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October 13, 1939 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-10-13

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13, 1939

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PsiU

Scores 33

Peckinpaugh Plays UnderDad
In First Year Of Pro Baseball

By ART HILL
There are probably not many stu-
dents on the Michigan campus who
would jump at the prospect of spend-
ing their summer vacation in Opa-
lousas, La. But Walt Peckinpaugh,
captain and third baseman of last
year's Michigan baseball squad, was
glad of the chance to do just that, be-
cause Walt went there to play third
base for the Opalousas baseball club
in the Evangeline League, known
among baseball men as the fastest
class D league in the country.
As soon as classes were finished
last June, Walt left for Nashville
where he signed a contract with the
New Orleans Pelicans of the South-
ern Association, a club managed by
his father, Roger Peckinpaugh, for-
mer chief of the Cleveland Indians.
Recalled By New Orleans
However, his dad decided that the
jump from college ball to the South-
ern Loop was a little too big for Peck
so he was sent to Opalousas, where
he stayed until shortly after Aug. 1,
when he was recalled by the Peli-
cans.
Playing nine innings of baseball
every day is a little hard to get used
to, according to the young third sack-
er even for a fellow who has been
used to working out each afternoon,
as Walt did during the college sea-
son.
The change from daylight to night
ball is also a little difficult to accus-
tom oneself to. "The lights in the
Evangeline League are pretty poor,"
says Walt. "Half the time, I found
myself standing in a shadow at
third base. And base-running is
harder because it is impossible to see
the ball in the outfield after it hits
the ground."
Night. Baseball Difficult
The greatest menace in night base-
ball is the swarms of bugs which
seem to frequent the parks and,

according to Peck, often necessitate
players ducking while running the
bases. Calling time for the express
purpose of removing gnats from a
player's eyes is not at all uncommon.
With the Pelicans, Walt was a.
team-mate of pitcher Johnny Hum-
phries and second-baseman Jim
Shilling, Cleveland rookies who will
undoubtedly be given another chance
to make the major league grade
next spring.
Peck's batting mark at New Or-
leans was only .229 but it was rising
steadily as the season ended. "When.
I first joined the team," he says, "I
got only two hits in my. first 19
dimes at bat. Then I began getting
one or two every day but I couldn't
get over the effects of that poor
Mtart." In the field, he did not make
an error until the final day of the
season.
'Mishaps In Football
Accidental'-Governor
LANSING, Oct. 12.-(PA)-Gov. Lur-
en D. Dickinson, who attended the
Michigan-Michigan State football
game last Saturday after refusing
to watch the Joe Louis-Bob Pastor
prize fight, said today several persons
had written him asking "why?"
"In a prize fight," he said, "the
intention of each fighter is to hit and
injure the other fellow. In football
no player, intends to hurt another.
Such injuries as do result are acci-
dental."
BASKETBALL NOTICE
All eligible candidates for the
Varsity basketball team report at
the I-M Building, 4:30 p.m., Mon-
day.
Bennie Oosterbaan, Coach.

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Points T4
c
PhiGaMs Hold
Second Place
Largest Entry In History
Sees Action; New Type
Of Relays Are Featured
By JOE WALKER
The Psi Upsilon track tearm rac-
tically assured itself of ultimate vic-
tory in the annual Fraternity Out-
door Track Meet, as :c rolled up
close to a record score yesterday af-
ternoon at Ferry Field.
The win is not yet official since
there .are two events, the high jump
and pole vault, which still remained
after darkness had called a halt to
the meet.
The nearest approach to Psi U's
score of 33 points was the Phi Gam-
ma Delta total of 21. The Phi Gams,
winners of last year's meet, edged
out Chi Psi by one point, but re-
sults of the remaining two events
may change that standing.
Crowd Causes Delay
The largest participation in the
history of the meet was recorded yes-
terday, with more than 300 men on
hand. It was this huge crowd that
delayed, the meet and forced the
directors to postpone the two events
and eliminate the progressive broad
jump.
Psi U placed only one man in any
of the individual. events, but left it
up to the relay team to account for
all the scoring. The ten-man squad,
composed of Ganson Taggard, Jack
Chapman, Rex Latham, Richard
Lord, Fred Heath, Reed Crammer,
Ken Marshall, Noel Pridgeon. Fred
Spaulding and David Allen, won
easily in the Shuttle and Potato Re-
lays and were narrowly shaded by a
fighting Chi Psi repesentation in
the Horse and Rider Relay.
Relays Are New
Of the three relays run, two, the
potato and horse and rider are pro-
ducts of the imagination of the In-
tramual Department and were in-
cluded in the program in an attempt
to present a more acceptable pro-
gram._
The horse and rider rela is what
its name implies: one man riding on
the back of another for 30 yards. The
potato. relay is very unusual and
calls for the placing of a wooden
cube in three rings by each partici-
pant.
Eldridge Runs Fourth
Biggest individual disappointment
of the day was Dave Eldridge's show-
nig in the 120-yard low hurdles. Dave,
running for Theta Delta Chi, t'n-
shed n6 better than fourth in the
final heat, after turning in the best
time of the afternoon in the event
by winning his heat in :137. He
made up for it later by tying Phi
Beta Delta's Norman Elson and Sig-
ma Chi's Carl Riggs for individual
scoring honors, all three boys being
on top with a first and a fourth
apiece.
Sigma Chi, which finished fourth,
the only entry to place two men in
the same individual event. Carl
Riggs and Don Siegel turned the trick
when they took first and second
places respectively in the shot put.
Tuack Surnmmfries
120-yard low hurdles-Won by Nor-
man Elson, Phi Beta Delta; second,
Jack Wolin, Phi Sigma Delta; third,
Frank McCarthy, Chi Psi; fourth,
Dave Eldridge, Theta Delta Chi.

