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February 24, 1940 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S

SATURDAY, FEB. 24, 1940

T T-F -i f iT -G--AN A V

f'tb

fourth InformalDance For Grad Students To Be Held Sa

turday



Da.1nce Lessonfs
BeginTuesday
Beginners Meet Separate
From Advance Class
League dancing classes will be-re-
newed next Tuesday, Ella Stowe, '40A,
chairman of the social dance commit-
tee, announced- yesterday.
Miss Ethel McCormick, assisted by
Elva Pascoe, formerly of the Arthur
Murray dance classes held at the Wol-
verine, will teach the series which will
consist of eight lessons. The begin-
ning class will meet at 7:30 p.m. and
the advanced class will meet at 8:30
p.m.
Miss McCormick and Miss Pascoe
will be assisted by a group of special-
ly trained members of the League
committee, who will have private in-
struction in all basic steps, includ-
ing fox trot, waltz, La Conga, and
tango steps which will be taught in
the classes.
All women wishing to join the
training class should get in touch with
miss Stowe from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Mon-
day at the Undergraduate Offices in
the League.
Women will be admitted free to
the classes, Miss Stowe said, but men
will be charged $3.00 for the course of
eight lessons.
It costs $56.50 to outfit a football
player with first class equipment.

Trim Outfit For Spring

For spring sports this full checked
skirt is just right. The flannel shirt,
in a pastel shade, is practical, with
its big pockets.

MEET ME AT THE SUGAR BOWL
You'll. like the
Sugar Bowl-
4 COMPLETE and EXCELLENT MEALS have always made the
Sugar Bowl the favorite of thousands of Michigan students. Why
not have Sunday dinner with us tomorrow? We will be happy to
see you.
COMPLETE DINNERS from 50c
V Always prime meats and fresh vegetables
3 EXCELLENT FOUNTAIN SERVICE COMFORTABLE BOOTiHS
Preketes SUGAR BOWL
108 SOUTH MAIN

1

Men, Women
Are Welcome
To Come Stag
Dance To Be Open To All
Students Holding B.A.;
Faculty Also Invited
Fourth of the dances :n the current
series of graduate affairs will be held
from 9:30 p.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday
in the third floor reception hall of
the Rackham Building, Joseph H.
Fleisher, Grad., announced yester-
day.
The dances, which are given about
every two weeks, are opened to all
persons holding a Bachelor of Arts
degree or its equivalent; this includes
students of the professional schools.
Mdmbers of the faculty are also in-
vited; several parties of professors
are planning to attend this fourth
affair.
Informality is the keynote of the
evening. Music is furnished by phono-
graph records, which are completely
changed at each succeeding dance.
Since the purpose of the series is pri-
marily to serve as mixers, both men
and women students are urged to
come singly.
Over one hunded persons attended
the last of the phonograph dances,
which are held about every two weeks.
Informal street dress is worn, in keep-
ing with the general atmosphere of
the affair. Refreshments will be
served during the evening. Twenty-
five cents per person admission is
charged, music will be continuous
throughout the program.
Former Music
Student Given
Movie Plaudits
By PEARL BROWN
Having entered the field of music
at the age of seven and having won
recognition through his concert abil-
ity and appearances with major or-
chestras, Dalies Frantz, '30SM, is
now considered by many to be one
of the most brilliant musicians ever
graduated from the University Scho l
of Music.
Frantz, who recently appeared ir
the movie "Balalaika," came to the
University in 1926 where he began
studying piano with Guy Maier. These
studies Wvere interrgpted by brief
periods during which time he studied
in Europe with Artur Schnable and
Vladimir Horowitz, and in 1930 he
graduated from the University School
of Music with highest honors.
He was blessed withthe advantages
of a musical family and made his
first public appearances with his
mother, a concert musician, on local
tours.
At the age of 16, while still a stu-
dent at Huntington School, Frantz
was able to earn his way by means of
recitals, concerts and as organist and
director of church choirs.
After graduating from the Uni-
versity, Frantz won the competition
whach was opened for solo appear-
ance with the Detroit Symphony
Orchestra. He later entered the
Naumburg Foundation competition
with 100 other contestants and won
for himself New York debut recital
opportunities.
He won in 1933 the national com-
petition offered by the National Fed-
eration of Msic Clubs combined with
Schubert Memorial, which offered
solo appearance with a major New
York orchestra. Among the judges
for this contest were Albert Spawd-
ing, Lawrence Tibbett, Eugene Or-
mandy, Rudolph Ganz and Ernest

