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April 06, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-06

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 6, 1941

. ..... ......... . . .......... ...

Booth, Skit Entries Due Tuesday

The Thetas are going to Can-Can
for you!
The Phi Gammas are concocting a
good "old-time" medicine show, the
Sigma Chi barber shop quartet is
already practicing and the Alpha
Gamma Detla girls are rehearsing
their "Fannies Return" show . .. all
this in preparation for the 1941
Spring Festival, Michilodeon, to be
held May 2 and 3 in Waterman and
Barbour gymnasiums.
Booth and Skit entries for Michi-
lgdeon, promised to be the biggest
five-cent carnival ever presented on
campus, will be accepted until next
Tuesday, according to Bob Shedd and
Bill Slocum of the Union junior staff.
With some 30 booths already plan-
nied and 20 skits already entered, this

year's festival is supposed to have
everything from Talley Rand's (cor-
rect) Dude Ranch to an Aquacade.
Other planned entries include
Theta Chi's bar, a la Hitler's "Lau-
enbrau": Theta Delta Chi's brass
band and the Pi Phi elecutionists. .
Any dormitory, fraternity, soror-
ity or other campus group may enter
skits or booths, sponsors said. The
festival will make a two night stand
with dancing on both nights, accord-
ing to Charles Heinen, '44E, general
chairman. Sponsored jointly by the
Union and the Women's Athletic As-
sociation, funds from Michilodeon
will go toward the building of the
long-sought-for women's swimming
pool.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING]

TYPING'
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
TYPIST-Experienced. L. M. Hey-
wood, 414 Maynard St. Phone 5689.
27c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
RIDE HOME in one sof our trans-
portation bargains. With a car
full, expenses are much less than
buying a ticket. Come to Cushing
Motor Sales, 400 W. Washington,
Telephone 5640. 332
HEATING and PLUMBING
PLUMBING & HEATING-Let Sam
C. Andres make your needed re-
pairs over the holidays. Phone
7102. 30C
LOST and FOUND
BLACK ZIPPER KEY CASE with
Stockwell dormitory keys and
stamps. Call Louise Engell, 2-4471.
333

MISCELLANEOUS

THESIS BINDING--Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
TAILORED suits and coats, custom
made. Day time, evening gowns
made and remodeled. Phone 3468.
24c
STOCKWELL residents - Skilled al-
terations promptly done. Just
across the street. Phone.2-2678.
A. Graves. 28c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices 3e

[ate Hungarian
Leader Known
As Geographer
Count Paul Teleki - former prem-
ier of Nazi dominated Hungary who
died last Thursday t was by per-
sonal inclination a scholar in geo-
graphy rather than a political lead-
er, Professor Emertius William H.
Hobbs of the geology department,
a personal friend, relates.
"The Count, chief of one of Hun-
gary's great landed families, follow-
ed politics more because of family
tradition than individual interest,
Hobbs explained, for he was an able
scholar in geography." However,
the governing class of Hungary-like
that of England and other iEuropean
countries-have come from leading
families for centuries, and so the
Count was naturally drawn into the
political life of his country."
Professor Hobbs first met the de-
ceased Hungarian premier in Decem-
ber, 1912. when the professor lee-
tured in Budapest before the Hun-
garian Geographical Society. Count
Teleki was president of the Society
and he and the Countess acted as
hosts to Hobbs and his wife. They
were treated to a week of dinners,
Hobbs relates, among them an eve-
ning at the famed Lando-casino in
Budapest-the most famed night-
spot in the Hungarian capital.
Since then he and the Count have
continued to correspond with each
other, Hobbs said, the last letter
from the late premier having arrived
about three years ago.
During the first World War the
Count served on a group in charge
of correlating the war activities of
Austria and Hungary, then .Joined
as the Austro-Hungarian empire,
Hobbs related. "However, in this war,
the Count has been personally known
as pro-British rather than pro-Nazi,
but has sought to maintain the ap-
pearance of neutrality to make his
influence the greater on the Ger-
mans," he stated.
Speech Survey
,Will Be Made
Seven Members Of Clinic
Plan Three-Day Study
Seven members of the Speech Clin-
ic, will leave today to make a sur-
vey of school children of Petoskey,
Michigan.
The medical, dental, and speech
examination and diagnosis will be the
largest made this year under the
auspices of the Speech Clinic.
Those participating in the three-
day study will be Prof. Harlan H.
Bloomer of the speech department,
the director of the Speech Clinic,
Dr. Dell Henry, John Clancy, Wil-
liam Bilto, Fred Densmore, Ruth
Watt, Grad., and Dr. W. W. Held of
I the dental school.

