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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THV MIC141G AN 1 A tLY

FRIDAY. J 1ARY 17, 11441

Toledo U Host
To Engineer's
DebateSquad
Five Sigma Rho Tau Men
Will Discuss Question
Of Nicaraguan Canal,
Five members of Sigma Rho Tau,
honorary engineering speech society,
will debate a Toledo University squad
in- Toledo today on the topic: "Re-
solved: That a Canal Should Be Built
Across Nicaragua."
Representatives of the University
team will include Norman Taylor,
'42E, president of the local Sigma
Rho Tau chapter, Dean Woodbury,
'42E, Edward Rutan, '43E, Alexander
Pentland, '41E, and John Hammelef,
'42E.
Among the arguments which will
be considered will be the cost of build-
ing such a canal, its feasibility from
an .engineering point of view, its ad-
vafitages and disadvantages from the
point of view of national defense
and the question of the difficulty
of receiving permission for such a
project.
The next meeting of the "Stump
Speakers Society" will be held at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Union when
the younger members of the society
will hold another intercircle debate
on the topic: "Resolved: That the
United States Government Manufac-
ture Munitions." Another roundtable
discussion on the, relative value of
two-cycle and four-cycle diesel mot-
ors may also be held.
Holland Speaks
Speaking on "Television," Prof.
Lewis N. Holland of the electrical en-
gineering department addressed the'
Port Huron Rotary Club yesterdayl
noon in Port Huron.
THE JOHN MARSHALL

a asL M CifA A I VllV AT TT1~ ~l~l a a a Vtr j. a l.. U r i a a 1 -AJA ..a wJ.Vn,.aa a$ ...rx

k

Chips Of f Union Block Chip Table-Top

-Daily Photo by Will Sapp
Michigan Union President Doug Gould, '41, shows Union crony
Charles Heinen, '41E, just what can be done to a Taproom table-top
with a pair of carving-tools. Heinen, tools in hand, is about to engrave
his own initials next to 'Gould's. The Union invites all senior students
to do the same. No repercussions will follow; just stop over at the Union
Taproom any afternoon, leave your identification card at the basement
check-room, and then do your darndest. The handicraft of former
generation; of Michigan men now decorate the Taproom's walls, and
the Union wants to see what the present generation can do.
Institute For Fishes Research
Has Aided University Colection

news
dorms
By GLORIA NISHON
and DAVID LACHENBRUCH
Although the imminence of finals
has put a crimp into social activi-
ties in the dorms, things have
picked up a little in this second
week since the holidays.
Martha Cook will hold an inform-
al supper dance from 9:30 p.m. to
12:30 a.m. today, Elizabeth Luck-
ham, '42, chairman, announced yes-
terday. Decorations will follow the
patriotic motif and Max Crossman's
band will provide the melodies.
Stockwell Hall is having its winter
formal from 9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. today.
Gordon Hardy's orchestra will play
and a committee of ten girls com-
posed of Connie Gilbertson. '43, Car-
ole Kleiner, '43, Jean Long, '42D,
Jane Emery, '42, Leah Popper, '42,
Frances Cutting, '42, Mary-Jean O'-
Donnell, '41Ed, Helen Johnson, '43,
=nd Caroline Sigrist, '43, will assist
Chairman Rosalie Elbinger, '43.
Jane Rosing, '42, chairman, an-
nounced yesterday that Mosher
Hall will hold its winter formal
from 9 p., to 12 tomorrow. Bill
Gail and his orchestra will furn-
ish the music.
The semester's last issue of "The
East Wind" came out yesterday. It
has been an ambitious enterprise on
the part of the fellows in the East
Quad. The cartoons by Paul Hazel-
ton, '44A, and Bob "Zipper" Mc-
Neil, '44A, have been especially wor-
thy of mention.
The East Quad's new constitu-
tion is now outlined and ready for
ratification by the individual
houses. This constitution will grant
greater governing power to the
house officers. The Quadrangle
Council, headed by Paul Roesch,
141L, prepared the document.
A new photography dark room is
being partitioned from the west
chackroom in the East Quadrangle
... Among other improvements made
during vacation: venetian blinds in
Tyler and Greene House first floor
windows . . . 4dditional bulletin
boards in West Quad . . . remodeled
postoffice so that packages may be
handled more efficiently . . . new
combination meeting place for West
Quad Council and office for "East
Wind."
Hillel Discussion
Group Will Hear
Slosson Lecture,

