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February 24, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

s TlU;;rr, V FeB 24,

Chicago Professor Finds Fault
With TableCarver's Scoring

By JAY McCORM CK
The score of the Chicago-Michigan
football game in 1905 was emphat-
ically not 0-0 as it appears on one
of the carved table-tops lining the
walls of the Union taproom "The
guy that carved that was crazy," said
Prof. Wellington B. Jones, University
of Chicago geographer yesterday.
"The score was 2-0 in favor of Chi-
cago."
And Professor Jones, who has been
visiting members of the geography
department and other faculty men
here for the past week, should know.
A varsity football man in the days
of Alonzo Stagg, he sat through that
famous game on the bench, and so
regards himself informed on the
event. At a recent Rotary club
luncheon here he confronted Coach
Fielding H. Yost with the evidence,

and stated that if Lff espeeches adi-
n't begun just then, he would have
forced the Grand Old Man of Mich-
igan athletics to admit the mistake.
Concerning the withdrawal of Chi-
cago from Big Ten football, Profes-
sor Jones, varsity letter man in the
days of Alonzo Stagg, expressed the
hope that football will not die out
entirely there. He believes that a
well planned football program ei-
ther with smaller schools, or intra-
murally, will go on.
Known as the dean of American
geographers in the field of the Far
East, Professor Jones was one of the
first men in this country to offer a
course in Oriental Geography. Prof.
Robert B. Hall, of the geography de-
partment, director of the Far East-
ern Institute, took his first course in
the geography from Professor Jones.

Thomas Gives
Dem onstra lion
LeeLu re ,Friday
Research Director Slated
To Show Illustrations
Of Science's Advance
Recent advancements in applied
scientific research will feature the
demonstration lecture to be present-
ed at 8 p.m. Friday in the Lecture
Hall of the Rackham Building by
Dr. Phillips Thomas, research di-
rector for the Westinghouse Electric
and Manufacturing Company.
Brought here under the auspices
of the department of electiical en-
gineering, the demonstration lecture
will offer a host of spectacular and
informative illustrations of the the-
ory and application of recent tech-
nical developments in the various
branches of science.
Demonstrated here will be an ul-
tra-powered light, no larger than a
two-inch lead pencil, yet capable
of generating an intensity of illumin-
ation equal to one-fifth of that on
the sun's surface.
The killing power of ultra-violet
light of particularly selected wave
lengths on microscopic organisms
will be portrayed to the audience
by a special demonstration fitted for
throwing images of microscopic life
upon the auditorium screen.
Dr. Thomas, who will demonstrate
the apparatus and furnish the run-
ning commentary, is a graduate of
Ohio State University. He received
a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1911
from Princeton University, where he
had previously spent five years as
an instructor. He has since been
connected with the engineering and
research divisions of the Westing-
house Electric Company.

Forum To Be Held
The second of a series of five for-
ums patterned after the Spring and
Winter Parleys will be held from 6 to
8 p.m. tomorrow in First Methodist
Church under the auspices of the
Wesleyan Guild.
Open to students of all denomina-
tions, the discussion will deal with
"Peace," "Workers' Rights and the
Industrial Problem," "Racial Di-s-
crimination," and "After College Ad-
justments."
Separate discussions on these sub-
jects will be conducted simultaneous-
ly. Persons participating are to en-
ter the group in whicli they are most
interested and to which they consider
themselves best able to contribute re-
marks and suggestions,
Corey Will Speak
Here O Socialism,
Lewis Corey, labor leader and au-
thor, will speak on "The Re-Creation
of Socialism", at 8 p.m., Thurs-
day at the Natural Science Audi-
torium under the auspices of the
league for Liberal Action.
Mr. Corey's lecture is the second
in a series of five talks on social and
economic problems arising from the
depression. Author of "The Decline
of American Capitalisin," Mr. Corey
is now on a tour of the United States,
presenting lectures as part of the
League for Industrial Democracy's
series which originated eight years
ago,
The Woman's College of the Uni-
versity of North Carolina has a foot-
ball team.