Schelling,
This award offered opportunities
that were responsible for his crown-
ing triumph, first in Philadelphia and

rHarlem's Aristocrat Of Jazz'
Says Students Are Barometers

Duke Ellington Is Fained
Composer, Interpreter
Of PureNegro Music
By ESTHER OSSER
When a band specializes in neither
"swing" nor "sweet" music, but in-
stead attempts to interpret "unadul-
terated Negro music," that's news.
And that's what "Harlem's aristocrat
of jazz," Duke Ellington, currently
appearing at the Michigan Theatre,
is creating.
As famous a composer as he is a
bandleader, the versatile maestro,
with the aid of 15 men and a girl, has
developed a musical combination dis-
tinctive for its unusual arrangements
and above the ordinary in its fine
musicianship.
Has Fine Appreciation
Ellington has not only a theory of,
music, however, but a sensitive appre-
ciation of the tastes of his audience.
Thus, his arrangements and the num-
bers he features change successively
for stage appearances, concerts and
night club engagements.
In determining what style of music
will gain popular acclaim, Ellington
holds that the tastes of college stu-
dcnts are a sensitive barometer and,
he added, they "usually have very
good taste." (It might be that their
enthusiastic reception of such Elling-
ton compositions as "Sophisticated
Lady," "In My Solitude," "Mood In-
digo," "Caravan" and "I Let A Song
Go Out Of My Heart" has disarmed
him.)
Most of the men in the band, Ell-
ington said, have been with him for
more than 10 years. In fact four of
the five men in the original Elling-
ton orchestra still number among the
band's members, he added.
Started In New York
Ellington got his start in the music
business when he and five others
journeyed to New York from Wash-
ington, D.C., in 1923, to play with
Wilbur Sweatman, who at that time
was one of the biggest jazz figures in
the country. "We didn't do so well,
however," the piano-playing maestro
recalled. "So in order to get over a
bad case of hunger, we went back to
Washingtonto fortify ourselves before
going back to conquer the world."
Their next venture proved to be

more successful. With the band en- j
larged to six pieces, Ellington moved
into the Kentucky Club in New York,
this time under his own name, and
stayed therefor four years. Harlem's'
famous "Cotton Club" was their next
stop, and so successful were they that
they were called back in 1933 and1
again in 1937--the last two times'
appearing with famous torch singer
Ethel Waters.
In between times, Ellington made
trips to Europe where he won phe-
nomenal acclaim with both English
and continental audiences and also
appeared in several moving pictures
including "Belle of the Ninetiees" and
"Hit Parade of 1938."
Petitions Continue
For Scholarships
Petitions for the Ethel McCormick
scholarships are still being accepted
in the Undergraduate Office of the
League, Betty Slee, '40, chairman of
Judiciary Council, announced yester-
day.
Blanks for petitioning may be ob-
tained at the Office, Miss Slee said,
and sophomores and juniors are eli-
gible to apply. There are three schol-
arships of $100 each, to be awarded
to women who have participated in
League activities, who have main-
tained a satisfactory scholastic aver-
age, and need is also considered as
a factor in making the awards.
The requirement for scholarship is
no longer a 2.7 average, as has been
the previous custom, but applicants
must have an average high enough to
be eligible. Winners will be paid in
cash unless they do not return to
school in the fall.

t]
F
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McArthur-Johnson
NuptialsAnnounced
Announcement has been made of
the marriage of Rosemary McArthur,
40, to C. M. Johnson, Jr., of Benton
Habror, by Mr. and Mrs. William
Arnold, of Ann Arbor. Miss McArth-
ur is affiliated with Delta Gamma
sorority.
Mrs. Charles E. Hart of Ann Arbor
has announced the engagement of her
daughter, Mary Louise, '39, to Harry
L. Hallock, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. R.
Hallock of Royal Oak.
Miss Hart is affiliated with Pi
Beta Phi sorority, and also a member
of Pi Lambda Theta and Phi Kappa
Phi, honor societies. Mr. Hallock
who is a graduate of the Detroit Busi-
ness Institute, will receive his degree
from the University in June. He is a
member of Sigma Chi fraternity.
Dance Chairman Needed
Badly For Frosh Frolic
A dance chairman is badly needed
for Frosh Project, Betty Slee, '40,
chairman of Judiciary Council, an-
nounced yesterday.
Any freshman woman who has had
experience in this kind of work is
eligible for the position, Miss Slee
said. She mustdbe able to teachtap
and soft-shoe dancing, make up rou-
tines, and direct.
Women interested in applying for
the position will be interviewed from
3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, at the League.

