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June 05, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-06-05

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PA1E TWO

TH'E MTCI-TiETAN IbATT.V

T TIR']DA, ". J :TNE 5. 1941

a w. i V ii . V 21 li L'L 1 L 1 +
__

L 110.1 A v JT i ..MS7LT U) 117iY&

Engine School
enior Picnic
To Be June 18
Annual Event Is Scleduled
For Island; Baseball
Games To Be Featured
With finals over and out of mind,
senior engineers should have the time
of their lives at their annual picnic to
be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday, June 18,
on the Island.
Expected to be the biggest in years
by virtue of the fact that it is being
held after examinations instead of
during the period as in previous years,
the picnic will feature inter-depart-
mentbaseball games this year.
Scheduled to battle it out with Ro-
bert McCamey's chemical engineering
team is a team of electrical engineers
under co-captains Steve Gawura
and Richard White, while the aero-
nautical students will see what they
can do against captain Bill Vollmer
and his crew of mechanical engin-
eers.
Although senior engineers who
have paid up their class dues will
be allowed to attend free, those who
are delinquent may either buy tickets
or pay their dues to Seymour Fur-
bush, general chairman of the pic-
nic, or Harold Britton.-
Captains of the various teams have
announced that all members of their
respective departments wishing to
play should contact them as soon as
possible, in order that the line-ups
may be made up. Additional games
will be scheduled if desired, Furbush
said.
Although the picnic itself starts
at 3 p.m., those attending will meet
at the East Engineering Building at
2:30, to go out to the Island together.
Charles Tieman is assisting Fur-.
bush in making plans for the picnic.
Refreshments will be provided.
David M1Villiken Will Give
Master's Recital Today
David Milliken, Grad., will give a
piano recital in fulfillment of the re-
quirements for his Degree of Master
of Music at 8:30 p.m. today in Rack-
ham Assembly Hall.
His program will include "Thirty-
three Variations on a Waltz by Dia-
belli," Opus 120 by Beethoven, and
Schumann's "Phantasie," Opus 17.
A native of New Orleans, Milliken
gave frequent recitals, one under the
auspices of the New Orleans Philhar-
monic Society as the result of winning
a young artists' contest.

Ann Arbor

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Here Is Today's
In Summary

News
'Y

....,. , a... J

hore than 3,00 personshpassed
through the cloisters of the Law
Quadrangle Tuesday to see the annual
Ann Arbor Citizens Flower Show, held
outdoors for the first time.
Police Chief Norman E. Cook
warned gasoline station and grocery
store operators not to sell aspirin or
other drugs, as that will make them
liable to prosecution under the state
drugs act.
Peddling of these drugs has been
carried on by salesmen who are not
regular wholesalers, so they are not
able to be prosecuted under existing
state laws. But proprietors who buy
their goods violate the law, drug sales'
within the city being limited to regis-'
tered druggists.
S* *
Students of the University High'
SGhool will present a concert of in-
strumental music at 7:30 p.m. today
in the school's auditorium, with the,
feature attraction to be an overture.
written and arranged by David Rose,,
tenth grade student.
The string orchestra is composed
of 35 members of the high school,
with the entire group comprising a
much larger number of the student
body.
* * *
Sixty-four local business firms have
joined the National Rating Associa-
tion, with plans to exchange informa-
tion regarding "poor credit risks," it
was reported yesterday.
The association will publish names
of bad paying customers in a "Red
Guide" which will be distributed
among the member firms. Persons
named for listing in the Guide will be
notified by mail and may keep their
names out by settling up their unpaid
bills or making satisfactory arrange-
ments with their creditors.
Ruthven mill Deliver
commencement Talk
President Alexander G. Ruthven
will deliver a commencement talk
to the graduating class of Grosse
Pointe Country Day School today.
His address will commemorate the
25th anniversary of the school, this
year graduating the first class in its
history to be prepared for college.
Previously when the students had fin-
ished the tenth grade they had to go
elsewhere to finish their prep school
training.
Stop Press Release
WASHINGTON, June 4--(A)-Sec-
retary Knox announced today the
Navy Department would issue no
more press releases on contracts it
makes with individual contractors.

THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 1941
VOL. LI. No. 177
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices
Student Accounts: Your attention
is called to the following rules passed
by the Regents at their meeting ofI
February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than the
last day of classes of each semester
or Summer Session. Student loans
which are not paid or renewed are
subject to this regulation; however,
student loan not yet due are ex-
empt. Any unpaid accounts at the
close of business on the last day of
classes will be reported to the Cashier
of the University, and
"(a) All academic credits will be
withheld, the grades for the semester
or Summer Session just completed
will not be released, and no transcript,
of credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to register
in any subsequent semester or Sum-,
mer Session until payment has been
made."
Shirley W, Smith,
Vice-President and Secretary
Commencement Week Programs:
Programs may be obtained on request
after today at the Business Office,
Room 1, University Hall.
Herbert G. Watkins
Notice: University Commencement
Announcement: The University Com-
mencement exercise will be held on
Ferry Field, Saturday afternoon, June
21, The gates open at 5:00 p.m. Au-
dience should be seated by 5:45 p.m.,
when 'procession enters the field.
The public address system will be
interfered with by outside sounds, and
the audience is therefore requested
to avoid conversation and moving
about. Automobile owners are asked
kindly to keep their machines away
from the vicinity of Ferry Field dur-
ing the exercises.
Tickets maysbe secured at the
Business Office, University of Michi-
gan, Room 1, University Hall, until
6:00 p.m., Saturday, June 21. All
friends of the University are welcome
to tickets. There will be no admis-
sion without tickets.
In case of rain, the exercises will
be transferred to Yost Field House,
to which the special Yost Field House
tickets only will admit. These tickets
are also available at the Business
Office, Room 1, University Hall, and
will be issued 2 to each graduate. The
Ferry Field ticket will not admit to
Yost Field House.
If it becomes necessary to transfer
tre exercises from Ferry Field, out-
doors, to the Field House, indoors,
after the exercises have started, per-
sons will be admitted to the Field
House without tickets until the seat-
ing capacity is exhausted.
If it is decided in advance of start-
ing the procession to hold the exer-
cises in Yost Field House, the power
house whistle will be blown at inter-
vals between 5:00 and 5:10 p.m. on
Commencement afternoon.
Herbert G. Watkins,
Assistant Secretary
The following schedule will mark
the lifting of the Automobile Reg-
ation for students in the various
colleges and departments of the Uni-
versity. Exceptions will not be made
for individuals who complete their
work in advance of the last day of
class examinations. All students en-
rolled in the following departments
will be required to adhere strictly
to this schedule. College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts: All class-
es. Tuesday, June 17, 1941, at noon.
College of Architecture: All classes.
Tuesday, June 17, 1941, at noon.
College of Pharmacy: All classes.
Monday, June 16, 1941, at noon.
School of Business Administration:

All classes. Monday, June 16, 1941,
at 5 p.m.
School of Education: All classes.
Tuesday, June 17. 1941, at noon.

