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June 05, 1941 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-06-05

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Li.iV1 7 .L- dlJl li:r. J'..la7 Z.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

''AGE THR

THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 1941 PAGE THREE

Michigan

Errors

Enable

California

To

Cop

Opener,_5-2

(q) _______________________ _______________________

Bear's Pitcher
Scatters Nine
Varsity Blows

Hammett And Stille Are

O

Mike Koll Catches
Wolveridrs Off
Stoddard Hurls

three
Base;
Today.

® Sports Hash a la California
* That Kid Wakefield
, JyI HAL WILSON
Daily Sports Editor

Elected TennisCo-Captains
Eight Wolverine ThincladsTo Head
e' For Pacific Coast Track Meets Soon

Both Jumiors
Turn in Fim
1941 Rlec(
Duo Replaces Jim To
Co-Captaincy Is
In Net Squad's Hi
(Continued from Page 1>)

(Continued from Page 1)

bin;
First
story

the throw. Bill Cartmill then flied
out to Ed Ongerth in centerfield and
Ruehle ended the frame by being.
caught off second.
The Wolverines retained their lead
until the sixth inning when their in-
field fell to pieces behind Pitcher
Cliff Wise. Stan Griffith started
things with a single but was forced
at second by Harold Cates. Carl Ho-
berg, husky Bear catcher, then singled
Cates to third.
With men on first and third, Ray
Anling hit a grounder to Chamber-I
lain at third. Bud fielded the ball
cleanly and promptly threw it into
right field, Cates scoring and H-
berg .going to third. When Bill Step-
pon fumbled Wakefield's throw from
right field, Hoberg went home. Am-
ling started for third but turned back
and was thrown out by Sofiak who
had retrieved the ball.
California put the game in the bag
with two runs in the eighth stanza on
a double and a stolen base by Cates,
a walk to Hoberg, another error by
Chamberlain and a single by Jack
Albright, Bear shortstop.
Just tq make their lead secure, the
Westerners added another tally in
their half of the ninth frame to run
their total for the day to five. After
Whitey Holman, Michigan leftfielder,
had retired pitcher Koll with a mar-
velous running catch of his line drive,
Wise pitched a walk to Ed Ongerth
and a base-hit to Griffith.
At- this point, Mase Gould, left-
handed Michigan relief pitcher, came-
to the rescue and fanned Cates, the
first batter to face him. While Mase
was preparing to pitch to Haberg,
Ongerth broke for home and scored
when the little southpaw's throw to
the plate was high. Gould then re-
tired the side without further scor-
.. ing.
Michigan threatened in the ninth
when S'teppon walked, went to sec-
and on Wakefield's infield single and
scored on Chamberlain's base-hit.
Ruehle and Cartmill were easy outs
but George Harms drew a pass to
fill the bases with two down. Coach
Fisher then sent Wayne Christenson
to the plate to bat for Gould but
Chris, after running the count to
two-and-two, missed a curve ball to
end the game.
Those Errors Again

_ i

( ALIFORNIA'S veteran baseball coach, Clint
his chair in the Union Lobby last night.
"this kid Wakefield looks an awful lot like our
mer."