DAILY OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

I

FRIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1941
VOL. LI. No. 80
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices
To Faculty, Students, and All Con-
cerned: Any one observing reckless-
ness by bicyclists using Campus walks
or drives is requested to take down
and report to the Business Office
of the University the license number
of the bicycle concerned.
Shirley W. Smith
Any person who saw the accident
at noon, Thursday, January 9, on the
diagonal in front of the General Li-
brary Building, which accident re-
sulted in the injury of Miss Vivian
Hopkins, and who can furnish infor-
mation leading to the identifying of
the bicyclist, is requested to give such
information to Mr. H. G. Watkins
at the University Business Office.
Student Accounts: Your attention
is called to the following rules passed
by the Regents at their meeting of
Feb. 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than
the last day of classes of each sem-
ester or Summer Session. Student
loans which are not paid or renewed
are subject to this regulation; how-
ever, student loans not yet due are
exempt. Any unpaid accounts at
the close of business on the last day
of classes will be reported to the
Cashier of the University, and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the sem-
ester or Summer Session just com-I
pleted will not be released, and no
transcript of credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will notdbe allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or Sum-
mer Session until payment has been
made.''
S. W. Smith,
Vice-President and Secretary
Student Loans: All those wishing
to apply for a student loan for the
second semester should file their ap-
plications in Room 2, University Hall,
at once.
Office of the Dean of Students
School of Business Administration
Assembly: Mr. Emmett Connely,
President of The First of Michigan
Corporation and President of the
U.S. Brings Charges
Against Local Chemist

Investment Bankers Association of
America, will address an assembly of
the School of Business Administra-
tion today in the Amphitheatre of
the Rackham Building at 3 o'clock,
on "The Present Status and Future
Prospects of Investment Banking."
Students in the School of Business
Administration are expected to at-
tend and others interested are in-
vited
The Dictaphone Station will be in
the Council Room, 1009 Angell Hall,
until further notice. Insofar as
possible the work will be carried
on in the regular manner. How-
ever, there will not be telephone
service and it will be necessary for
all persons to call in person at the
office. Repairs to the office necessi-
tate this temporary change.
German Departmental Library :All
books are due January 20.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
Iments and Occupational Information
has received from the United States
Civil Service Commission, notice of
the following examinations:
Translator. Optional Languages
Dano-Norwegian, Dutch, French,
German, Hebrew, Italian, Magyar,
Modern Greek, Polish, Portugese,
Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Yiddish.
Closing date February 10, 1941; Sal-
ary: Junior Translator, $1800.00,
Assistant Translator, $2,000.00; Sen-
ior Translator, $2,300.00.
Information on file at the Bureau,
201 Mason Hall, hours 9-12 and 2-4.
Academic Notices
English 121: The course in the
English Romantic Poets will be giv-
en at 9 o'clock on Monday, Wed-
nesday and Friday. The hour stated
in the catalogue has been cancelled
in favor of the earlier hour. (English
121, MWF, 9, 2225 A. H.)
Bacteriology seminar on Monday,
January 20, at 8:00 p.m., in Room

1564 East Medical Building. Sub-
ject: "Recent Developments in Ty-
phoid." All interested are invited.
Sociology 157, Dr. L. J. Carr, Room
D., Haven Hall. 2:00 p.m., will not
meet today. Class will meet on Mon-
day, January 20, at 2:00 p.m.
Zoology 31 (Organic Evolution):
Answers to questions 135-147 may be
withheld until Jan. 22 in order to use
information contained in the lecture
of Jan. 21.-A. Franklin Shull.
Required Hygiene Lectures for Wo-
men, 1941: All first and second sem-
ester freshmen women are required
to take the hygiene lectures, which
are to be given the second semester.
Upperclass women who have not com-
pleted the hygiene lectures, or their
equivalent Hygiene 101, should also
enroll for these lectures, at the time
of regular classification at Waterman
Gymnasium. Any women who did
not complete the lecture series in
a previous year are urged to attend
the lectures so that they may pass
the final examination, thereby com-
pleting the requirement.
Students should enroll for one of
the following sections. Each section
will meet at the same hour and day
each week for seven weeks.
Section No. 1, Monday. 4:15-5:15.
Date of first meeting. February 24:
Room: Natural Science Aud.
Section No. 2: Tuesday, 4:15-5:15.
Date of first meeting, February 25;
Room: Natural Science Aud.
(Continued on Page 4)
VOTED ONE OF THE
10 BEST FOR 1940!
NOW PLAYING!
LOADED WITH
DYNAMITE!
This mighty drama of the sea
. . a story of primitive human
joys and hatreds as only
Eugene O'Neill could write it[

LAW
SCHOOL
FOUNDED 1899
AN
ACCREDITED
LAW SCHOOL
TEXT and CASE
METHOD
For Catalog recom.
mended list of pre-legal
subjects and booklet
"Studyof Lawand Proper
Preparationo.address:
Edward T. Lee. Dean.

COURSES
(40 weeks peryear)
Afternoon-34 years
5 days..4:30-6:30
Evening -4 years
Mon., Wed., Fri..
6:30-9:20
Post-graduate
l year..twicea week
Practice courses
exclusively.
All courses lead
to degrees.
Two years' college
work required for
entrance.
New classes form
in Feb. and Sept.

