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October 16, 1938 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

A U

Counter Sale
Opens Monday
Oratorical Series Season
Tickets Still Available
Over the counter sales of season
and single admission tickets for the
1938-1939 Oratorical Association Lec-
ture Series will open Monday at 10
a.m. at the Hill Auditorium box of-
fice according t". an announcement
made by Prof. Carl G. Brandt, busi-
ness manager of the Association. Sea-
son tickets are still available at each.
of the prices and good locations
can still be obtained in each price
section.
The Association has secured eight
lecturers of world renown coveringl
the fields of exploration, adventure,
literature, economics and world af-
f airs.
The first of these lectures is
"Woollcott Speaking" to be presented
on Oct. 25 by Alexander Woollcott.
He will be followed by former Bel-
gian Premier Paul Van Zeeland, au-
thor Bruce Lockhart, Lord Strabolgi,
Captain C. W. R. Knight, Col. W.

Protest Wage Cuts In Railroad Hearing

Stewart-Roddie and others.
Funeral Of Alumnus,
In Auto Crash Held

Slain
Here

David Grey Taylor, '82, who died
Oct. 10 in Longbeach, Calif., follow-
ing an automobile accident, will be
buried Sunday in Forest Hill Ceme-
tery. Rev. Leonard Parr of the First
Congregational Church will officiate.
Mr. Taylor, for many years a prac-
ticing attorney, was the eldest son
of David H. and Martha Hill Taylor.
His brother, W. W. Taylor of Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., will arrive here Sun-
day.
Allen-Rumsey Dance
The Allen-Rumsey Dorm held its
first dance this year last night in the
Rumsey Dining Room to the music
of Bill McKay's orchestra. Mrs.
Niles, Mr. and Mrs. Peake, Miss Wel-
kar, and Mr. Meyers chaperoned the
party which was held in an autumnal
atmosphere. The party gained mo-
mentum with demonstrations of the
Lambeth Walk and vocalizing by the
guests.
BARGAINS
THE CITADEL by A. J.
Cronin; was $2.50..
Now. ..$1.39
ARTIC ADVENTURE,
by Peter Freuchen; was
$3.00now.....$1.49
MAN THE UNKNOWN

Max Lowenthal (left), special counsel for the Senate Interstate Com-
merce Committee, and Senator Harry S. Truman (D., Mo.) conferred
in Washington at hearing of emergency board attempting to avert
a general railroad strike in the face of a threatened fifteen per cent
wage cut. Both testified, protesting any wage cut.
Institute Carries On A Successful
Battle Against Pernicious Anemia

By RICHARD HARMEL
Curiosity about the blood has caused
scientists the world over to observe
and attempt to cure its diseases, and
Dr. Cyrus Sturgis and his associates,
Dr. Raphael Isaacs, 'Dr. Milton Gold-
hamer and Dr. Frank Bethell, have
been working on blood research since
the founding of the University's
Thomas Henry Simpson Memorial
Institute for Medical Research in
1927.
Their work has been made possible
by the gift of the widow of Thomas
Henry Simpson, a Detroit steel manu-
facturer, whose death was caused by
pernicious anemia.
The Institute's research in perni-
cious anemia was prompted by the
desire to discover a cure for the dis-
ease in which a stomach defect pre-
vents the secretion of a gastric enzyme
whose function is to make a sub-
stance out of the food which causes
red blood cells to mature. Its efforts
gained success in 1929 when Dr. Stur-
gis and Dr. Isaacs developed the dried
stomach treatment, a discovery fol-
lowed by another in 1933 in which a
liver extract is injected intra-venous-
ly. These discoveries in the field of
pernicious anemia were just as im-
portant as the use of an anti-toxin
as a preventive of diphtheria.
The failure of the stomach to pro-
duce a gastric enzyme and the result-
ant "gross" immaturity of the red
blood cells received the attention of
Drs. George Minot and William Mur-
phy in Boston. They developed the
use of liver, or liver extract, in com-
batting the disease in 1926.
The successful use of liver extract
and desiccated stomach in the treat-
ment of pernicious anemia did not
mean the cessation of research in that
subject. The Anti-Anemia Advisory
Board of the United States Pharmo-
copeia had presented the problem of
setting up standards for liver extract
potency. The Institute, having treat-
ed 900 cases (by far the largest num-
ber treated in any one place) since
its founding, was able to devise such
standards in the clinic and laboratory.