rl

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Continued from Page 4)
a.m. "Why Are We Here" will be the
subject of the sermon by Dr. W. P.
Lemon.
5:30 p.m. Westminster Student
Guild will meet for supper and fel-
lowship hour. At 7 o'clock they will
show the picture "The Healing of
M'Vonda.," a two-reel motion picture
in color, taken in Africa by Dr. Robert
McCrackin.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Sunday service at 10:30 a.m., subject
"Mind." Sunday School at 11:45 a.m.
Baptist Church: 9:30 Graduate
Bible Class, Prof. LeRoy Waterman,
teacher.
10:45: Morning worship, sermon
topic, "Thy God-My God."
12:00. Student Round Table discus-
sion topic, "What is the Christian
Attitude Toward the State?"
6:15* Roger Williams' Guild in the
Guild House, 503 E. Huron. Prof.
LeRoy Waterman will talk on "Why
a New Translation of the Bible?"
Unitarian Church: 11 a.m. "Well
Known Congressmen" sermon by Rev.
Marley.
7:30 p.m. Round Table Discussion,
Mr. George Frank; Grad., will speak
on "A Student Looks at Religion."
Refreshments following.

SECRETA RIAL and
Combine the theoretical with the practical
*
Hamilton Business College
25th Year William at State

DUKE ELLINGTON

Ii

a

Here is the fastest teakettle you
.;>.,.: can buy. For hot water in a
hurry, simply plug into the
nearest electric outlet. The
kettle has a special high-speed
element that eats nearly a gal-
It will save you time and steps.
$4.95 at any Detroit Edison
office-.

0

'
,
t
i

Tryouts Meet Monday
A general meeting of all persons
interested in trying out for the
editorial staffs, of The Daily, in-
cluding the women's staff, will be
held at 4 p.m. Monday at the Pub-
lications Building. Second-sem-
ester freshmen and upper-class-
men are eligible for work on The
Daily.
then in New York as soloist with the
Philadelphia Orchestra, Leopold Sto-
kowske, conductor.
Frantz made riis first important
screen appearance in "Balalaika" as
the leading lady's radical brother who
was shot. Before that time he had
appeared as accompanist to Jeannette
MacDonald in "Sweethearts."
In addition to his musical activi-
ties, Frantz participated in numerous
sports, and while still at Huntington
School became captain of the swim-
ming team and won several cham-
pionship awards.
His boyhood dream was to become
a concert pianist, a dream that is
coming to be a reality.

U0 <=>o.oo~o<=>)<o<>C) o^ ==x) 3 C) !"{)<22,
A N.EW; H'ATri
e#i the pastel shades-will add to the appearance g
of your winter costume. It's worth trying!
3.00and up
oDANA RICHARDSON
309 South State ... at the Dillon Shop
Uo e a c

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jrj

ime

L hining ,

Iflew

diti aj

Honoatry Speech
Elects 1940

Society
Oficers

y/aur

Zau/orde

Ca mpus

Shoe

S

Plaid Laces Are Fad
Perhaps you thiught that plaid
shoe-laces made their last appear-
ance with 1939 but, happily enough,
they are again brightening the saddle
shoe landscape this season. Brilliant
reds, blues and greens too, are taking
their places in the fashion parade

Jane Sapp, '41, has been elected
president of Athena, honorary speech
society, for the year 1940. Other new
officers are Ellen MacDonald, '40,
vice-president; Ruth Fitzpatrick, '40,
treasurer; Jean Ramsey, '40, secre-
tary, and Beth Caster, '41, social
chairman.
RADIO and
MICHIGAN Cobs
Phones
3030 or 7000

J3 ROWN AND WHITE SADDLES
pi skits-grain ecicalf .. . oiled
calf. Well-made, with rubber
soles, they're the shoes you ask
for season after season.. Ready
now for your first touch of Spring
fever!

A- +f

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-- - -- - - -__ AT THE E_-- --
%l7ickigan Lea que ____
_____ HARRY RITZ __

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