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October 13, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Four Testify'
In Gibbs Case
Identify Relief Checks Sent
By County Clerk
(Continued from Page 1)
Gibb as relief head, the prosecution
would attempt to prove that more
than $5,000 was not turned over to
the county treasurer by him.
First witness in the afternoon ses-
sion, Webber, supervisor of North-
field township, testified that a check
for $598.08 had been turned over. to
Gibb on Sept. 27, 1938 without an
order from the township. The check'
was sent following a "conversation"
between Gibb and Freeman relative
to Northfield's account. Gibb never
made any refund, Freeman added.
Defense Attorney John Conlin's
eros-examin'ation of Webber revealed
that in several instances there was
great disparity between the dates of
the receipt by Webber of authority
to issue the relief checks and the
actual sending of the checks to Gibb.
As many as five months' bills on the
township were paid in one check.
In his counter-questioning Prose-
cutor Rapp insisted that no matter
how irregular the payments were, all
the money had been received by Gibb,
and the checks all bore his endorse-
ment.
Circuit Court Judge George W.
Sample will reconvene court at 9:30
a.m. today.
Electrical Engineers Meet
The Michigan Branch of the
American Institute of Electrical En-
gineers held its organization meeting
and smoker at 8 p.m. yesterday in
the Michigan Union. Dean A H.
Lovell, vice-president of the Great
Lakes District of the institute, in-
troduced the organization to, new
members.

CCC Imitates Robin Hood's Fashions

Enlarged Cyclotron Will Probe
Greater Mysteries Of Matter

By KARL KESSLER
Greater understanding of the inner
mysteries of matter has now been at-
tained through the physics depart-
ment's enlarged cyclotron, according
to Prof. James M. Cork, director of
cyclotron research.
Recent changes on the University's
95-ton cyclotron have brought its
power up to 10 million electron volts
at full operation, thus making it one
of the most powerful weapons for
"smashing atoms" now in operation.
Transmutation of elements has
now been rendered a relatively
simple matter with the aid of the
cyclotron. Especially spectacular re-
sults have been attained in the mu-
tation of the heavier elements such
as gold, platinum and mercury
Commercial value of these experi-
ments, however, is of no consequence,
as the quantity of element produced
by hours of exposure to the deuteron
beam can be detected only by deli-
cate spetroscopy.
Of greater practical importance
are the results obtained in the pro-
duction of radio-active substances.
Hitherto impossible results have now
been attained through the use of the
new cyclotron, Professor Cork indi-
cated, and is now possible to pro-

duce artificial radio-activity in any
element in the periodic table.
Along the line of pure physical
research, studies are being made
concerning the scattering effect of
neutron beams in passing through
matter. By means of such studies, a
greater knowledge of the forces be-
tween elementary particles of matter
has been gleaned.
A large number of abnormal iso-
topes, or atoms of atomic weight not
found in nature, have also been
formed. All of these isotopes in turn
disintigrate, emitting radiations and
ultimately .become stable elements.
An important problem today in
connection with the operation of the
cyclotron is that of shielding the op-
erator from the harmful effects of
the neutron radiation and secondary
radiations produced by the collisions
of these neutrons with atoms:
Neutron radiations differ from X-
ray and radium rays in that they pass
readily through lead or other heavy
metals, but can be absorbed by hy-
drogen-containing compounds. The
protecting screens now in use, there-
fore, consist of tanks of water . and
parafin blocks. The secondary ra-
diations must in turn be halted by
sheets of heavy metals.

CCC men stand at attention at

spruce green uniforms for Uncle .
New Postgraduate
Courses offered
Postgraduate courses in diagnostic
roentgenology will be offered medical
practitioners Oct. 30 to Nov. 4 by
University Hospital.
These courses will consider diag-
nosis of tuberculous and non-tuber-
culous lesions of the lungs, examin-
ation of the heart and diagnosis of
diseases of the chest wall and soft
tissues of the neck.
Dr. Fred J. Hodges, professor of
Roentgenology; Dr.. Vincent C.
Johnson and Dr. Isadore Lampe,
assistant professors of Roentgenolo-
gy, and Dr. Hobard H. Wright will
conduct the course.