Evans, leaned forward from
"You know," he remarked,
quarter-miler, Grover Klem-

1
r
I
I

Billy Fallon, the Bear's trainer, nodded agreement, adding that the 1
Wolverines' sensational sophomore outfielder was perhaps just a little
taller than the California trackman who blazed a 46.4 second 440-yard E
dash last week to equal the world's record.T
And both agreed that Dick possessed vast potentialities as a baseball1
player, judging from the general impression he left in yesterday's 5-2 loss
to Evans' touring nine, even though the lanky Wolverine didn't take as manyt
liberties with the southpaw offerings of Bear hurler, Mike Koll, as he has
with Midwestern pitching all season. "I remember when his dad, Howard
Wakefield, used to catch in the major leagues quite a few years ago," Fallon
declared, "and he used to be quite a ball player, too. This kid'll have to goA
some to equal his dad, but he looks like he. has the makings."
The effervescent Evans needed no prompting to recall last fall's
Michigan-California football game at Berkeley. "You fellows had a
great outfit that day," he grinned, "and I certainly didn't think any
team in the nation could beat you last season. I heard that Minnesota
game over the radio out in California, and that sure must have been
a tough one to lose." We agreed.
Both Evans and Fallon report bad news for the rest of the Big Ten
is brewing up in the Northlands of Minnesota again. "We were just up,
there last week at Minneapolis to play the Gophers," Evans said, '/and even
Bernie Bierman is almost optimistic about next 'fall's Gopher gridiron
chances." "I asked Bernie if he had most of his veterans returning for
action," Clint miled, "and Bernie replied yes, but he isn't sure they can
beat out the gridiron giants who are moving up from the best freshman
squad in years. That's a tough spot for Berne, isn't it?" We agreed.
Back in 1925 Fallon used to train here at Michigan, and he remem-
bers well the era of mighty Wolverine football machines under the coach-
ing of Fielding Yost. "That bunch you brought to Berkeley last fall
looked a lot like the Michigan teams of the past," Billy declared, "and,
say, wasn't that Harmon a terrific player, though?" We agreed.
EVANS HOLDS A HIGH REGARD for professional baseball as a living-
if a man has enough .talent to hold down a steady job in the higher
circuits. But he always encourages his players to graduate from college
first. "if a young lad combines a good education with a considerable amount
of talent," Evans asserted, "he has a great future in pro ball. He can play
for maybe 10 or 12 years, drawing a good salary, and then with his educa-
tion and name, usually nab a pretty good job upon retirement."
And more than one of Evans' California baseball aces have done just
that. Latest protege to gain fame in the majors is Sam Chapman, who
followed Fvans' advice to graduate before turning professional in 1938. Im-
mediatelv lafter receiving his diploma, the Bears' All-American football full-
back and star outfielder signed with Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics,
and within two hours after he reached the Quaker City, was in uniform
and playing in the first major league game he ever saw.
That same year Clint took his championship squad on a tour simi-
lar to the present one which extended into the East, and the entire squad
stopped off at Philadelphia to watch their former teammate break up
the second game of a double-header when he scored the vwinning run.
WALLON AND 'EVANS had plenty of other interesting things to say-an
hour and a half's worth. Everything from the inevitable California
weather to the Bears' great battery of Koll and Hoberg to lacrosse to high
school entrance credits was on the conversational docket. And much more
besides.,

two years, also owns quite an en-
viable record for this ,year. The
"Duke" has won 12 out of his 18
matches in singles, and 15 out of his
18 battles in doubles.
Last week in Chicago, he was beat-
en in the finals after a hard three
set struggle wtih Henry Nosek of
Minnesota. In doubles he and Jim
Porter were eliminated in the sec-
cnd round by Kemetick and Self of
Chicago.
Aside from spending most of his
spare time on the tennis courts try-
ing to improve his already difficult
service, Wayne is quite a familiar
figure in the billiard room of the
Union. It is here that he has won
the ping pong championship of the
University five times in a row, the
three cushion billiard title, and the
pocket billiard crown.
At the present time he has reached
the final round of this semester's
ping pong championship and will
attempt to gain the title Monday
evening when the finals are to be
played off.
Earlier this semester, he captured
the all-campus bowling championship
by beating Jeff Pace in the final
round.
Wayne is affiliated with Theta Del-
ta Chi fraternity as well as being a
member of Druids, honorary Senior
society.
Tobin and Howie Bacon are the
only members of this year's squad
who will not be returning to play
tennis for the Maize and Blue next
season. Back to help the two co-cap-
tains retain the Western Conference
title will be Jim Porter, number three
man; Tom Gamon, fifth singles play-
er and winner of the fifth bracket
Big Ten championship; Alden John-
son, sixth singles player and winner
of the sixth division title; Gerry
Schaflander, doubles partner of Gam-
on; and Jim Bourquin and Roy Brad-
ley, reserve lettermen of this year.
National Open Gets
Under Way Today
FORT WORTH, Tex., June 4.--(P)
--The principal actors in the 45th
U.S. open Golf championship went
through their final dress rehearsal
today at the Colonial Club.
Who the star will be for the 72
holes remains to be seen. It may be
a repeat performance for the mar
who drew the biggest hand a yea
ago at Cleveland, Big Lawson Littl
of San Francisco. But local sentiment
says it,'s going to be a Texan, and of
the Texans the reigning favorite is
Byron Nelson.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 7, Washington 4
Chicago 6, Philadelphia 1
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BsnYesterday's Result
Boston 4, St. Louis 2