Winning time-14 seconds.
10-yard dash-Won by Hugh Dal-
sell, Sigma Chi; second, Bill Harnist,
Alpha Tau Omega; third, Buck Daw-
son,- Phi Gamma Delta; fourth, Nor-
man Elson, Phi Beta Delta. Winning
time=-11,2 seconds.
The Potato Relay-Won by Psi
Upsilon; second, Phi Gamma Delta;
third, Phi Beta Delta; fourth, Phi
Delta Theta.
The Horse and Rider Relay-Won
by Chi Psi; second, Psi Upsilon; third,
Delta Upsilon; fourth, Phi Gamma
Delta.
The Shuttles Relay-Won by Psi
Upsilon; second, Chi Psi; third,
Theta Xi; fourth, Phi Gamma Delta.
The Discus Throw-Won by Dave
Eldridge, Theta Delta Chi; second,
John Gillis, Phi Delta Theta; third,
Al Pfaller, Sigma Phi Epsilon; fourth,
Carl Riggs, Sigma Chi.
The Shot Put-Won by Carl Riggs,
Sigma Chi; second, Don Siegel, Sigma
Chi; third, Bob Riggs, Sigma Nu;
fourth, Al Pfaller, Sigma Phi Epsilon.
Winning throw-36 ft. 3 in.
The Baseball Throw-Won by Ran-
dall Braun; Chi Phi; second, Jim
Palmer, Phi Gamma Delta; third,
Charles Ross, Phi Delta Theta;
fourth, George Ruehle, Kappa Sigma.1
The Broad Jump-Won by Noel
Pridgeon, Psi Upsilon; second, Larry
Thomas, Sigma Alpha Epsilon; third,
Joe Reed, Phi Delta Theta; fourth,
Charles James. Phi Kappa Psi.

Joe Savilla Seeks Full Year's Work

After Being Jinxed Twice By Injuries

By MASE GOULD
The fire of determination, once at
a low ebb because of repeated physi-
cal setbacks, has once again returned,
and now burns' brighter than ever
in the heart of Coach Crisler's tower-
ing, fierce-charging first string
tackle, Roland "Joe" Savilla.
Savilla, because his grid career has
been interrupted to such an extent
by the injury jinx during the past
two years, has a burning desire to
participate in every game this sea-
son, his last, and furthermore in
such a manner as to convince any
remaining skeptics that he can play
great football. And he has already
started out in an auspicious fashion.
Injury Jinx Strikes
The injury jinx began to plague
Crisler's quiet-spoken 6 foot, 3 inch,
205-pound Gallagher, W.Va. product
in his very first year on the squad.
Although only a sophomore, Savilla
figured prominently in the plans of
Harry Kipke, then in his last year as
Wolverine head coach, because of
his size and defensive potentialities.
In fact, Joe earned himself a
starting assignment. Then came
trouble. In a practice scrimmage
before the Minnesota game, which
was the' third of the season, Savilla.
suffered a -compound dislocation of
a finger, but he entered the Gopher
tussle with the digit bandaged. No
sooner had he gotten into the fray
than he was out of it again, this time
with a strained instep on his right
foot.
Splinters Cheek Bone
That was 1937, but more trouble
was on the wing. Two weeks before
last year's opener with Michigan
State, Joe was hit in the cheek by
the flying foot of one of his team-
mates, and a splintered bone was
the result. He missed the Spartan
game, but won back his tackle job
in time for Chicago, at which time
he used a specially built face guard.
All went well until the crucial
battle with Minnesota the following
week. In that game, Savilla, togeth-
er with the rest of Michigan's power-
ful forward wall, turned in a grand
job by repeatedly throwing back the
Gopher charges, but in the final
quarter in which Van Every's pinch-
passing toppled the Wolverines, 7 to
6, Joe wound up with a broken bone
in his right foot. This blow sent
him down for the count and he was
forced to wear a cast for the remain-
der of the season.
But this is another year. At the

0 Lead In terfraternity

Track

Mee

r
Q

he says, and adds rather glumly, "
about timie for me to break somebc
else's bones."
J OHN'S
TAILOR and CLEANER
Suits Made To Measure
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Also Alterations and Repairing
609 PACKARD STREET

start offpractice, Coach Crisler and
his staff were more than a little
skeptical as to whether the West Vir-
ginian's foot had completely .healed.

ing tackles and a fierce charge on
offense. In short, he was as spry as#
any man on the field.
Savilla has nothing to remind of
past injuries now save his face guard,
which he still wears as a precaution.
"It seems strange to be in good shape,

.'. 1 .
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I

JOE SAVILLA

Could it stand up in tough competi-
tion?
Joe certainly gave the final answer
to that query last Saturday with an
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