100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1939 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EIGH .~j TUE MICHIGAN DAILY Fl

MIAY,

Slosson Tells
Of Peace Plan
For All World

(Continued from Page 1)

bunal, he pointed out, is necessary,
as there can be no peace in the
world without law and no "law with-
out enforcement." This, it will be
aoted, obviates the fault that has
been found with the present League,
that it "has no teeth."
5. Plebiscites conducted by armed
representatives of -impartial "third
parties" for all changes in national
borders are called for. The Saar
election is cited as an example of
this type of plebiscite.
If this principle were applied, the
reestablishment of Poland and
Czechoslovakia would, according to
Profes, Slosson, be virtually as-
sured; but genuinely Germai dis-
tricts would remain German, and
genuinely Russian districts could be-
come Russian.
6. A reduction of armaments is
called for in this last section of the
peace plan. It goes on, moreover, to
prvide for inspections of all muni-
tions factories, shipyards, forts and
other places of military importance
by experts in the service of the League
of Nations. This, Professor Slosson
explained, would prevent not only the
preparation of secret armament but
also suspicions of such breach of
faith in the minds of other nations.
These should be the terms to be
proposed immediately by the United
States, he said. "If accepted, they
would put an end to the Second
World War. If rejected by the ag-
gressor governments," Professor Slos-
son concluded, "at least they would
avert a third World War by crown-
ing victory . . with a just and wise
and enduring peace= settlement."
WJR Will Broadcast
First Of Radio Series
The history of radio will be the
subject of the first of a series of
dramatic programs to be broadcast
3:30 p.m. today over Station WJR
The series, tentaveiy called "The
Michigan Radio Guild," is designed
to educate high school students iri
the fundamentals of broadcasting.
The script for today was written
by Leonard Schleider, '41, Norman
Schorr, '40, Jack Silcott, Grad., and
Michael Kinsella, Spec. It will be
announced by Don Chown, Grad.

Gulf Of tSl4V
BouiaTHOUSANDS QUIT YiIPRI MA 5$J nU~tl
AALAND IS " TURKUI FhVN/SHARfS RISE
1'1 )ISBEG N Al /:/A' P
kNI-
STeGRKDOW
- a
tiulfof S T OJGso
a RgaLiv' c R
___D1 t.L

.t
,

Conclusion of a pact with Lithuania gave Soviet Russia a springboard
on the Baltic, from the Gulf of Finland to the border of East Prussian.
Germany, near the port of Memel which Germany recently seized from
Lithuania. Shaded area shows the three. Baltic countries with which
Russia has completed agreements which make them, in effect, Russian
protectorates. Shaded portion extends to Wilno for an approximate
area around the ancient Lithuanian capital restored to that country. The
Russians massed ships at Kronstadt and thousands of troops along the
Baltic nations' borders. Thousands were ready to flee Helsinski and
Viipuri, the latter capital of Eastern Finland.

Classified Directory

I

_

jr

Ii LAUNDERNG9

f'

STUDENT'S SPECIAL
3 Shirts .................42
2 Sets Underwear ...........20
1 Pr. Pajamas ..............18
5 Handerkchiefs.............10
4 Pr. Socks................ 16
1 Towel................. 4
ALL foa97c
SUNSHINE LAUNDRY
Dial 6964
Free Pick Up and Delivery
ACE HAND LAUNDRY--Wants only
one trial to prove we launder our
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity.
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices.
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pit kups and deliveries"
Price List
All articles washed and ironed.
Shirts.....................14
Undershirts ...............04
Shorts.....................04
Pajama Suits ..............10
Socks, pair ............,...03
Handkerchiefs ..............02
Bath Towels.................03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coed's laun-
dries. All bundles done separately.
No markings. Silks, wools our
specialty. 9
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112.
MISCELLANEOUS -20
EMERGENCY SALE-1939 General
Electric Radio-Phonograph com-
,,ination. Used only 4 months.
$40.50 value for only $19.95 cash.
Call 3074 for Mr. Young before
Saturday afternoon.

After her divorce from Jackie Coogan, actress Betty Grable answered queries about a reported romance with
Artie Shaw, band leader, by saying "He's just a fellow I've been going out with." But she added she couldn't
wed anyway until her divorce is final a year hence. Shaw and Miss Grable are-shown dining in a Holly
wood restaurant on the eve of her; divorce.

II

AT YOUR CAMPUS
REXALL DRUG STORE
50c Prophylactic Tooth Brushes......29c
60c Calox Tooth Powder.. .......39c
100 Bayer's Aspirin .............. 59c
35c Vicks Vapo-Rub ............. 31c
50c Williams Shaving Cream......39c
75c Fitch's Shampoo .............49c
500 Rexal l Facial Tissues .........25c
40c Squibb's Tooth Paste .......... 33c
Hot Fudge Toasted Sandwich
Sundae Malted Milk
12C 22c
Camels - Chesterfields - Old Golds
Rnlaiin c-n Cuirle - nnel I i mro Crike N

New York's former Governor l-
fred E. Smith spoke recently on
behalf of President Roosevelt's r-e-
quest to repeal the arms embargo.
Smith's action brought him back to
the support of the President after
five years of disagreement.

Two British airmen (dark uniforms), officers of the Royal Air Force,
are shown chatting with German sergeants at a camp for prisoners of
war at Itzehoe, Germany. The Britons were brought down by German
aircraft over Thuringia, according to a caption passed by the British
censor.

i

i

I

I

. . . . . . . . . .
i , X

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan