a profession
heavyweight battle. - Paul Johnson. closed.
In addition to Klemach and But- Other potential comers in the field
ler, two of the present Michigan men events are Roosevelt Stiger, who has yearling track c
wrestled against Northwestern last already broad-jumped better than men develop mo
year. Jim Galles will again grapple 22 feet, and Walter Lindstrom in the and there are a
Captain Trubey whom he threw in discus. sung plebes for
the 175-pound division. In the 145- This is the present cream of the house has the h
pound class, John Paup will probably
face Henry Puharich again.~
Penna, Hines Deadlock__
SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Jan. 16.
-M)-Overlooked in the crush of ___
first round sub-par firing, Tony _____ ____ ~ ___ -~~"" ~____
Penna of Dayton, Ohio, and Jimmy ~ -'
Hines of Great Neck, L.I., charged~ -
down the home stretch today to end

Vay Appear
posed Grid Tilt
wo-time All-Amercan,
has been contacted
tentative post-season
n Florida, it was re-
.e proposed tilt, said
a group of All-Stars
nal team, were not dis-
crop. But some track-
ore slowly than others,
at least 30 as yet un-
whom Coach Stack-
highest of high hopes.

FA
Sofiak6...........36
Grissen ...........11
Herrmann ..... 10
Ruehle.............9
Brogan..........22
Mandler...........25
Cartmill ........11
Fitzgerald ........10
Westerm2........2

FM
26
7
6
5
11
11
4
2
0

GP
Sofiak . ... 9
Mandler ... 9
Brogan . ... 9
Ruehle .... 9
Fitzgerald 4
Cartmill .... 9
Hcrrmann .. 8
Doyle.......5
Grissen ..... 5
Glasser .... 6
Totals .... 9

FG
33
38
38
14
9
5
4
6
1
2
130

F
26
11
11
5
2
4
6
0
7
0
72

T
92
87
87
33
20
14
14
12
9
4
332

PF
23
13
13
18
7
9
9
3
5
1
105

IMMERMAN

FOUL SHOOTING (Averages)

AVE.
.722
.637
.600
.556
.500
.444
.346
.200
.000

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