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October 16, 1938 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

students Favor
Open Football
subsidization
(Continued from Page 1)
Marilyn Norris, '41: "While every
college takes ad-
vantage of this prac-
4 tice, more or less,
although I am no
authority on the
subject, I do not be-
lieve that it is at all
conducive to real
American sports-
manship. On the
other hand, some
players who are
really talented should be given a fair
chance to show their ability and at
he' same time receive their just re-
ward.'"
Newton Burroughs, '39: "Inasmuch
is football has become a colorful and
interesting part of
the American col-
lege scene, all-
ieans to encourage
, n d' enhance it.
hould be employed.
By this I mean T
>pen subsidization
n the form of high
chool athletes, e;
preferably in jobs,
raining table, etc.
kbove allblet's eliminate the hypoc-
-Isy and show now rampant in in-
ercollegiate football."
Vincent Dunn, '40: "I certainly do.
Football is a busi-
ness and should be
conducted on a
business basis. If
colleges want good
teams to draw the
crowds, they should
" be more than will-
ing to kick back a
few meals to the
"a :eliows who take the
knocks. The rah-
ah-rah days of do-or-die-for-alma
jater are a thing of' the past. The
3oys won't swallow that bunk anyr
ccre. If you don't take my word for
t, ask them."
Speech Class
To Broadcast

Defendants In America's Biggest Spy Case Since War

DAILY OFFICIAL Attention of Student Chairmen and
BULLETIN Managers is called particularly to
Section II of Rules Governing Par-
ticipation in Public Activities.
SUNDAY, OCT. 16, 1938 Rules Governing Particpation in
VOL. XLIX No. 19 Public Activities.
I.
Notices UParticipation in Public Activities:
To The Members of the University Participation in a public activity is
Senate: There will be a meeting of defined as service of any kind on a
committee or a publication, in a public
the University Senate on Monday, perffirmance or a rehearsal, or in
Oct. 17, at 4:15 p.m. in Room C, Ha- holding office or being a candidate
ven Hall. The agenda for the meet- for office in a class or other student
ing will be: 1 The University build- organization. This list is not intended
ing program and reIatea maters- to be exhaustive, but rierely is indica-
President A. G. Ruthven. 2. Analysis -tive of the character and scope of the
sactivities included.
of University enrollment-Registrar t
I. M. Smith. 3. Report of the Senate Certificate of Eligibility. At the be-
Committee on University Affairs--Dr. ginning of each semester and summer
C. W. Edmunds. session every student shall be con-
Louis A Hopkins, Secretary. clusively presumed to be ineligible for
any public activity until his eligibility
Women Students Attending the is affirmatitely established (a) by
Yale Game: Women students wish- obtaining from the Chairman of the
ing to attend the Yale-Michigan Committee on Student Affairs, in the
football game are required to regis- Office of the Dean of Students, a writ-
ter in the Office of the Dean of Wom- ten Certificate of Eligibility. Partici-
+en. A letter of permission from par- pation before the opening of the first
ents must be received in this office semester must be approved as at any
not later than Wednesday, Oct. 19. other time.
If the student does not go by train, Before permitting any students to
special, permission for another mode participate in a public activity (see
of travel must be included in the definition of Participation above),
tarent's letter. Graduate women the chairman or manager of such

These three men, and a woman, went on trial in New York in America's biggest spy case since the World
War. Left to right are Erich Glaser, 28, a naturalized German, Otto Hermann Voss, 36. also a naturalized
German; and Guenther Gustav Rumrich, 32, Chicago-born son of Austrian parents. Rumrich unexpectedly
changed his previous plea of innocent to ope of guilty. A jury of ten men and two women was quickly selected.

Glee Club Boasts Long Record
Of Success In Varied Activities

Churches Here Start
Two Speech Series
(Continued from Page 1)

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- - - I

----

More than 110,000 miles of travel
bringing the best of the University
to alumni clubs, prospective students
fnd parents, is the record of the
Varsity' Glee Club since its beginnings
in 1846.
In 1850 the young musical group
became a combination stringed instru-
ment and singing group and in 1859
became the present Glee Club. It was
under' Dr. Albert A. Stanley that the
club first. acquired its national repu-
tation and began its series of long
concert trips including trips to Chi-
cago, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Saint
Louis and even Salt Lake City.
Dr. Earl V. Moore followed Dr.,
Stanley, holding the directorship from
1890 to 1913. In 1914, Theodore Harri-
son became director of the club and
under him the trips to the west coast
began. It was during the 1916 trip
that the club was forced to remain in
Los Angeles for some time due to the
severe railroad strike of that year.
By 1928, the club had visited 40
states.
Last year, the club sang in Buffalo,
Rochester, Niagara Falls and other
eastern cities. Record breaking crowds
welcomed the club all along the route.
64Candidates
Seek Posts In
Student Senate

