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May 07, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

PAc*E THREE

Wolverines

Wallop

Michigan

Normal

On

et

Field,

8-3

-= >

V --

SPORTFOLIO
0 Reaching For The Sun
® Future Sports Policy
By HAL WILSON
Daily Sports Editor
fHhRE'S a motion picture currently
showing in Ann, Arbor called er, goes our sincere appreciation for
"Reaching for the Sun." In our own his willingness to teach and help at
small way we have been doing that all times, and most of all for his
very thing for two and a half years. acute sense of fairness and justice.
- and Monday afternoon we finally OUR FUTURE POLICY will be dic-
grabbed it. tated almost solely by what the
It seems a long time ago since our reader desires. Several minor
initial venture into this Student Pub- changes are already under way.
lications building, since we first fal- Major league baseball scores, stand-
teringly asked for the sports editor. ings, and other pertinent facts will
And it is a long time - not in calen- receive prominent Daily mention.
dar weeks and months, perhaps, but Intramural sports, which are vital
in terms of the best experiences, the to student welfare, will receive ade-
rich friendships, and the invaluable quate play,
associations we have enjoyed. A

Reliable Ruehle ..

r
t
s
i

Like most Daily men, we can
truthfully state that working up
here has been our true education.
Classroom instruction and textbook
education have always occupied a
secondary role in our scheme of
values. We are advancing no claim
that this is the proper perspective
to take. Quite possibly it is one-
sided and out of balance. But not
once have we ever regretted the
decision to follow such a course of
action in our University career.
FIRST COLUMNS are almost al-
ways a complex jumble of emo-
tions. A flood of memories of past
failures and successes, of temporary
set-backs and minor discouragements
and encouragements serve to temper
the present glow of happiness and
sense of jubilation afforded by the
realization of two and a half years
of effort and strain. And mixed in,
too, is the vital question of future
policy.
That first meeting of sports try-
outs almost three years ago still
stands brightly in our memory. There
were a host of strange faces, faces
which later carie to be associated
with names such as Gene Gribbroek,
Woody Block, Art Hill. And there was
Norm Miller, also, about to begin his
test period of night editing as a soph-
omore. All have contributed heavily
and well to The Daily.
Gene will graduate in another
month and has been offered two
positions, one on a Rochester news-
paper, the other in Uncle Sam's
Army. Every one of the other three
was just as well qualified and could
have done just as good, if not bet-9
ter job; than we will. They just
didn't get the break.
As assistant sports editor, however,
Hill will continue to add his vast
sports knowledge to The Daily, while
Hoe Seltzer, who held a night editor-
ship during a large part of the past
year, will also contribute. his keen
sense of humor and sparkling copy
for another year.
To our predecessor, Don Wirtchaft-
Caps, Gowns & Hoods
For FACULTY and GRADUATES
Complete Rental and Sales Service
Call and inspect the nation-
ally advertised line of The
C. E. Ward e Company, New
London, Ohio.
All rental items thoroughly
sterilized before each 'time
used, complete satisfaction
guaranteed. Get our Rental ..
Rates and Selling Prices.-
VAN BOVEN, Inc.
Phone 8911 Nickels Arcade

A Tuner, more whole-hearted co-
operation with the coaching staff and
athletic department is of the utmost
importance and ranks as one of our
primary aims. Above all, we will try
to be as fair as is humanly possible,
and to please as many readers as pos-
sible. That will be another sun to
reach for.
* * *
The white space in the column head
above was scheduled to be filled by
a picture, but by press time at 2:15
a.m. the engraver had not shown up.
You can use the space for doodling.'
Golfers Work
At Short Game
To Hit Stride