Maure-r B-1-imes School Systets
Propagarv
t>> ;,all,1lti1', :is- Iieial makes people 511 t'C,)(ihI
cendency in democracy through propaganda, he concluded, and
propaganda under the guise of pub- school system is in a good par
lie counselor principally because the sponsible for this by their m(
I public school system has failed to of instruction which is still too 1
EF train its citizen for clear, indepen- a process of teachers handing ,
dent and pertinent thinking, Prof. Judgments in various fields to
Wesley H. Maurer of the journalism students.
department said in an address last
night at the Hillel Foundation.
Propaganda, Professor Maurer ex-
plained, is a "systemic disorder that
has developed because we have low-
ered the natural resistance of the
democratic body politic through
mental coddling and ideological pro-
tection". The inethod of treatment,
he continued, is obviously not sur-
gery nor yet isolation and further
protection, but a building up again
of the natural resistance through ex-
ercises in self-reliance and indepen-
dence in thinking.
Professor Maurer continued by you Ott +e
saying that we are prone to blame
propaganda on the propagandists Never would you be so co
and that suggestions were being
made that we should pass laws curb- strewn about as to the ab
ing the special pleaders. Yet, he said, in your bank. , And in the
freedom of speech and press mean priceless possessions of jew
freedom to engage in propaganda them in a SAFE DEPOSF
and it must be presumed that many
who address us are likely to be moved Rates are surprisingly low,
by the most selfish of motives, by their protection and you.
Were faith in the democratic pro-
cesses :till adventurous and bold, he
claimed, instead of attempting to si-
lence certain people, we would deal A nn A r
with the problem in a virile fashion.
"We would operate,,, he said, "on c om r
the old maxim that the cure for the ills of democracy is more democracy.
We would develop the powers of dis- Southeast Corner
crimination by providing more exer- of Main and Huron
cises in discrimination."
The trait of being unreal and arti-

ale to
d the
rt re-
Lethod
mach
down
their

1va:tiiiirfcii-
tea-,,t lizii1_il . i -
iii(irS utill roooll"r (h.11 iltj)P 'itiN
Court Justice Frank Murphy would
resign from the high court to seek
the Democratic vice-presidential
nomination.
Friends of the former Michigan
governor admitted the gossip might
have some basis.

..._.

Murphy Seems. Re'S for Ing
_ s tip -ei-lie 1-.,6uft

I

Classified Directory

d never Ap Thij:

i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFI ED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (in basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
nore insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
Inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 15c.
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street,
TYPING -18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public, excellent work,
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
LAUNDERING--9{
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16

MISCELLANEOUS--20
SPECIAL-$5.50 Machineless Per-
manent $2.50; $3 oil cocona $1.50;
end permanent $1. Shampoo and
fingerwave 35c. Phone 8100, 1171
Main. 36
SINGING CANARIES $5 and $6. Fe-
males $1. Strawberry Finches $4.50
pair. Feeds, cages. Ruffins, phone
5330.
FOR RENT
ROOM. Downstairs front. Private
bath and entrance. Cooking facil-
ities available. Between Vniversity
and hospital. 6833. 291
KITCHENETTE APT.: Completely
furnished; new gas range; refrig-
eration. Phone and janitor service.
Phone 5491. 294
ROOM: Inner-spring mattress, three
shewers, ping pong. Rate $3. Phone
4844. Miss Lombard. 807 S. State,
286
FOR RENT-Cozy and warm room
for student or business man. Price
$3. 1001 Forest, telephone 7498.
289
,ARTICLES FOR SALE-3
FOR SALE: Red cocker puppies. Lit-
ter registered. Two males, one fe-
male. Phone 6467. 292
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND -1
LOST: Men's Hamilton Wristwatch
at Field House. Yellow gold, initials
R.F.A. Bob Acker, 2-1170. 293

:areless with your money as to. leave it
bove picture. Instead you safeguard it
same way you should take came of those
arelry, valuable papers, etc. by putting
IT BOX while you are in Ann Arbor.
and you will be repaid many times over
,it peace of mind.
rbor Savings
iinercial Bank

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NICKELS ARCADE
at State Street

