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November 02, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-11-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOv. 2. 1938

..... .... . ... . .; .. ., .. ,.,.. _ m . . .

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30; 11:00 a.m. on Saturday.

Students Discuss London Was Found Unprepared
Realistic Program
(Continued from Pae 1In Czech Crisis, Says Prof. Windt
( r g1) _________________

There's a sucker born every min placed it on exhibition. People from
"was P. T. Barnum's classic quote all over the nation flocked to view the
reference to the gullibility of the miracle at half a dollar a head and

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2, 1938
VOL. XLIX. No. 331
Notices
Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Ruthven will be at home to students,
Wednesday from 4 to 6 p.m.
The George Davis Bivin Founda-
tion Prizes in the mental hygiene of
childhood. The University of Michi-
gan announces, through a gift of ther
George Davis Bivin Foundation, Inc.,
the availability for the year 1938-i
39 of several prizes for graduate and
undergraduate students for the en-
couragement of research and study
on problems concerned with the men-1
tal hygiene of childhood. Similar1
awards were made for the years
1936-37 and 1937-38.
Awards of $35, $20 and $10 are
offered to graduate students for a
Master's thesis or special studies.
Awards of $20. $10 and $5 are offered
for papers submitted by advanced
undergraduate students.
The following conditions govern
the awards:
1. Papers may be submitted by stu-
dents in any division of the Univer-
sity.
2. Doctoral dissertations are ex-
cluded from consideration for the
awards.
3. In order to be considered for an
award for the current year, papers
must reach the chairman of the com-
mittee, 2509 University Elementary
School, not later than four o'clock,
June 3, 1939.
4. Copies of all prize winning pa-
pers are to be sent to the Secretary
of the Foundation. The Foundation
reserves the right to publish such
papers if it so desires.
5. Awards may be withheld if, in
the judgment of the committee, no
papers of sufficient merit are con-
tributed. The committee also re-
serves the right to adjust the amounts
when papers of equal merit are sub-
mitted or if such division will better
serve the purposes of the grant.
6. The following committee has
been designated by the Graduate
School to administer the award:
Professor Martha Guernsey Colby,
Professor Howard Yale McClusky,
and Professor Willard C. Olson
(chairman).
C. S. Yoakum,
Graduate School.
Rackham Building; Open every day
except Sunday from 8 a.m. until 10
p.m. for the use of graduate students
and graduate organizations.
The Bureau of Appointments has
received notice of the following Civil
Service Examinations. Last date for
applications to be accepted is given
in each case.
Michigan:
Food Service Helper, salary $75-90,
Nov. 14, 1938.
Key Drive Calculator Clerk, salary
$95-110, Nov. 13, 1938.
Veterinarian, salary $150-190, Dec.
7, 1938
Attendant Nurse, salary $80-100,
Nov. 21, 1938.
United States:
Airway Traffic Control Operator,
salary $2,000, Nov. 28, 1938.
Principal Inustrial Toxicologist,
salary $5,600, Nov. 28, 1938.
Complete announcements of the

above examinations can be had at the
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information, 201
Mason Hall.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information.
201 Mason Hall. Office Hours: 9-12
and 2-4.
University Division of the Com-i
munity Fund Campaign: The Politi-i
cal Science office, 2037 Angell:Hall,
is the headquarters for the University
Division of the Community 'Fund
Campaign. Solicitors may leave their
reports in this office at any time be-
tween 2:30 a.m. and 12 noon and 1:30
p.m. and 4:30 p.m. However, it will
expedite the campaign if daily reports
are filed during the following hours,
when a representative of the Fund
will be on duty in 2037 Angell Hall:
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 3-4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 2, 3-4:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 3, 3-4:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 4, 3-4:30 p.m.
Academic Notices
Students, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts: Courses dropped
after Saturday, Nov. 5, by students
other than freshmen will be recorded
E. Freshmen (students with less
than 24 hours of credit) may drop
courses without penalty through the
eighth week. Exception may be
made in extraordinary circumstances,
such as severe or long continued ill-
ness.
E. A. Walter, Assist. Dean.
Chemistry 63. For blue book on
Thursday, Nov. 3, sections 1 and 2
will meet in Room 151 and Sections
3 in Room 464.
Freshmen in the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts may ob-
tain their five-week progress reports
in the Academic Counselors' Office,
Room 108 Mason Hall, from 8 to 12
a.m. and 1:30 ,to 4:30 p.m. according
to the following schedule.
Surnames beginning A through G,
Wednesday, Nov. 2.
Surnames beginning H through O,
Thursday, Nov. 3.
Surnames beginning P through Z,
Friday, Nov. 4.