It not only concerned itself with liver
extract potency but also with dessi-
cated stomach potency. Thus, the In-
stitute now has charts which tell'-by
means of a graduated curve the exact
percentage of new red blood cells that
a patient will have on a certain day
after treatment with either liver ex-
tract or dessicated stomach.
The Institute has also developed
standards for immature red blood
cell production, mature red blood cell
production and normal blood. The
creation of a standard for normal
blood was an important step for as one
of the Institute members said, "You
cannot tell the abnormal, if you do'
not know the normal."
Law Associations
To Hear Sunderland
Prof. Edson R. Sunderland of the
Law School left Friday for New York
City where he will be one of the
speakers in a symposium on the New
Rules for Civil Procedure for the Fed-
eral Courts, arranged by the Bar
Associations of New York City.
The speakers are all members of
the United Supreme Court Advisory
Committee which has been engaged
for several years in drafting the new
rules for the federalcourts. These
rules weft into effect throughout the
United States on Sept. 16 of this year.
Try Our Beauticians for
a Modern Hair Style.
Shampoo and Finger Wave
with Lemon Rinse
Mon., Tues. and Wed .. 50c
Thurs., Fri., and Sat... 75c
Haircuts............. 50c
World's Fastest Electric
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R U DOL PH'S
BEAUTY SHOP
611 East Liberty Phone 3083

Hillel To Hold
Forum Tonight
Jewish Youth Problems
Are To Be Discussed
The second in the series of forums
conducted by the Hillel Foundation
on the subject, "Jewish Youth Dis-
cusses Its Problems." and the first in
the series of talks designed to help
answer questions raised in'last week's
student symposium will be held at 81
p.m. today at the Foundation.
Mr. Kenneth Morgan, director of
the Student Religious Association,
will speak on "A Christian Looks At'
Jewish Youth Problems." Follow-
ing his speech, an open discussion
will be held.
The Hillel Players will present their
first play of the season at 3:30 p.m.
today at the Hillel Foundation. It is
a one-act comedy entitled "Bedside
Manner."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
(2) at least 21/2 times as many honor
points as hours and with no mark of
E. (A-4 points, B-3, C-2, D-1,
E-0).
Any student in his first semester
of residence holding rank above that
of freshman may be granted a Certifi-I
cate of Eligibility if he was admitted
to the University in good standing.
V
Eligibility, General. In order to re-
ceive a Certificate of Eligibility a stu-
dent must have earned at least 11
hours of academic credit in the pre-
ceding semester, or 6 hours of aca-
demic credit in the preceding summer
session, with an average of at least
C, and have at least a C average for
his entire academic career.
Unreported grades and grades of
X and I are to be interpreted asE un-
til removed in accordance with
University regulations.
If in the opinion of the Committee
on Student Affairs the X or I cannot
be removed promptly, the paren-
thetically reported grade may be used.
in place of the X or I in computing
the average.
Students otherwise eligible, (1.)
who in the preceding semester or
summer session received less than a
C average, but with' no grade of E, or
grade interpreted as E in the preced-
ing paragraph, or (2.) who carried
less than the required hours specified
in the first paragraph of section V,
may appeal to the Committee on
Student Affairs for special permis-
sion.
NI.
Special StuGents. Special students
0.
POSITION
TRAINED SECRETARIES'
IN DEMAND.
Our specialized courses pre-
pare you quickly, pleasantly,
and surely.

are prohibited from participating in'
any public activity except by special
permission of the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs.
VII.
Extramural Activities. Students who
are ineligible to participate in public
activities within the University are
prohibited from taking part in other
activities of a similar nature, except
by special permission of the Commit-
tee on Student Affairs.
VII.
Physical Disability. Students ex-
cused from gymnasium work on ac-
count of physical incapacity are for-
bidden to take part in any public
activity, except by special permission
of the Committee on Student Affairs.
In order to obtain such permission, a
student may in any case be required
to present a written recommendation
from the University Health Service.
IX.
General. Whenever in the opinion of
the Committee on Student Affairs, or
in the opinion of the Dean of the
school or college in which the student
is enrolled, participation in a public
activity may be detrimental to his
college work, the committee may de-
cline to grant a student the privilege
of participation in such activity.
X.
Special Permission. The special per-
mission to participate in public activi-
ties in exception of Rules V, VI, VII,
VIII will be granted by the Commit-
tee on Student Affairs only upon the
positive recommendation of the Dean
of the School or College to which the
student belongs.
XI