School of Engineering: All classes.3
Tuesday, June 17, 1941, at noon. t
School of Forestry and Conser-I
vation: All classes. Friday June 13,
1941, at 5 p.m.
School of Music: All classes. Tues-
day, June 17, 1941, at noon.-
School of Dentistry: Freshman
Class-Wednesday, June 11, 1941, at
noon. Sophomore Class - Saturday,z
June 7, 1941, at noon. Junior Class1
-Tuesday, June 10, 1941, at noon.
Senior Class-Thursday, June 5, 1941,
at noon.
Hygienists: First year-Monday,
June 16, at 5 p.m. Second year-
Saturday, June 7, at noon.
Law School: Freshman Class --
Monday, June 9, at 5 p.m. Junior
Class, Tuesday, June 10, at noon. Sen-,
ior Class-Tuesday, June 3, at 5 p.m.
Medical School: Freshman Class-
Thursday,"June 12, at noon. Sopho-
more Class--Saturday, June 14, at
noon. Junior Class-Saturday, June
14, at noon. Senior Class-Saturday,
June 7, 1941, at noon.
Graduate School: All classes. June
17, at noon.
Candidates for Master's Degrees:
June 17, at noon.
Candidates for Doctor's Degrees:'
June 17. at noon.
Office of the Dean of Students
Closing hours for women during
Final Examination Period are the
same as usual: 10:30 Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday, Thursday nights:
1:30 Friday night; 12:30 Saturday
night, (1:30 for Seniors), 11:00 Sun-
day night. When every girl in the
house has completed her examina-
tions, the closing hour during the
week is 11:00.
Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts: It is requested by
the Administrative Board that all in-
structors who make reports of Incom-
plete, or Absent from Examination on
grade-report-sheets give also infor-
mation showing the character of the
part of the work which has been com-
pleted. This may be done by the use
of the symbols, I (A), X (D), etc.
E. A. Walter
Students and Faculty, College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts: The
attention of students and faculty is
called to the following regulations of
the College:
Students are not examined at any
other time than that set for the ex-
amination of the class in which the
work has been done. When an entire
class is affected by a conflict in the
examination schedule, a special ex-
amination during the examination
period may be arranged by the in-
structor, with the consent of the Ex-
amination Schedule Committee.
It should be noted that a report of
X (Absent from Examination) does
not guarantee a make-up examina-
tion. An instructor must, in fairness
to those who take the final examina-
tion at the time announced for it,
give make-up examinations only to
students who have a legitimate reason
for absence.
E. A. Walter
German Haus to be conducted in
the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity, 1443
Washtenaw Avenue, during the Sum-
mer Session. Room and board for
men for entire eight-week period,
$29.00 (luncheon and dinner, Mon-
day through Friday). Single and
double rooms. Women may take meals
only (luncheon and dinner, thirty-
five and forty-five cents respective-
ly). Call German Department, 204
University Hall, for reservations.
All contestants for Ilopwood prizes
are requested to call for their manu-
scripts on Monday, June 9. The room
will be open from 8 to 12 and from 2
to 5:30. Copies of the judges' com-
ments on individual manuscripts
may be obtained at the desk.
All students who have won Hop-
wood prizes will be notified xIot later
than Friday morning, June 6.

Men's Residence Halls: Men who
have received contracts for the school

year 1941-42 should sign and return
the yellow copy to the Office of the
Dean of Students at once.
JGP script synopses due July 1.
Please turn in all synopses to the
Undergraduate Office of the League.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
nients and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
Civil Service Examinations. Last
date for filing application is noted
in each case:
Michigan Civil Service
State Police Trooper, salary, see
notice, June 12, 1941.
Complete announcement on file at
the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall. Office
hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
nents and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
Civil Service Examinations. Ldast
date for filing application is noted
in each case:
Ufiited Mtates Civil Service
Electrotyper (finisher); Electro-
typer (Molder); Stereotyper, salary,
$1.32 per hour, 40 hour week, July 2,
1941.
Junior Clerk, salary $1,440 per yr.,
June 16, 1941.
Complete announcements on file
at the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall. Office
hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
Academic Notices

I and II for unavoidable conflicts:
Tuesday, June 10, 7-10 p.m., 2225 A.H.
Economics 173: Accounting exami-
nation will be held in Room C Haven
Hall on Monday, June 16, 2-5 p.m.
German Department. Room As-
signments for final examinations in
German 1, 2, 31, 32. June 7, 1941, 2-5
p.m.:
German 1: All sections 25 A.H.
German 2: Gaiss, Edwards, Van
Duren, Willey, Sinnema, Pott, Strie-
dieck-West Lecture Physics.
Ebelke, Philippson, 231 Angell Hall.
Diamond, 35 Angell Hall.

German 31: All sections, D.H.H.
German 32: Pott, West Lecture
Physics; Nordmeyer, 203 U.H.; Wahr,
301 U.H.; Diamond, 35 A.H.; Eaton,
306 U.H.; Van Duren, 205 M.H.; Rei-
chart, 201 U.H.; Graf, 305 S.W.
History 12, Lecture II: Final ex-
amination, Thursday, June 12, 2-5
p.m. Mr. Brown's, Mr. Clark's and
Mr. Stanton's sections will meet in
Alumni Memorial lecture room. Mr.
Rupke's, Ir. Slosson's and Mr. Thor-
ner's sections will meet in Natural
Science auditorium.
History 38, Final examination:
(Continued on Page 6)

MATINEE TODAY

G~~~uthyr

"Ladies in Retiremnent"
By EDWARD PERCY and REGINALD DENHAM
Best M itrder-Mystery-Mclodra nia in Years."
--WALTER WINCHELL
EvE- NINGS through Saturday at 8:30
My ATINEES today and Saturday at 3:1 5
Priceu - 2.0) --- 1.50 - 1.10-- 85c - 55c
Phone 6300

[

1 94 1 D RA MA T IC

S EASON

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre

English I and Il-Finial
tion-Sat., June 7, 9-12.

