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June 04, 1941 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-06-04

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WEoNESDAY, JUNE 4, 1941

THE MIICHI GA N D A ILY

PAGE THREE

Nine Opens

Two-Game Series

With

Golden Bears

Today

r

lr> ,

111-
AND
INIDE~

Big Ten 'Champs To Meet
West Coast Baseball Team
(211ff Wie Will OppoeCalifornia's ter
flarler, Mike Koil, In Series Opener

The y'll Never Forget .. ,
WHAT CAN YOU SAY about a guy
like Lou Gehrig?
One of the greatest ball-players
that ever lived? A fine sportsman?
A swell guy? Sure, he was all of
those things but he was something
else too.
There was something about Geh-
rig when he stepped up to the plate
that inspired respect. We realized
it to the full for the first time
on an afternoon in May of 1939
when we sat in the stands at
Briggs Stadium and heard the park
announcer say, "Dahlgren, first
base."
A hushed murmur ran through the
stands. Dahlgren at first? What about
Gehrig? Sure, he'd been in a hitting
slump but you don't bench a man
like Gehrig for going hitless a few
times.
A minute later, the big guy stepped
out of the Yankee dugout with the
lineup in his hand and trudged to-
ward the plate with it. Then, for the
first time, we saw a crowd of people
at a baseball game embarrassed. They
looked at one another questioningly
and almost seemed to be trying not
to see Lou. Finally, somebody started
clapping. The others took it up andl
then the entire crowd rose to its feet1
and applauded.
We couldn't believe it. This may
sound over-sentimental and foolish
but we remember vividly thinking
that something would happen be-
fore the game was over and that
Lou would take over at first base.
But nothing did. Dahlgren didn't
get hurt. The Yankees didn't need a
pinch hitter and the game ended
without Gehrig. The score was 22-2,
with the Yankees on the long end.
It was the worst beating the Tigers
had taken in almost 30 years. Don't
ever try to tell us that the Yankees
just happened to have a good day.
Nothing could have beaten them that
afternoon. Maudlin or not, they won
that one for Lou.
W.. fe met Lsou Gehrig once. He
came out to the Philippines with a
barnstorming all-star team and we
were living in Manila at the time.
Somebody took us down to the dug-
out and we shook hands with the
big Dutchman. We sat there on
the bench between Lou and Jimmy
Foxx and chatted for a momergt or
two.
It wasn't much. Lou didn't give us
his glove as a souvenir or anything
like that. But he gave us more in
those few minutes than just being
able to say we had talked to him.
He was a great guy. And baseball will
continue to be a great game as long as
there are men like him connected
with it.
This Year's All-Stars .. .
A little more than a month from
now, the best baseball players in both
major leagues will get together at
Detroit to take part in another All-
Star game. If the American League
selectors use the same old method,
there will be a bunch of past greats
in the lineup, some of whom have
done little or nothing this year to
merit their posts.
Based on this year's performance
only, how's this for an all-star squad?
Lewis, Senators, third base
Gordon, Yankees, second base
J. DiMaggio, Yankees, center field
Williams, Red Sox, left field
York, Tigers, first base
Campbell, Tigers, right field
Cronin, Red Sox, shortstop
Dickey, Yankees, catcher
Feller, Indians, pitcher
These lads might make an error or
two but it's our guess that by the
time the game was over, they'd have
scored so many runs that the National
League outfit would be just playing

along for the practice. To follow Fel-
ler on the mound, you could take
your choice of these five: Ted Lyons
and Thornton Lee, White Sox; Earl
Johnson, Red Sox; Al Benton, Tigers;
and Steve Sundra, Senators.

(Continued from Page 1)
tion made up of Jack Albright at
shortstop and Al McBroom at sec-
ond base. Albright is a flashy fielder
and hit for a .288 average during
the Bears' regular season. McBroom
is a sophomore who earned the start-
ing pivot post as a result of his fine
play in early season.
At third base for the visitors will
MICHIGAN BATTING
AVERAGES
* * *
AB; R H Pet.
Wakefield .....106 23 39 .368
Chamberlain .. 124 27 43 .347
Veigel... ...... 6 0 2 .333
Harms .......106 18 35 .327
Ruehle.........93 20 30 .323
Nelson........121 30 37 .306
Holman ....'...113 22 34 .301
Christenson ... 56 18 16 .286
Steppon ........60 15 17 .283
Jessop....... ..4 1 1 .250
Cartmill .......29 7 7 .241
Sofiak ........ 113 20 25 .221
Muir' ..........23 0 5 .217
Wise . ..........25 1 3 .120
Stoddard ......22 3 2 .091
Gould ........ 13 4 1 .077
Pagel,....... 3 0 0 .000
Goldsmith ... 1 0 0 .000
Sharemet ....... 1 0 0 .000
Totals........ 1019 209 297 .291
Mdhigan Golf
Squad Enters
Big Ten Meet

,.