They also were invited to the principlej
cities of Michigan including Saginaw,
Port Huron, Jackson, and to Dear-
born Inn as special guests of Henry
Ford.
This year the concerts include the
opening at Monroe on Nov. 17 followed
by Gary, Culver and South Bend,
Indiana the first of the year. The
annual spring vacation concert tour
for this year will again be through
the east with concerts at Buffalo,
Rochester, Troy, Albany, and pos-
sibly New York City.
The club has also received an invi-
tatidito sing at theNew York World's
Fair in June.
"Trial by Jury," Gilbert and Sulli-
van's comic opera, will be the Club'sj
vaudeville show for this year. The
clubis composed of between 55 and
60 members and is under the direction
of Prof. David Mattern of the School
of Music.
iij

director of music at the First Metlo-
dist Church.
A discussion by the student class
at Stalker Hll will be held at 9:45
a.m. following the speech of Prof.
W. Carl Rufus who will talk cn "The
Religions of Mankind." Prof. Rufus
is a three time globe-trotter and will
give examples to support his belief
that this is a religious world. Evi-
dences of the determining effect of
religion on the different races of the
world will be pointed out as actualiy I
seen by Prof. Rufus in fifty foreigq
countries.
Kenneth Morgan, director of the
Student Religious Association will ad-
dress the Wesleyan Guild at 6 p m. on
the timely subject "The Power of
Persuasion." Two points especially
to be stressed by Mr. Morgan will be
the difference between persuasion
backed by physical strength and per-
suasion that is open and above-board.I

take pictures

on

EVENING RADIOI
PROGRAMS

30 Sjudents To Take Part
In WeeklyProgram
A radio class in drama and diction
is being conducted by Prof. G. E.
Densmore of the speech department,
each Wednesday, from Oct. 12 to
April 5 over station WJR.
For the third successive year, the
microphone is being taken into the
classroom in order that the discussion
of the day's assignment may be car-
ried to listeners. Although these
classroom discussions are put on the
air, t.hey are not essentially "broad-
casts" as the term implies. The reci-
tations and discussions that take'
dlace in the classroom, while pre-
pared for the day's assignment, are
not prepared and rehearsed for
broadcasting.
The radio class is limited to 30 and
are chosen by Professor Densmore so
that different sections of the country
are represented and their pronuncia-
tons noted.
Theatre Issues Call
For #Local 'Jitterbugs'
Attention you "jitterbugs"!
Next Friday Oct. 21, the Michigain
Theatre will award prizes to the win-,
ners of a swing dance contest held at,
a special midnight show. Local win-}
ners will be given an opportunity to1
go to the state finals at Kalamazoo,
where they will compete against the
winners of other contests sponsored
by Butterfield theatres in 15 Michi-
gan cities.
Couples wishing to enter the com-
petition may register at the box-
office of the theatre. Two separate
eliminations will be held next Friday
riight, one to choose the best white
"swingers," the other to ick the
outstanding Negro team.
VanderVelde To Address
Pontiac Women's Club
The Pontiac Women's Club will hear
Pr'of. Lewis G. VanderVelde, director
of Michigan Historical Collections in
a talk on Michigan's history next
Monday at their annual Michigan
program which is to be held in the
Rackham School.

'I

FOR A
POSITION
WITH A
FUTURE

PHOTOGRAPHY is fascinat-
ing. A click of the camera,
and a permanent record is
made. Your best girl - a
football.game - "just some
of the boys" - all would be
excellent subjects.
We carry a complete line of
Cameras and Canera
Supplies.
Ou
,. % cor
exp
sat
FRANCISCO

(Continued from Page 4)
field, Grad., Alberta Wood, '40, Lib-
eral.
Harry L. Sonneborn, '40, Ethel Q.
Norberg, '40, Jean Maxtead, Edward
J. Htuchins, -'40, Progressive Coali-
tion; Waldo Abbott, Jr.,. '39, Conser-
vative Liberal; Carl D. Wheeler, '41E,
Conservative, Ted Grace, Jr., '39,
James W. Grace, '40, John G. Good-
ell, '40, Walter F Stebbins, '40, Paul
A. Johnson, '41E, Malcolm E. Long,
'40, James MacDonald, '40, Conser-
vatives; Alexis M. Anikeeff, '40, Mich-
igan Liberal; Hugh H. Estes, '40E;
Robert Prasil, '41; Abraham J. Good-
man, '41, Independent Liberal; Frank
W. Bussard, '40; William M. Kramer,
'41, Liberal; Betty Sorensen, '39;
John M. Mulkey, 40E, Liberal; D.
Philip Clark, '39; Phil Whittemore,
'39E; Leon A. Kupeck, '39, Indepen-
dent; Roland Rhead, '40, Liberal.
Morris Lichtenstein, '39 Co-op; Bud
Gerson, '40; William F. Grier, '39;
John R. Hulbert, '40; Robert O. Bush,
'41; William Gram. '4.1, Equity; James
R. Frankel, '41; Irving B. Gerson, '40;
Jack Cooper, '40; Edward Macal, '39,
Fraternity Liberal; Jack C. Sullivan,
'39; Peter Carter, '40; Non-Partisan;
Ben. F. Munn, John Canavan, '40.
co PROFESSIONAL
E T EEPINTEN

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WJR
The Silver Theatre
The Laugh Liner
The People's Platform
Passing Parade
Mercury Theatre
Ford Sunday Evening Hour
To be announced
The Hermit's Cave
News
Henry King's Orchestra
Ted Weems Orchestra
WWJ
Catholic Hour
C C. Bradner
Jello Program
Fitch Band Wagon
Charley McCarthy
Manhattan Merry-Go-Round
American Album of Familiar Music
Horace Hedt
NBC Feature
News and Music
Weather, Scores
CKLW
What Price Loyalty?
Show Of The Week
Sport Commentator
Dick Barrie's Orchestra
Bach Cantata Series
Say It With Words
Old Fashioned Revival
The Goodwill Hour
The Canadian Club Reporter
Serenade in Waltz Time
Jerry Blane's Orchestra
Bob Crosby's Orchestra
WXYZ
Eduard werner Orchestra
Boredom by Budd
Popular Classics
Sunday Night at Seth Parkers
Spy at Large
Songs We Remember
Hollywood Playhouse
Walter Winchell
Donald Novis Sings
Cheerio
PressrBulletins
Abe Lyman Orchestra
Maurie Baker's Orchestra
Earl Hines Orchestra

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LAI

A Corona portable type-
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