as it seems, Orson Welles' program
was the most real-
istic and yet thel
most fantastic ra-
dio drama I've
heard. The panic
described in the
Free Press was due
to people who eith-
er failed to hear
the entire program
or listened irra.
tionally. We need more programs like
that, more power to both Wells and
Welles."
Arelene Krieger, '41: "I think it
ridiculous to talk of punishing Orson1
Welles or the Columbia Broadcasting
System for the
play Sunday night.
I think we need
more of that type
of thing to show
up the smug com-
placency of the
average American.
The fact that Mie
entire nation was
thrown into hys-
teria should be a striking and vivid
warning to us all Personally, I
think Mr. Welles, who is probably
the most remarkable figure in Ameri-
can drama today, has "pulled a fast
one."
Bert Hyman, '42: "This radio skit

By MORTON JAMPEL
Describing a frenzied hysterical
London populace hoping againstl
hopes for what seemed to be inevit-
ible war, Valentine B. Windt. direc-
tor of Play Productions yesterday de-'
scribed his experiences in Europe;
during the Czechoslovakian crisis.
The incident served to show that
Britain was totally unprepared for
such a situation, Professor Windt
said, and she is now rearming at a
great rate against the possibility of
the recurrence of such a situation.
The director of Play Production,
who had visited Startford-on-Avon,
Malvern and Dublin, to study the
theatre, described the frantic prepar-
ations made In London the three days
preceding Oct. 1, when Hitler had
announced he would take-Czechoslo-
vakia.
Children were shipped out of the
city in great numbers, and everyone
who coud afford to, made prepara-
tions to leave town. It was expected
that London would bear the brunt
of a vicious and sudden attack.
Trenches and bomb-proof shelters
were dug in Hyde Park and every-
where else possible. It was like living

In

-=- 1

Here's A

I

Different. try a
WEGENER'S alted
N OriginalMilk
r ROCK & RY E

1

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presented Sunday
night was much
too r e a 1. The,
amount of fright it
instilled in the lis-
teners was tremen-
dous. Ask me-I
know! I can't re-
member any time
when I was more
genuinely fright-
ened. I went so far as to calf my home
to find if there was any trouble there.
You can imagine how I felt when
the telephone didn't work,

0
.
4
0
0

It's
aS
Smooth
as
Silk

F /

in a country actually at war, Profes-
sor Windt said.
Chamberlain's speech, before his
trip to Munich, was received by a
weeping people. Their reAction when
war was averted was tremendous,
Professor Windt related. A two-day
celebration, reminiscent of the Arm-
istice, took place.

Buy one large 8 oz. size
bottle of ASTRING-O-SOL,
the concentrated mouth-
wash at the regular price
89Vc
- and receive absolutely
Free a 35c tube of
ASTRING-0-SOL TOOTH-
PASTE

-.,- ---T--- .

III

RED TE PLAYERS
inf
Highlights of Chinese Theatre Arts
(in English)
A thrilling of performnce of
DANCE, MUSIC and SHADOW PLAYS
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Friday, Nov. 4,1938 8:30 P.M.
Box Office Open Ndvember 2 Mail Orders Now!
Telephone 6300 75c and 50c

DOES MORE

TASTES BETTER

Concerts
Organ Recital. Palmer Christian.
University organist, will appear in re-
cital on the Frieze Memorial Organ,
Hill Auditorium, Wednesday dfter-
noon, Nov. 2, at 4:15 p.m. No admis-
sion charge is made, but the public is
respectfully requested to be seated on
(Continued on Page 4)

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