Rally In Third
ining Results
In Five Tallies
Stoddard Baffles Hurons
In Early Frames;- Muir
Leads Varsity Batsmen
(Continued from Page 1)
tossed a wild throw over Ruehle's
head.
Lady Luck continued to look the
other way as far as Michigan was
concerned, as Joe Borovich, Hurons'
left fielder, hit a Texas leaguer to
center field on which Drusbacky
crossed home plate for Normal's first
run. Oxley reached first base and
Borovich second when he scratched
a hit off Muir's glove. Pat Heffnernan
got the first clean hit of the inning
when he socked a single over second
on which Borovich scored and Oxley
reached third base. Oxley came home'
for Normal's third and final run of
the game when John Shada forced
Heffernan at second, making it two
away. Joe Grady ended the inning by
grounding out.
Neil Muir continued to make him-
self a hitting pitcher by collecting
a triple, single and walk in three
trips to the plate. In the eighth inn-
ing his extra base knock sent Hol-
man home, The Wolverines chipped
off a run in the sixth inning on
Christenson's triple and an infield out
by Nelson.
The varsity got their only other
run of the game in the seventh with-
out the aid of a hit. Mike Sofiak
walked, took second when Wakefield
grounded out, went to third on a
passed ball and scored when Cham-
berlain flied deep to center field.
This is the first game since the
season's opener that Michigan's slug-
ging catcher, George Harms, hasn't
connected for a safe hit. The little
back stopper is the leading hitter of
the Big Ten with an astounding bat-
ting average of .611.
The Jinx Stopped

George Ruehle is considered one
of the best fielding first sackers in
the Conference. The lanky first
baseman helped himself to a single
and triple in yesterday's game.
Netters Await
Wildcat Mat*
Wolverines given Rest As
Rain Curtails Practice
Those fast stepping Wolverine get-
ters got a much deserved rest yes-
terday when rain made the courts

Trackmen To Face Buckeyes
In Season's Outstanding Meet

By BOB STAHL
Michigan track fans will be treated
to one of the best dual meets in the
nation Saturday, when the Wolverine
thinclad aggregation plays host to the
powerful cinder squad from Ohio
State.
The Michigan crew trounced the
strongest track team that Notre Dame
has ever been able to put together
last Saturday, while the Buckeyes
were defeating Indiana, Conference
indoor champion, and Purdue in a
triangular meet.
Saturday's dual meet with Ohio
St'ate promises to be a series of in-
dividual tests. Michigan's star half-
miler, Warren Breidenbach, will be
pitted against the Buckeye's ace, Les
Eisenhart, in the 880 and will have his
hands full in order to win. Wolverine
Coach Ken Doherty did not use
Breidenbach in the half-mile race
against the Irish last Saturday, pre-
ferring to have him run in the, 440
and the mile relay, but has indicated
that he will place Breidenbach in his
favorite distance against Eisenhart.
From all indications, the sprints
also should see very close finishes.
Al Piel and Al Thomas of Michigan,
and Ralph Hammond and Bob Wright
of Ohio State, have run the 100 yard
In The
MAJOR
LEAGUE,S
Tigers Win Again
DETROIT, May 6. -(A)- Hank
Greenberg and Bruce Campbell each
hit two home runs today to help the
Detroit Tigers complete a sweep of
their three-game series against the
New York Yankees with a 7 to 4 vic-
tory.
New York ...000 100 300-4 5 1
Detroit....,.023 000 11x-7 11 1
Bonham, Donald and Dickey; Gor-
sica and Tebbetts.
.1' * :(

Annual Spring
Grid Game Set
For Saturday

dashin almost identical times in
preceding meets this year. From last
Saturday's results, Piel should be the
man to beat in tue century; his time
of 9.8 seconds against Notre Dame
was one tenth of a second better than
the winning time turned in by the
Buckeyes against Indiana aAd Pur-
due.
Capt. Don Canham, the Wolver-
ine's great high-jumping star, will
be trying for a new Ferry Field rec-
ord of 6 ft., 6 in. in Saturday's meet.

By LYONS HOWLAND too soggy for play.
Coach Ray Courtright's varsity , Coach Leroy Weir had intended to
golfers are .hard1 at work on their have a lengthy session with his team
short game this week after suffering in preparation for the Northwestern
a 14 to 13 heartbreaking loss to Notre match tomorrow, but decided to give
Dame at South Bend Monday.
The linksmen are a little bit on the racqueteers a one day respite.
the gloomy side as they work out Every member of the squad is anx-
on University Golf Course. By a close iously awaiting the Wildcat battle
shave the Wolverines just missed ty- because it will provide a definite test
ing or beating the Irish on the South
Bend course. "Each man that played as to the strength of the team. The
seems to feel himself individually Wolverines have had tough matches,
responsible for the loss," Coach but none have been against opponents
Courtright said. "However," he con- of Northwestern's calibre.
tinued, "no one man was the cause At the top of the roster of last
of our defeat, and this feeling shows I year's Conference champions is Sey-
the sincerity and team cooperation mour Greenberg, 140 pound junior,
that the squad has had this year. who walked off with the number one
The match was not decided till the bracket title in straight sets last year.
last putt on the .last green of the4 This slim, wiry, young man of 20
last match, and ironically, it had yearsis ranked high among the ama-I
to be here that three Notre Dame men teurs of the nation and will prove
came through with birdies to edge out hard to beat,
the Wolverines. Johnny Barr, Dave Weir extects to put his charges
Osler, and Johnny Leidy were the Wi xtcst u i hre
shre and ohnnyth eidyern the through a long workout today to iron
three to lose their matches on the
Notre Dame birdies, out some of the faults that were no-
Other little slip-ups on the part ticeable in Monday's match with Pur-
of Wolverine players, because of the due. The Wolverines won quite hand-
evenly matched strength of the teams, ily but seemed to be having a little
turned out to bear more weight than trouble with their net play.
they expected. The Wolverines did Today's practice will also help Weir
not get much of a chance to go over decide who will play in the second
the Notre Dame course on practice doubles spot with Tom Gamon.
rounds before the match, and this
may have been a factor in their de-
feat. Familiarity with a course plays Intram ural
a big part in the final score, this
being especially true when a match o
is scored on a best ball basis. Had
the match been on the University
Course, the score might have been!Results
another story.
Big weakness of the Wolverine team
was in the short game department. Softball continued to be the center
Putting and approach shots caused of activity in Intramural competition
a good share of the trouble. .,,ih. + cfrm,3. f t A,-.,.

i

DON CANHAM
This will be, the Michigan senior's
last chance at this record and from
the heights he has reached the past
several weeks, it is not at all unlikely
that he will leave a new mark for
his successors to shoot at. JumpingI
from what was virtually a dip in the
ground last Saturday. caused by the
wet mud in the pit at Notre Dame,
Canham turned in a leap of over
6 ft., 3 in., and has already jumped
over 6 ft., 5 in., in practice sessions.
Major League Standings

Crisler Selects Two Teams,
'Blues' And 'Whites'
For Stadium Tilt
By BUD HENDEL
Michigan football fans will receive
their first chance to see head coach
Fritz Crisler's 1941 edtition of the
Wclzerine grid juggernaut Saturday
at 2:30 p.m., when Crisler will unveil
his team on the green Stadium turf
t the annual srping intrasquad
game. Admission will be free.
Award To Be Made
Saturday will also mark the an-
nouncement of the winner of the
annual University of Michigan Club
Chicago Award. The recipient of
this award is chosen by the coaching
staff on the basis of a number of
considerations, with improvement
during spring training being the pri-
mary factor. Also entering into the
selection are attendance, attitude, and
potential varsity ability. Last year
the trophy was awarded to quarter-
back George Ceithaml.
Further festivities of the football
nature will take place Saturday when
the annual High School Coaches'
Clinic, conducted by the Michigan
Athletic Department, convenes. At-
tepdance is expected to pass the 2,500
mark, with about 150 mentors and
their grid pupils being counted upon
to put in an appearance.
Harmon In Exhibition
In a special exhibition, Tom Har-
mon, famous Wolverine All-American
halfback for the past three years,
will demonstrate passing and kicking
for the benefit of the high school
tutors in Yost Field House. ,
When the whistle blows at the end
of Saturday's intrasquad tilt, the
current spring training session will
have drawn to a close. The team has,
been practicing for six weeks now,
and has shown much progress-al-
though the end, halfback, and re-
[ serve situations are still critical.
Crisler has divided the squad in-
to two evenly matched teams for
the battle, the Blues and the Whites.
For the rest of this week the two
clubs will work on perfecting plays:
in preparation for the approaching
tilt. The game promises to be a de-
ceptive, high-scoring contest.
Yesterday Crisler drove his charges
through a lively scrimmage, using
both the passing and running at-
tacks. Halfbacks Don Robinson,
Johnny Allerdice and Bob Morrison:
all showed plenty of pigskin-flipping
ability, while ends Joe Rogers, Don
Long and Walt Freihofer flashed'
lots of pass-snagging skill.
White Features Drill
The feature of the day was pro-
vided by Paul White, big freshman
halfback, when he galloped 70 yards
around left end for a touchdown.
Don Boor, yearling fullback, also
ribped off several long runs.
Injuries are plentiful in the Wol-
verine camp. Center Ted kennedy,
guards Harry Anderson and Hoe
Seltzer, halfback Ray Sowers, quar-
terback Joe Josephs, and ends Otto
Chady and Riudy Smeja are all in-
capacitated.