By BOB STAHL
Immediately after finals are fin-,
ished, eight members of the Wolver-
ine track squad will set out for the
West Coast where they will compete
in the Big Ten-Pacific Coast meet at
Los Angeles on June 17th, and the
National Intercollegiates at Palo Alto
on June 21st and 22nd.
Qualifying for the first meet by
having finished either first, second,
or third in the Big Ten meet held
at Minneapolis last month, the same
men will stay over .for the National
Intercollegiates, where they will com-
pete individually for titles and will
not be seeking a team crown for
Michigan.
Heading the list of Wolverine thin-
clads who have decided to "Go West"
will be sandy-haired Warren Breid-
enbach, the fastest half -miler in
Michigan history. Termed by many
track experts as one of the best run-
ning stylists of all time, Breidenbach
will carry his smooth racing stride
into competition against such stars
as lanky Campbell Kane of Indiana,
present Big Ten titleholder and the
man who nosed Breidenbach out in
the last yard of the half-mile race
in the Conference meet, and Clarence
Barnes, the sensational speedster
from the University of California.
Canham Ends Collegiate Career
Winding up his spectacular collegi-
ate track career along with Breiden-
bach will be Wolverine Capt. Don
Canham, high-jumper extra-ordin-
ary and the only Michigan athlete
ever to hold a National Intercollegi-
ate individual track title, one which

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he holds jointly with John Wilson place in the Big Ten 440 yard dash
of Southern California. will be a member of the Big Ten mile
Canham, who also holds the Big relay team, composed of Roy Coch-
Ten high jump crown, has jumped ran and Paul Jenkins of Indiana,
>ver 6 feet 7 inches during his career Bob Porter of Ohio State, and Ufer.
out he has been bothered by an in- The Michigan quarter-miler will also
jured heel during the past several run the 440 in the National Intercol-
months which has hampered his legiate meet.
style considerably. Up against such Wedenoja In Pole Vault
stars as Les Steersof Oregon, who Johnny Kautz and Wilbert Weden-
cracked the world record wide open oja round out the list of Wolverines
recently with a leap of 6 feet 10 7-8 entered in the two California meets.
inches and Wilson, who jumped 6 Kautz, a half-miler who has consist-
feet 8 inches last week, everything ently run the distance under 1:54
will depend on Canham's bruised heel seconds, finished behind Kane and
to decide how good a showing he is Breidenbach in the Big Ten meet,
to make against these boys. but still pressed the winners all the
Piel To Make Trip way to the finish tape.
Captain-elect Al Piel, who qualified Wedenoja is the pole-vaulter who
for the trip by placingsthird in the plugged along unnoticed the whole
Big Ten 220 yard dash, will also year, always finishing behind team-
make the jaunt to the coast. Michi- mate Charlie Decker until the dual
gan's ace sprinter of the past year, meet with Ohio State when he tied
Piel set a new Michigan AAU 220 for first place. Then Wilb went on
mark at Ypsilanti last Saturday of to gain a surprising second-place tie
21.4 seconds and indicated that big in the Conference meet with a leap
things can be expected of him in the of 12 feet 10 inches, and so qualified'
two California meets.- for the trip to California.
Another of Michigan's star sprint-
ers, Al Thomas, will be demonstrat-
ing his wares and perhaps his heels
to the Pacific Coast trackmen. Thom-
as finished third in the 100 yard
dash in the Conference meet and
ran the anchor leg on the Michigan
mile relay team which won that event
at Minneapolis. Al will probably
concentrate on -the century' and the 4
220 out on the Coast.
Perry Kimerer, Wolverine javelin
thrower, will also be west-coast bound
as soon as he finishes his finals.
Bothered by a bad arm which kept
him out of most of the outdoor com-
petition this year, Kimerer came
back to win the javelin throw in the
Michigan-Ohio State meet and placed "
third in the Conference meet with
a heave of 180 feet 1 inch.
Ufer In Mile Relay This is one way to
Bob Ufer, on the basis of his fourth

Fred 'Haney Fired;
Luke Sewell Hired
As lBrownie Head
ST. LOUIS, June 4.-UP)-President
Don Barnes of the St. Louis Browns
announced tonight Fred Haney was
being replaced as manager of the club
by Luke Sewell, Cleveland coach.
Sewell will take charge of the team
tomorrow.
He was signed to a contract cover-
ing the remainder of this season and
all of next year, Barnes said. Terms
of the contract were not disclosed.
Although a change of manager had
been rumored for some time, the an-
nouncement - Barnes notified the
press himself - came as somewhat of
a surprise less than two hours after
the Browns had won their second
straightgame from Washington to
move out of the cellar into seventYh
place.
Barnes said he did not care to
comment on the poor showing of the
club thus far.