Department Now Housed
In Old Health Service
Because Of Expansion
Ay ROSEMARY RYAN
"The University museum, famous
for its unusual collection of fishes
and plants is indebted in part to
the Institute For Fishes Research
who supply them with much of their
material,". said Dr. Albert S. Haz-
zard, Director of the Institute in a
recent interview.
The Institute has lately moved in-
to the old Health Service building
because the expanding. staff felt
the need of more room than was
afforded in the museum proper. The
entire second floor, attic and base-
ment are now occupied by the De-
partment. The first floor has been
given over to WPA rooms for the
museums project in research. Funds
for the maintenance of the building
are supplied by the Department of
Conservatiop from the, fees obtained

by the sale of hunting and fishing
licenses.
The Institute investigated the con-
ditions in streams and lakes and
charts them according to their depth,
area, type of bottom, and distribution
of weed beds. These maps aid theI
Department in determining the types
of fish that are better suited for sur-
vival under the existing conditions.
In 1935, the Department made an:
intensive study of the relationship
between beaver dams and trout to
determine if they aid or harm fish-
ing conditions. A poll, taken among
the sportsmen, showed a diversity of
opinion and it was later discovered
that both groups had been right.t
The dams were advantageous in the
faster trout streams, but in those
that followed a slower course, they3
clogged the water and resulted in
the death of the fish. A program of
beaver dam removal was then in-
augurated to rid the streams of un-
used dams. Those that contained
food would be rebuilt by the beavers
and allowed to continue. The Insti-
tute is still investigating this con-
dition.
A book edited by the Michigan De-
partment of Conservation entitled
Improvement of Lakes and Fishing
has been helpful to several other
states who are faced with possible
extinction of the fish in some of their
waters.

MICHIGAN
-NOW SHOWING--

315 Plymouth Ct., Chicago, Ill.

ART CINEMA LEAGUE presents
7* *Op*,The Iecompearabe DOROTHY THOMPSON:
-LibrtyMagazine RCA flm done with hon-
estyimHl
" " an~cd, immen1e tln
Illire I shall never far et it/
4 Fim e dv BoVianger English Titles by JOHN ERSKINE
MEN DELSSOH N THEATRE
TONIGHT and Saturday at 8:30
Admission 35c Tickets on sale at Box Office.
For Reservations call 6300 after 10:30 A.M.

II

I

Surgeons Pick
Prof. Badgley
Academy Head,

l
;,

Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the
history department will be the Hillel
Foundation's guest when he addresses
the Fireside Discussion group at 8:15
p.m. today.
Professor Slosson will speak, on the
general topic of "This Changing
World" in which he will present a
general survey of the present inter-
national situation. V
The Fireside Discussion follows the
regular Friday night Conservative
services which will be conducted by
David Davidson, Grad.; Jack Lewin-
Epstein, '42; and'David Crohn, '43.
RAF Planes Batter
Nazi Coastal Towns
(Continued from Page 1)

DETROIT, Jan. 16-VP)-Charged
with violating the food and drug
laws, Robert McClintock, Ann Arbor
manufacturing chemist, stood mute
today on arraignment before U.S.
comissioner J. Stanley Hurd.
McClintock is charged with selling
a stomach remedy by mail at five
dollars per bottle. Assistant U. S.
District Attorney Peter E. Gilbert
said tests had sown the remedy lack-
ing in any curative powers.

Quick-witted DRI SCOLL,
brilliantly played by
Thomas Mitchell, Academy
Award winner.

Matinees 25c Unusual Occupations
Nights 40c NEWS
il. tax ODDITY

on Bauhafen, a harbor where lie some
of Germany's most vital slipways,
docks, engineering works, storehouses,
assembling sheds, armor plate shops,
foundries, iron works and gun stores.
One stick of bombs evidently
touched off explosive stores. The
pilot said two explosions followed the
bursting of his bombs and these
threw debris 1,000 fet into the air.
A half-square mile of fire was
noted west of Bauhafen, while by the
power station, north of the harbor,
flames burned "even more fiercely
than elsewhere."

F7

YES, MY DARLING DAUGHTER
DINAH SHORE GENE KRUPA
ANVIL CHORUS
GLENN MILLER
I HEAR A RHAPSODY
CHARLIE BARNET JIMMY DORSEY
STARDUST
TEMPTATION
ARTIE SHAW
STARDUST
SWANEE RIVER
TOMMY DORSEY
SOMEBODY LOVES ME
MY MAN
DINAH SHORE
LET'S DO IT
TONY PASTOR
YOU'VE GOT ME THIS WAY
GLENN MILLER
MEMPHIS BLUES
DINAH SHORE
CELERY STALKS AT MIDNIGHT
WILL BRADLEY
IF I DIDN'T CARE
INK SPOTS
700 inw

Close-mouthed SMITTY
(ran Hunter)... who kept
his trouble to himself.

I

I

like
money
from
home .. .
THAT'S WHAT

I

I

Simple-hearted OLEY, who
was going home at last.
(John Wayne's finest role).
(4tet UWnger PRESENTS
JOHN FORD'S Production of
EUGENE O'NEILL'S
t
The LONG
VOYAG
HOME
JOHN THOMAS JAN
WAYNE - MITCHELL - HUNTED
Pro cted by JoHN FORD
Adapted by Dudley Nichols
Produced 'by Argosy Corporation
Released thru United Arists

YOUR

SAV I NGS

WILL MEAN-IF
I You're wise and fakenadvannfnn of

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