State Teachers
Plan To Gather
HereApril 24
Dean Edmonson To Serve
As Chairman' Of Panel
At Educators' Meeting1
Twelfth Annual Conference on
Teacher Education and the Seventh
Annual Conference on Problems of
School and College Cooperation will
be held here April 24 for superin-
tendents and educators, it was an-
nounced yesterday.
Under the auspices of the Schoolj
of Education, the teacher education
meeting will consider problems of
training, teaching- materials and se-
lection of candidates for positions,
Dean James B. Edmonson will act
as chairman of the panel meeting at
10 a.m" Dr. Edgar Johnston will des-
cribe, "The Plans for the Teacher
Education Workshop in the Univer-
sity Summer Session". Dr. Lawrence
Vredevoogd and Prof. Raleigh Schol-
ring will speak on the topic, "What
are Some of the Best Recent Books,
Studies and Articles on the Educa-
tion of Teachers."
A panel discussion on "The Pos-
sible Advantages and Disadvantages
of the National Examinations for the
Selection of Candidates for Teaching
Positions."
Dr. H. L. Turner will act as chair-
man of the panel assisted by Dr.
Fred Frostic, Dr. 0. W. Haisley, Dr.
Chester Miller, Dr. Thomas Carter,
Dr. John R. Emens and Prof Arthur
Moehlman of the education school.
Dean Wells L. Bennett of the Col-
lege of Architecture and Design will
act as chairman of the luncheon
meeting of the cooperation confer-
ence, which will hear Dr. Willard 0.
Mauck, president of Hillsdale Col-
lege discuss on "Some Probable Ef-
fects of the Defense Program on
Colleges."
At 2 p.m. the conference will hold
a roundtable on the general theme
"College Days," led by Prof, George
Carrothers.
(Political Advertisement) w

London Enters Hillel David sou To Give
Oratorical finals; Naval ROTC Talk
zeierCrohn Win----
Ze er Cr hn W tt',Capt. Lyal A. Davidson. U. S. N.
Herbert London, '43, will compete Commandant of the University's Na-
in the district finals of the National val ROTC unit, will deliver the third
Hillel Oratorical Contest in Iowa City of a series of lectures on the customs
today, and traditions of the Navy at 7 p.m.
London was the winner in the re- tomorrow in Room 348, West Engin-
I gional tourney which' saw represen- eering Building.
tatives from Hillel Foundations of This series of talks was inaugur-
Michigan State College and Michi- ated by Captain Davidson two weeks
gan State Normal College competing.
gan e Nrwin Co ege o e ago. The lectures, given every Mon-
If London wins the district title, ao h etrs ie viyMn
he will go on to enter the national day night, are designed to acquaintj
finals. Last year he reached the applicants for a commission in the
finals. Naval Reserve with the Naval Code
Debaters Irving Zeiger, '41, anda
David Crohn, '43, of the local foun- tams.
dation defeated representatives of tms
the Ohio State Foundation in a con-
test here Friday.
Zeiger and Crohn will travel to
Columbus Thursday where they will
meet debaters from the University
of Kentucky in a semi-final match W d
of the district championship.math

;,
i
;
r
i
r
r
a i

Marshall's
Meets
or
Beats
Competitive
Prices
Phone

Today at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
STARTS TODAY!
ONE HIT9
ONE RUN..! 4

V, Zym cr, I- Eil ii p ro
D i f .1 "IrA t

'Mater Colors Shown In Display
A group of water color sketches
from the interior decoration studios
of Marshall Field and Company, Chi-
cago, is being shown in the first
floor display cases of the Architec-
ture Building-

1' 'i

.1

Order a

At

Tasty Sandwich

and a

Delicious

Ma ted

at

_____ ___ Extra
lp1GTURE
I 1EOPLE

WORLD
NEWS

5933
We Deliver

Mars las

- ming Thursday -
KAY JACK
FRANCIS OAKIE
"LITTLE MEN"

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special
dent rates. Moe Laundry,
South First St., Phone 3916.

stu-
226
loc

(Political Advertisement) (Pblitical Advertisene-it°) (Political Advertisement)

r

11

WANTED TO BUY-4
WANTED-Any old or new clothing.
Pay from $5.00 to $500.00 for suits,
overcoats, typewriters, furs - Per-
sians, Minks, also old broken up
watches. PhoneAnn Arbor6304
for appointments. SAM.

I

Elect a Successful businessman

1~

JOHN JACOB NILES
SINGER O 1 AMERICAN FOLK MUSIC
in
Songs of the Southern Monntains
with D 'ulciner accompzanient

for

Amn
M. A

(OR

I

LYDIA MENDL SSOHN THEA
All seats reserved '

TkE April 8, 1941;
50 and 75 cents Tel.

8:30 P.M.
6300

---

wWilia in A:

K 0 -L AN D U

Vote Democratic and Give Ann Arbor:
1. MODERN, efficient and progressive administration.
2. FAIR AND EQUITABLE assessment of property.
3: GAS RATES comparable with low rates existing in other cities having
similar service.
4I, REPRESENTATION of ail the peple of the City.

5. COOPERATION between
for a better Ann Arbor.

business, labor,

industry and the

University

4

President of the Council
RUSSEL J. VIAL

J"Sticc of the Pcoce
JOHN W. CONLIN

City Auscssor
HOWARD V. BURR

,; ;

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f #: , ,.

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smrmak

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