5:
G
Y
f

Garrett Park, Md., showing off new
am's foresters.
Shtkespeare, Keats
Are Reincarnated
In Student_-Listings
With the appearance of the new
Student Directory yesterday, the
"Who's Got The Most Unusual Name"
Club swung into action, setting to

Four-Car Highways Prophesied
By Professor Morrison In Speech

477""""""

IIIa~

WEEK-END
SPECIALS
in
HOSI ERY
PAJAMAS,
SWEATERS
SMARTEST
HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Bldg.

DECORATE
with MUmS
during the foootball season.
Wear a yellow Mum or cor-
sage to the game tomorrow.
Single Mum .50c
Corsages .. .50c and up
CHELSEA
FLOWER SHOP
203 East Liberty
Telephone 2-2973

one side for a time the eager peru-
sal of telephone books, manuals and
atlases.
One of the first reports on oddi-
ties in the names brings to light the
presence of Mary Minor, '40, and
Mary Major, '41, who strangely
enough is a Theta pledge. Also there
is the Jones-Smith situation. There
are 32 Joneses listed in the directory,
not one of whom is John. The Smiths
lead the field, however, with a grand
total of 94 Smith students. Of these,
one comes right out and calls him-
self John, another hides behind Jack
and yet another under some suspicion
who goes under the tag of J. Paul.
A John Keats and a William
Shakespeare decorate the school ros-
ter with literary names, according to
the investigators. A final and ac-
cording to the Club, necessary addi-
tion, never to be neglected in in-
quiries of this nature, is the first
and last name in the book. And
here they are: Tony (female) Aals-
berg, '42L, and John Zytkewick, '42E.

Highways of the future were dis-
cussed by Prof. Roger L. Morrison
of the highway engineering depart-
ment in an address before Sigma
Rho Tau, honorary engineering
speech society.
Four-car highways with 100 mile-
an-hour traffic, two-decked city1
drives, and cloverleaf intersections
all describe the road of tomorrow,
Professor Morrison said. Yet the
price of such highways is estimated
at 47 billion dollars for a chain cov-
ering the whole country and connect-
ing the capitols of each state. Since
this amounts to about half of the to-
tal income per year; and since in
some sections of the country the
traffic rate is extremely low, with
the average trip for the whole na-
tion about 420 miles per trip, such a
road-building scheme would be al-
most futile.
The romance in the roadways of
tomorrow will therefore be concen-

trated in and around the heavily
populated centers. Here the high
cost of $300,000 per mile can be more
readily assumed by the taxpayers,
who will be users of the highways.
It is in such regions that the high-
way engineer will put most of his tal-
ents, Professor Morrison said.
Charles Forbes, '40E, baffled the
audience with some sleight-of-hand
tricks and other magic.
Club Calls For Members
Battle Creek students interested
in joining the University Battle Creek
Club today were urged to telephone
president Robert Irish, '41, at num-
ber 9431, or secretary Reid Hatilfled
at the Law Club. An organization
meeting of the club will be held in
the future. One of the activities
scheduled this year is an "all-college"
dance to be held in Battle Creek
during Christmas vacation.

F

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11

STAGS! CUT IN

-

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PEGGY SAGE
NEW POLISH
SHADES FOR HANDS
THAT CAST A SPELL...
Yellow-pink flame...
drnnocv m ir J .

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o a Lady's Loveliness ..
There is always an impulse for every young lady to
beautify herself - and the famous brands of cosmetics
and toiletries on display in this store are guaranteed
to add to your natural charm. Let our beauty expert
aid in your selection. Prices are as breath-taking as
the rarvelous new odors. Shop early and get a full
selection of your favorites at Ann Arbor's most com-
plete cosmetic department.
Qt LY A M
TUSSY RICH CREAM

Vibrant, exh
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ing as dark e
over veiled I

arapes your nger-
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glamour!
hila. /
dar-
eyes
ips.

(informal)
On the Selected Co-eds with
the CELLOPHANE HAIRBOWS.

I

Live cyclamen
pastel reminis-
cent of old Spain.
sixty ecents

V

To help overcome that uneasy
after-introduction feeling there will be-
* PING PONG
* RIDGE
* BINGO
* ROULETTE
* CHECKERS
for all those who wish to participate.
Everj Friday beginning Tonigt

Regular $1.75 Values

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To help smooth away flakiness
and that dry drawn look, discour-
age lines due to dryness. Leaves'

P. S.'It's the polish
that clients say
"twears like iron!". ..And
if you are troubled with
b rittl e p it ingu al s.i

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