Michigan AB
Nelson, cf .. 3
Cartmill, cf . . 1
Holman, if .. 4
Sofiak, ss .... 4
Wakefield, rf 4
Chamb'l'n, 3b 4
Ruehle, lb .. 3
Christ'son, 2b 4
Harms, c .... 3
Stoddard, p .. 0
Muir, p .... 2
Pagel" . . . . 1

RI
0
0
1
2
1
1
1
0
0
0

H
0
0
1
2
2
2
0
0
2
0

O
2
0
0
3
1
0
11
3
7
0
0
0

A
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
3
0l
11
41
01

I

Totals .... 33

8 10 27 11I

Senators Triumph, 5-3
CLEVELAND, May 6.-(/P)-The
Cleveland Indians' victory streak was
snapped at 11 games today by the
Washington Senators.
Washington .200 000 021-5 8 1
Cleveland ...000 002 010-3 10 1.
Leonard and Ferrell; Bagby, He-
ving and Hemsley.
Giants Defeat Cubs
NEW YORK, May 6.-(A)-The
New York Giants spotted the Cubs
three runs in the first inning and
then came from behind to win 5 to 3.
Chicago .....00 000 000-3 4 1
New York ...013 000 10x-5 13 0
Passeau and McCullough; Hubbell
and Danning.
Pittsburgh Loses, 7-3
BROOKLYN, May 6.-(P)-Billy
Herman, former Chicago second
baseman playing his first game for
Brooklyn, had a perfect day at the
plate today with three singles, a
double and a walk in the Dodgers'
7 to 3 victory over Pittsburgh.

'r W L
Cleveland . ....16 5
Detroit ..........11 8
Chicago.........10 8
New York .......1.2 10
Boston ...........9 8
Washington 7 13
Philadelphia .... 6 12
St. Louis .........4 11

Pet.
.762
.579
.556
.545
.529
.350
.333
.267

d

t

AMERICAN LEAGUE

GB
4
41/2
5
81/
81/2
9

*Batted for Stoddard in the 3rd.

M. Normal AB
Siera, c .... 4
Newlands, cf . 2
Gretzner, cf 2
Drusbacky, 2b 4
Borovich, lb 3
Oxley, if .... 4
Heffernan, rf 3
Shada, ss .. 3
Grady, 3b .. 3
Dennis, p .... 3
Neemith ** .. 1
Wojcicki ** . 1
Totals ......33

R
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0

II
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

" (0
7
0
2
3
8
1
1
1
1
0
0
0

AI
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
3
1
1
0
0

Wednesday's Games
Washington at Detroit
Philadelphia at St. Louis
New York at Cleveland

*

*

0NATIONAL LEAGUE

W L
St. Louis ........15 4
Brooklyn....,....16 6
New York........10 8
Cincinnati ........8 11
Boston ...........8 11
Pittsburgh ........6 11
Philadelphia......7 13
Chicago .......... 5 11

Pct.
.789
.727
.556
.421
.421
.353
.350
.313

GB
%/
4%/
7
7
8
8'2
8%'

3 5 24 7

Pittsburgh . .110 001 000-3
Brooklyn .. . .200 100 40x-7
Sewell, Wilkie and Lopez;
and Owen.