Commencement
Are
Burr, Patterson & Aulad
1209 South University
RUTH ANN OAKES, Mgr.

il keep cool - but there

s a better one...
TRY
ARBOR
SPRINGS
WATER
Phone 8270

CALIFORNIA A
Ongerth, cf ......
Griffith, 3b ......
Cates, if ...,....
Hoberg, c ...,... .
Amling, rf . ..... .
McBroom, 2b ....
Albright, ss..,.. .
Wilson,lb.....
Koll, p ..........

1 RHx

4
5
5
2
5
2
3
4
4g

1
0
2
2
0
0
0
0

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2
2
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0
1
1
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4
1
3
7
0
3
0
.9

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0
2
0
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1
2
2
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5

E'
0
0
0
0
0
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0

"Well, it's been a great trip so far, and we've enjoyed our stay here
at Michigan a lot," Evans concluded. "Maybe we can make it two in a
row tomorrow afternoon." We didn't agree. . .

- _.

:

U.

Totals .......34 5,8 27 13 1

Major League Standings

MICHIGAN AB
Sofiak, ss ........2
Holman, If.......4
Steppon, 2b.......3
Wakefield, rf .... 3
Chamberlain, 3b .. 4
Ruehle, lb....... 3
Cartmill, cf....... 4
Harms, c,.........3
Wise, p ......,....3
Gould, p.........0
Christenson . ..... 1

R
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

H
0
1
0
2
3
1
1
0
1
0
0

0
1
2
4
2
0
13
3
1
1
0
0

A
4
0
7
0
1
2
0
1
2
0
0

E
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
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0

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Cleveland......
Chicago .......
New York ......
Boston ..........
Philadelphia .....
Detroit..........
St. Louis........
Washington..... .

W
30
27
25
22
23
24
15
16

L
19
18
21
19
22
23
29
31

Pe$s.
.612
.600
.543
.537
.511
.511
.341
.340Q

GB
1
3%/z
4
5
5
12/2
13

Brooklyn.,.....
St. Louis ........
New York ......
Cincinnati.....
Chicago.........
Pittsburgh......
Boston..........
Philadelphia ....

W
32
32
22
21
19
15
15
14

L
13
14
19
25
23
22
25
29

Pct. GB
.711
.696 %
.537 9
.457 11/
.452 11%
.504 13
.375 1412
.326 17

d-

Totals.......30 2 9 27 17 4
*Batted for Gould in ninth.
California ,,..... 000 002 021-5
Michigan....... 010 000 001-2
Runs batted in: Ruehle, Chamber-
lain, McBroom, Albright. Two-base
hits: Cart illnCates. Three-base
hit: Chamberlain. Sacrifice hits:
Ruehle, McBroom. Stqlen bases: On-
gerth, Cates, Chamberlain. Double
plays: Griffith to Wilson; Sofiak to
Steppon to Ruehle. Left on bases:
Michigan 7, California 9. .Hits bff
Wise, 8 in 8 1-3 innings; off Gould,
0 in 2-3. Struck out: by Koll, 4; by
Gould 1. Bases on balls: off Koll, 5;
off Wise, 5; off Gould, 1. Losing pit-
cher, Wise. Umpires: Andrews and
Fishman.

So]Lo ngT'llFa ll

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IT'S MORE FUN GOING HOME BY BOAT
To Cleveland and Beyond ... To Buffalo and Beyond
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NOW is the time?
Get Your Tickets Today!

BUT BEFORE YOU GO-
We'd like to thank you for the splendid cooperation you
have shown us during the past year. It is only through
your patronage that we have been able to maintain the
rating of one of the finest men's stores in Ann Arbor.
When you return next fall you will find the same high
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phere which has characterised Stadel & Walker service
for years.

IT COsTs NO MORE
Surprising as it may be, D&C student cruises actually cost no more
than land transportation. Why not enjoy the added luxury of
a D&C cruise.

N , '2
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From the time you leave the dock at Detroit to the time you arrive
at your home we take care of all trunk transfers and other trouble-
some details. All you have to do is have a good time.

..At _ .. _ t _ .

U

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idake Your Arrangements Now
AT GOOtEW FLORAL CO.
State Street next to Slater's

C

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