ed in becoming members, please see
Mr. Koella, Room 200, Romance Lan-
guage Building, Monday, Tuesday, or
Wednesday from 4 to 5:15. Only stu-
dents with at least five University
Semesters of French, including one
semester in Oral French, or the
equivalent, will be considered.
The following men report at Hill
Auditorium Thursday, October 20,
4:30 to 5:30, for Main Floor assign-
ments:
Arnston, Carl F.
Austin, Warren R.
Boll, Otto R.
Burks, Arthur W.
Busche, Philip C.
Bosma, James F.
Carmack, Marvin
Carrothers, G. H.
Cisco, Herbert D.
Cleverdon, David W.
Coogan, Charles
Currie, Donald H
Danforth, Ralph E.
Dolph, Charles L.
Donald, Johnson C.
Fisher, W. A.
Fheehling, Robert
Gordon, Louis
Hall, Robert F.
Hook, Keith B.
Eutchins, Robert B.
Jensen, Christian T.
Jensen, Thomas A.
Jones, A. Curtis
Kissin, G. H.
Koykka, Raymond
Lahti, P. Theodore
Lentine, Nicholas
Livingston, Gay C.
Magoon, Clair L.
Manley, Robert
Mantele, Kenneth A.
Matson, Frederick R.
Miller, William E.
Morse, Lawrence A.
Nichols, R. H.
Parkinson, William C.

- ~-

w.

SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, 'tap, acrobal
Taught daily. Ter
Garden Studio. Wu(
TheatreBldg. Ph.(
2nd Floor. Opene

Discipline. Cases
these rules will be
proper disciplinary
action.

of violation of
reported to the
authority for

LASTEX FOUNDATI

Styled by

Candidates for Rhodes Scholarships:
Application blanks may be called for
at the History Department Office, 119
Haven Hall.
Sorority 'residents: Please call at
the Offiice of the Dean of Women as
soon as possible for pledge cards
which are to be made out for Pan-
Hellenic and the Dean of Women's
office.
To all sororities: Tickets or money
for the Kampus Kwiz must be turned
in at the League Undergraduate of-
fice on Monday, Oct. 17, between 3
and 5 p.m.

I.r

Pomeroy, Richard W.
Reading, Stuart Andrew
Ritz, Wilfred J.
Roth, Lawrence W.
Schultz, Vic
Sheldon, John L.
Smith, Paul L.
Spencer, John R.
Sprogell, Frank .
Stein, Millard
Stewart, David W.
Nikolay, Turitzin
Wampler, Ben
Weiss, Leo G.
Wyckoff, Paul Wilson
Zimmer, Mike
Additional assignments will
in subsequent bulletins.
Students, Colleg, of Literatur
ence, and the Arts: Because ti
lowing rules are new thise es
dents in our College are as
note them particularly
Only freshmen (students wi
than 24 hours of credit) may
courses without penalty throu
eighth week of the semester. C
(Continued on Page 4)

HICKORY

1I

Enjoy a
FLATTERING
COIFFURE'
Shampoo and Fingerwave
Mon., Tues., and Wed.-50c
RAGGEDY ANN
Shop
1114 S. Univ. Ave. Ph. 7561

A

Cercle Francais: Students interest-

I'

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p..,

}
'' £
_
1
E
f/

ANOTHER

,.-. }
_. '
LG
., 4

by Alexis Carrel;

was

I

$3.50, now ... $1.39
A GENERAL INTRO-
DUCTION to Psycho-
anlysis by Dr. Siegmund.
Freud; was $3.00.
Now .......... $1.39
THE POWER TO LOVE
by Edwin H. Hirsch;,
was $4.00; now .. $1.49
MY COUNTRY AND
MY PEOPLE by Lin
Yutang; was $3.00..
Now ..........$1.39
-next week-
'Gone With The Wind'
present
Best Sellers
ANN LINDBERG -
Listen! The Wind $2.50
RAWLINGS -
The Yearling . . . $2.50
HALSEY - With Malice
Toward Some ... $2.00

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Read Daily

Classified A

1'

J,

f.
¢:

STUDENT

and

FACULTY

11

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The Laura Belle

On Sale Tuesday, Oct.18, On Campus

Shop has-

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