11 2
10 0
Wyatt1

*Batted for Borovich in the
**e*Batted for Heffernan in

9th.
the 9th.1

/

FRESHMEN,
If You're In a Rut
DON'T READ' THIS
But, if you are the kind of fellow who
wants to be in one of the top activities at
Michigan . .. if you want sound training
in business and advertising-well, Brother,
you're the Man we want on the Michigan
Daily business staff.
Be sure to attend the staff meeting on
Monday, May 12, at 5 P.M.

with beamsI romL ne raern ly, oU-
mitory, and independent divisions
seeing action.
Williams House, leader in the dorm
division, gave warning that they will
be hard to stop by defeating Michi-
gan House, 13-2, for their second
straight win. They may expect a
fight, however, from the Lloyd House
team that walloped Adams House,
17-0, behind the four-hit pitching of
Jim Hull. Other results in this divi-
sion were Winchell 15, Chicago 14;
Prescott 3, Fletcher 2; Greene 8, Tyl-
er 1; Allen Rumsey 14, Wenley 8.
In the fraternity games Chi Psi
defeated Kappa Sigma, 18-9; Pi
Lambda Phi edgeQ Phi Epsilon Pi,
7-6; Chi Phi walloped Alpha Sigma
Phi, 19-2; Phi Kappa Sigma defeat-
ed Sigma Phi, 14-9; Kappa Nu beat
out Acacia, 12-9; and Bill Burke
sparked the Sigma Chi team to a
7-4 victory over Sigma Alpha Mu.

Mich. Normal 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0-3
Michigan 0 0 5 0 0 1 1 1 x-6
Errors: Christienson, Chamberlain,
Oxley. Three base hits: Wakefield,
Ruehle, Christiensen, Muir. Sacrifice:
Holman. -Double plays: Shada and
Drusbacky; Muir, Christienson and
Ruehle. Left on bases: Mich. Normal
-3, Michigan-7. Passed ball: Siera.
Wild pitch: Dennis. Bases on balls
off: Dennis, 6; Struck out by: Muir,
6; Dennis, 7. Umpires: Vick, Andrews.
Hank To Go On Schedule
DETROIT, May 6. -(A)- Hank
Greenberg, Detroit Tiger outfielder
whose induction into the army was
deferred today from Wednesday until
Thursday, said he would report for
military duty on schedule.
At the conclusion of today's game
between the Tigers and Yankees,
Greenberg said he would report to the
induction center tomorrow as origi-
nally planned and would not partici-
pate in raising of the American
Leauge pennant at Briggs Stadium.

* * *
Cards Drop One, 5-4
BOSTON, May 6.-(P)-The St.
Louis Cardinals' winning streak was
snapped at 10 straight today when
the Boston Braves hopped on Johnny
Grodzicki for five runs in the fifth
inning to come from behind and
triumph, 5 to 4.
St. Louis ....200 000 020-4 11 3
Boston ......000 050 00x-5 6 2
Grodzicki, Nahem, Lanier, Krist
and Mancuso; Ferrell, Sullivan, La-
menna and Berres, Masi.
Vander Meer Beaten, 4-2
PHILADELPHIA, May 6.-R/)-
Johnny Vander Meer struck out 11
men but lost a pitching duel to vet-
eran Cy Blanton today as the Phil-
lies won 4 to 2.

Wednesday's Games
Chicago at Philadelphia
Pittsburgh at Boston
St. Louis at Brooklyn
Cincinnati at New York

'M' CLUB NOTICE
There will be a meeting of all
"M" Club members tomorrow at
8 p.m. All new letter winners are
,expected to be present.
Gus Sharemet, President
LOOK YOUR BEST
Be particular,
individualistic-suave!
Try a "crew" or '"personality"
hair style with a scalp-treatment
at our hospital-like shop. Ton-
sorial queries invited.

re, 16 n

71. rr n,1. + +htl7s

9.

Cincinnati. -010 000 100-2 5 0s r
Philadelphia 020 001 01x-4 6 0 Kep 4-Head of Your Hair
Vander Meer and Lombardi; Blan- Liberty off State
ton and Warren.
MDON'T FORGEsT 1O T IE ON 9
Mother s Dciy

AFTER THE CONCERT or MOVIE -
ya MARS HALL'S
£ -.~~mg _ l -L

Let us help you select a LASTING gift!

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