be Co-captain Stan Glriffith, an ex-
cellent fielder who boasts a commend-,
able .309 batting average.
In the outfield, Evans will start Stu
Lewis in left, Harold Cates at center-
field and Ray Amling in right.
Amling, who has already been chos-
en by his teammates to captain the
1942 team, is a long-ball hitter and
connected for an average of exactly
.300 during the regular campaign.
His fielding literally left nothing to
be desired since the big junior didn't
make a single error.
Neither Lewis nor Cates can be
classed as a particularly heavy hitter
since their averages were .240 and .285
respectively, but both are known to
be dangerous at the plate when the
Bears need runs badly.
The two teams will meet here again
tomorrow afternoon in the game that
will mark the end of the 1941 season
for the Wolverines. The Bears, how-
ever, will then continue on to East
Lansing to meet Michigan State in
a pair of games and will put the lid
on their season with two contests
against Western State Teachers' Col-
lege.
TTIlE INEoT UPS:

Frosh Tennis
Awards Given
To 1 Netters
Coach Leroy Weir climaxed a suc-
cessful Michigan tennis season by
announcing the 1944 freshman nu-
meral winners yesterday. Eleven'
first year men were named by Weir.
Leading the Frosh squad was Paul
VanWert, of Emporium, Pa. Two of
the men are not registered in the
class of '44: Sam Bloom, of Reading,
Pa., is a sophomore and Hugh Dins-
more, of Bay City, is in the class of
'42.
The eleven winners were: Bloom;
Phil deYoung, Valley Stream, N. Y.;
Dinsmore; Russ Faber, Evanston,
Ill.; Martin Feferman, South Bend,
Ind.; Doug Hillman, Grand Rapids;"
Bob Mathews, Ann Arbor; Ed Scott,
Ann Arbor; Louis Telbizoff, Monroe;
VanWert; Fred Wellington, Ann
Arbor.

By BENNETT YANOWITZ
In a game in which both teams ex-
hibited a fine caliber of play, Sigma
Phi Epsilon defeated Lambda Chi
Alpha, 8-0, yesterday afternoon at
'Wines Field to win the I-M softball
title in the fraternity division.
The game lasted seven innings but
it might just as well have ended after
the second inning, for John Micku-
lich had already clinched the game
E for the Sig Eps. The champions
'started their scoring in the first in-
! ning when Mickulich hit his first
home run of the day, this one with
the bases empty. Al Pfaller followed
with a two base hit, stole third, and
scored on an infield out to give the
Sig Eps their second run of the in-I
ning.
In the second inning, three singles
' and an error netted the Sig Phi Ep-
silon team one run and loaded the
bases, and that was the setting when
Mikulich hit his second four-bagger'
of the day to make the score 7-0.

The winners added their last run in
the fourth frame on a triple and an
infield out.
Max Rafelson, star pitcher for the
Sig Eps, never permitted a man to
reach scoring position, keeping the
Lambda Chis' three singles well
scattered.
Another "championship" was de-
cided yesterday as Chief Resident
Advisor Charles H. Peake garnered
three hits and crossed the plate three
times to lead a Resident Hall Staff
team to a 1 -9 triumph over Williams-
House in the third and decisive game
of their challenge series.
Tigers Defeat Yankees
DETROIT, June 3.-(I)-The Tig-
ers landed on Steve Peek for all their
runs in the first inning today and de-
feated the New York Yankees, 4 to
2, although they were held to four
hits over the last seven frames. Joe
DiMaggio hit a homer for the Yanks.

Sig Phi Eps Defeat Lambda Chi,
8-0, To CaptureSoftball Crown

Young Phillie
PitcherH urls
One-Hit Game
PHILADELPHIA, June 3. --(P)-
Twenty-one-year-old Tommy Hughes
gave Chicago only- one hit--a single
by Lou Novikoff in the eighth inning
-today as the Phillies shut out the
Cubs, 7-0.
Hughes pitched flawless ball against
the Cubs for seven innings, facing
just 21 men. In the eighth, he gave
up two walks-his first and last of
the game-besides Novikoff's single,
but a hidden b ll play worked by
shortstop Boby Bragan prevented
Chicago from getting a man on third
base. Hughes fanned six, got two
hits and drove in a run.
The .Phils hopped on Bill Lee in
the first for a pair of runs on Mer-
rill May's single, Nick Etten's double
and Danny Litwhiler's single. They
added three more in the second.