Examina-

ENGLISH I
Calver, 101 Ec.
Robertson, 101 Ec.
ENGLISH II
Arthos, 231 A.H.
Bader, 1025 A.H.
Baum, 231 A.H,
Bertram, 25 A.H.
Boys, 1025 A.H.
Engel, 103 R.L.
Everett, 3231 A.H.
Fletcher, W. Phys. Lect.
Garvin, 205 M.H.
Green, W. Phys. Lect.
Greenhut, W. Phys, Lect,
Haines, 25 A.H.
Hart, D Haven
Haugh, 1025 A.H.
Helm, 1025 A.H.
Martin, W. Phys. Lect.
McClennen, 2003 A.H.
McCormick, W. Phys. Lect.
Ogden, 35 A.H
O'Neill, 103 R.L.
Peake, 35 A.H.
Schenk, 205 M.H.
Schroeder, E Haven
Schueller, E Haven
Stibbs, 205 M.H
Walker, 103 R.L.
Weimer, 103 R.L.
Weisinger, 231 A.H.
Wells, 25 A.H.
White, 35 A.H.
Woodbridge, 103 R.L.
Make-up examination in English
BUY YOUR
LIFE INSURANCE
NOW!
When the cost is :ow.
when your health is good.
Before war clauses are announced.
E See or call
CLINTON E. PURiIY
agent for
IHE NoRTIwIESTERN MUTUAL
LIFE INSURANCE CO.
206 Wolverine Bldg. Tel. 7333

-____--
.-a - - - - - - -t
S----t. w---- - °-.,.- --- -
RIGHT. AFTER

: _,
:

COMMENCE GOiNG

FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
Second Semester, 1940-41
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
REGULAR EXAMINATIONS

* There's one thing 'most everybody
learns in college-you can go more
places for less money by Grey-
hound! And the time to put that
learnin' into practice is the day you
leave college-whether you're head-
ed for home, away somewhere on a
summer vacation, or off to a new
job in far parts. Don't walk, run--
to the nearest Super-Coach to start
saing money every mle you travel.
In oti'^r words, graduate to Grey-
hound!
GREYHOUND TERMINAL
116 W. HURON S'T.
PHONE 2-5511

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Sample One-Way Fares
Chicago...............$ 3.60
St. Louis...............6.50
Kansas City............ 10.25
Denver................. 18.45
Los Angeles............ 35.35
Cincinnati..............4.70
Cleveland..............3.0
Buffalo.........;........5.65
Albany.................9.55
Boston................. 11.55
New York......... . ,. 10.70
Pittsb urgh..............4.85
Washington, D.C........960
Philadelphia............9.85

Mon.;
Mon.;
Mon.
Mon.;
Mon.:
Mon.;
Mon.;
Tues.;
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.
Tues.;
Tues.
'Tues.;

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Thurs.,
Mon.,
Wed.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Sat.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Thurs.,
Fri.,
Tues.,
Fri.,
Sat.,

June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

12,
9,
11,
10,
16,
7'
9'
16,
10,
12,
13,
17,
.13,
14,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
9-12
2- 5

SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS
Special Period
No. Time of Examination Courses
I Sat., June 7, 2- 5 German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
II Wed., June 11, 2- 5 Zoology 1, Botany 1, Psychology 31
III Sat., June 14, 9-12 French 1, 2, 32, 52, 61, 62, 91, 153
IV Tues., June 17, 2- 5 Political Science 1, 2, 51, 52
IRREGULAR EXAMINATIONS
English 1 and 2 shall be examined on Saturday, June 7, 9-12
Economics 51, 52, and 54 shall be examined on Saturday, June 14, 2-5.
Economics 122 shall be examined on Tuesday, June 17, 2-5.
It shall be understood that classes entitled to the regular examination
periods shall have the right-of-way over the above-mentioned irregu-
lar examinations and that special examinations will be provided for
students affected by such conflicts by the courses utilizing the irregu-
lar examination periods.

SHOWS TODAY 2:00-4:17-7:00-9:20 P.M. III

'

Any deviation from the above schedule may be made only by mutual
Sgreement between students and instructor and with the approval of
the Examination Schedule Committee.

III

rI IlIf l fllfffVIIII IIR * I a A tit~utt on 1C rrnti lli

'

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