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Clean, Pure, Refreshing

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44661

CHURCH

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DIRECTORY

Phone 8270

r

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ACE HAND LAUNDRY-Wants only
one trial to prove we launder your
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity. 19
TRANSPORTATION -71
WASHED SAND AND GRAVELS-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WANTED -TO BUY-- 4
WANTED: Round trip fare to Chi-
cago. See Julian Harris for details.
Will pay well. E. Jess.
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
A dozen times a day,
you'll appreciate the
quick, easy source of
hot water provided by
this electric teakettle.
For washing dishes, for :<>
cooking, for the laun-
dry, for baby's bath, '><
for shaving, shampoos,
housecleaning. and
countless other tasks,
this kettle gives you
nearly a gallon of hot
water in a hurry.
$4.95 at any Detroit
Edison office.
. \4.. ... >' 1 : :1'

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HILLEL FOUNDATION
Fast University at Oakland. Dial 3779.
Dr. Isaac Rabinowitz, Director.
Today 3:00 P.M. Avukah Study Group.
4:30 P.M. Avukah Social.
Sunday, 11:00 A.M. Reform Services. Jerome
Mecklenburger, reader. Sermon by Dr. Rab-
inowitz: "Roshi, the Prince of Commenta-
tors."
Tuesday, 7:00 P.M. Conversational Hebrew Class.
Wednesday, 7:15 P.M. Jewish History Class.
Friday, 7:30 P.M. Conservative Services.
8:00 P.M. Fireside Discussion. Prof. Etting-
hausen, speaker. Subject: "The Art of the
Jews in Islamic Countries." Illustrated with
slides. Social following the discussion.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine at Division Street.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector.
Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant Minister.
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rt."
Rev. Frank E. Wilson, D.D., bishop of Eau
Claire, Wisconsin.
11:00 A.M'. Junior Church.
11:00 A.M. Kindergarten in Harris Hall.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild in Harris Hall. Gen-
eral student discussion : . What Jesus of Naz-
areth Stood For."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
Sunday, 10:30 A.M. Services.
11:45 A.M. Sunday School.
Nednesday, 7:30 P.M. Wednesday Evening Meet-
ing.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets.
Leonard A. ,Parr, D.D., Minister.
Director of Music, Donn Chown.
Organist, Mrs. Mary McCall Stubbins.
9:30 A.M. Junior and intermediate departments
of the Church School.
' 10:00 A.M. Symposium on Religious Beliefs--
"Why I Am a Catholic," by Prof. W. A. Mc-
Laughlin.
10:30 A.M. Primary and kindergarten depart-
ments of the Church. School.
10:45 A.M. Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on "The Faith We Maintain-That God Is
Still the Inescapable."

j FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial 2-4466.
William P. Lemon, D .D., Minister.
Lillian Dilts, Assistant.
William N. Barnard, Director of Music.
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all age
groups.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship Service. "Why
Are We Here?" will be the subject of the
sermon by Dr, W. P. Lemon.
10:45 A.M. Nursery for those desiring to leave
their small children while they attend the
morning service.
4:30 P.M. Westminster Student Guild group
singing in the Lewis-Vance parlors.
5:30 P.M. Westminster Student Guild will meet
for supper and fellowship hour. At 7:00
o'clock they will show the picture "The
Healing of M'Vonda" a two-reel motion pic-
ture in color, taken in Africa by Dr. Robert
McCracken.
6:00 P.M. Meeting of the Tuxis Society, high
school group, in the Vance parlor.
8:00 P.M. The Sunday Evening Club will meet
in the Lewis-Vance parlors.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of 512 East Huron.
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister.
Mr. Roland Schaefer, Minister of Music.
Mr. Clyde Stitt, Organist.
9:30 A.M. Graduate *Bible Class.
Prof. LeRoy Waterman, teacher.
10:45 A.M. Moning Worship. Sermon topic: "Thy
God-My God."
12:00 Noon Student Round Table. Discussion
topic : "What is the Christian Attitude To-
ward the State?"
6:15 P.M. Roger William's Guild in the Guild
House, 503 East Huron. Prof. LeRoy Water-
man will speak on "Why a New Translation
of the Bible?"
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
432 South Fourth Avenue. Dial 8498.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon topic:
"Building Upon the Rock."
6:00 P.M. Student Fellowship Supper.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State. and Washington Streets.
Charles W. Brashares, Minister.
Choir Director, Hardin Van Deursen.
C)raa.nict T%4nrv Pnrter_

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