California
Albright,3ss
,Griffith, 3b
Cates, cf
Hoberg, c
Amling, rf
McBroom, 2b
Lewis, If
McBroom, 2b
Koll. p

Michigan
Sofiak, ss
Holman, lb
Steppon, 2b
Wakefield, rf
Chamberlain, 3b
Ruehle, lb
Cartmill e
Harms, c
Wise, p

By DON MELA
Two big jobs are confronting the
varsity golf team this week. The
first is to prepare for the all-impor-
tant final examinations. The second
is the task of rounding into top form
for the Western Conference meet,
which will take place June 18th and
19th at the Mill Road Golf Course,
north of Evanston, Illinois.
,Squad Has Fair Chance
If the team is able to get down to
practice enough in the interval be-
tween now and the Big Ten meet, it
should have a fair chance to annex
the team title at Mill Road. Illinois
is favored, on the strength of its
showing this season, to retain the
championship which they took last
year. In a dual meet with Michigan
this spring, the Illinois squad romped
off with a 231/2 to 121/2 victory. Be-
sides the Illini, Wisconsin and Iowa,
two schools which Michigan did not
play during the dual meet season
are expected to provide the stiffest
opposition. However, if the Wolver-
ines flash the brand of golf they are
capable of, they can make the meet
Ivery close.
Sophomore Ben Smith represents
Michigan's bid for the individual
title this year. The biggest obstacles
in Ben's way are Welch of Illinois,
who outstroked the lanky Wolverine
in their only meeting this year,
Homstrom of Illinois, and Captain
Gilbert of Ohio State, who Smith
has beaten twice this spring.
Best Team Score Wins
Five men will represent each school
at the meet, each man playing 72
holes. The total of the best four
men is the team score. Last year
Illinois won the meet with 1245 to
Michigan's 1254.
The course where the meet will be
held is somewhat more difficult than
the University Course, having more
woods and longer and narrower fair-
ways. Coach Courtright has been
having the team drill on the short
game, however, since the boys have
needed practice with their irons.
Dodgers Back In Lead
BROOKLYN, June 3.-(IP)-The
Brooklyn Dodgers moved back into a
tie with St. Louis for first place in
the National League today by crush-
ing the Cardinals, 6 to 0, on the six-
hit hurling of Whitlow Wyatt and
home runs by Dolph Camilli and
Pete Reiser. It was Wyatt's ninth
triumph of the season.

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to South University

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Progress

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Right Dresses
JOAN MILLER DRESSES
$2.95 up
SPORTSWEAR by Roberts
$5.95 up
Berkshire HOSIERY
69c up
SLACKS and PILAYTOGS
JUNE GRE Y
Shop
1113 S. University

During the past few years the South University
Shopping District has become more and more
prominent, serving a large group of students,
residents of the Washtenaw District, with
complete satisfaction.
Students and townspeople find their shop-
ping needs can be largely met in this compact,
conveniently located shopping area.
HATS OFF to a progressive shopping district!

LOOK
YOUR BEST
You can do this if you have your
hair cut and shampooed at Lir-
ette's. Modern, sanitary equip-
ment.
I R E TIES
Btrber Shop
1308 south University

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...
j4_,, , ;

-
MIEASURE1) VALUE
IN EXCEPTIONAL QUAITY
CLEANING
Measure this cleaning by any standard and you'll find
{ you get more for your money - much more. Here's
cleaning that digs deep for dirt - but does it so
-~~ gently. Clothes stay clean longer - last longer -
look nicer and newer.
GREENE'S
1209-A South University Phone 8633

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Drugs and undries
PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
SODAS - SUNDAES - MALTEDS
Home Cooked Plate Lunches
Our Specialty

I

WE DELIVER
CARLSON'S Pharmacy

1

1r ,7

1112 5. University

Phone 5533

Stein &Ct7

The seusation you re-
ceive the moment you
slip into, a Coolile.is
as though a cool, re-
freshing breeze Was
caressing your hody.
It's the use of specially
loomed fabrics, pls
Stein B loch's exclusive
gossamer construction
...,All of this is yours
for only .
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EAT L UNCH
where the gang mreets
Our large regular clientele of luncheon customers is
the best evidence you could want that we serve con-
sistently delicious meals, and the reasonable prices
are a boon for low budgets.
«T'. ip, a i-n l -i hm en Is,

.. .. r... .. .,. .,. . .... '

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Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Whether you like to wait on yourself at your
leisure - or have us serve you with prompt,
accurate attention - you, will find our store
exactly to your liking. No order is too small to
be treated with the most careful consideration
and courteous service. We think you will enjoy
making our grocery store your food shopping

Cleveland .......
Chicago........
New York ........
Boston .,.........
Philadelphia .,.. .
Detroit... . ..... .
Washington ...,..

W
30
26
25
22
23
24
16

L
19
18
21
19
21
23
29

Pct.
.612
.591
.543
.537
.523
.511.
.356
1Fyn

GB
1'/a
3%
4
41/
5
12
01/r

St. Louis ........ .
Brooklyn .......
New York .....
Cincinnati .... . .
Chicago .. ..... . .
Pittsburgh..... .
Boston .........

W
32
32
22
21
19
15
14
,e

L
13
13
19
25
23
22
25

Pet.
.711
.711
.536
.457
.452
.404
.359
*1 Q

GB
9
11/2
11%/2
13
15

4

iii

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