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March 02, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-03-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MA

Baker Explaifis
News Writing

Tells
For

Students Of Need
Precise Reporting

Accurate and well-documented re-
porting is the prime requisite for the
reporter of scientific news, R. Ray
Baker, associate editor of the Ann Ar-
bor News, informed students yester-
day afternoon at a meeting sponsred
by the school of journalism in Haven
Hall. He declared it was a "crime to
write science in a haphazard man-
ner."
The interest of the average news-
paper reader in the experiments of
science, in the opinion of Mr. Baker,
-has created a need for a ispecialized
reporter. The scientific reporter has
become a medium between the lay
public and the scientist, he added.
The writer must interpret the tech-
nical phrases of the scientist Into
simple intelligible language, said Mr.
Baker, a special writer for the- Booth
newspaper chain. He described his
technique for the compiling, and in-
terpreting of scientific news. He
stressed the need for extreme care in
preparation of material which he al-
ways asks the scientist to check be-
fore pnblication. He suggested the
use of analogy and metaphors as use-
ful language tools to make clear the
meaning.

Contract Violations
Contributing Cause
of iHearst Strike
(Continued fromh Page 1)
labor groups, farmers and workmen,
and the growth of racial hatred all
result from this economic problem, he
stated. A labor movement powerful
enough to secure increased production
and thus alleviate 'cut-throat com-
petition for lobs, he concluded, would
automatically lessen these other con-
flicts.
Tracing the history of the news-
paper union which began in 1933
Weeks showed the gradual identifica-
tion of newspaper workers with the1
cause of organized labor in all fields.
The Guild, at first an independent or-
ganization, became affiliated with the
AFL and later -with the CIO. The
group has grown in strength and now
has a membership of approximately
18,000.
The CIO is the largest organized
group working for progressivism in the
country, he concluded. In addition to
concerning itself with the problems
directly concerning labor such :as
sanctity of contract, maintainance of
a stable wage scale, prevention of lay-
offs and defense of the Wagner La-
bor Relations act, it is also active in
promoting the cause of civil liberties1
and public health and lobbying for
increased relief appropriations, he
stated.

Soprano To Be Featured Artist
On ProgramOfMay Festival

Classified Directory

"An American beauty, both as re-
gards person and vocal endowment.
She has skyrocketed to fame in grand
opera, in the concert field, over the
radio, and in sound films."
This is the way a recent music
critic spoke of Gladys Swarthout,
mezzo-soprano, who makes her first
vocal appearance this year as one of
the featured artists on the May Fes-
tival program.
Miss Swarthout, who is as noted
for her beauty as well as her voice,
and who was also recently selected
one of America's best-dressed wo-
men, has been a featured star of the
Metropolitan Opera Company for
the past eight seasons. Among her
major roles have been: "Mignon,"
Niejata in "Sadko," Guilietta in "The
Tales of Hoffman," Adalgisa in "Nor-
ma," Preziosilla in "Forza del Des-
tino," Mrs, Dean in "Peter Ibbet-
son," Pierrotto in "Linda di Cha-
mounix," and La Cieca in "La Gio-
conda."
She has also met with outstanding
success in concert solo work and each
season fills as many recital engage-
ments as her other activities will
permit. Motion pictures too have
recognized this gifted artist's many
abilities and, in 'the past four years,
she has starred in four Paramount
sound films, "Rose of the Rancho,"
"Give Us This Night," "Champagne
Waltz," and "Romance in the Dark."
Miss Swarthout has been the star
of several radio programs and has
appeared as guest star on innumer-
able others.
Professor Dickinson
Stresses Problems
Of Minimum Wages
(Continued from Page 1)
out. "The woolen and worsted indus-
try is still localized chiefly in north-
ern states, but its members are appre-
hensive of further migration South-
ward, partly by means of increasing
woolen and worsted operations in
southern cotton mills. Only about 5
per cent of the workers in the wool-
en and worsted industry proper re-
ceive less than 35 cents an hour, but
nearly 50 per cent of the wage earn-
ers in the cotton goods industry
make earnings below the 35-cent
mark.
"It remains to be seen," Professor
Dickinson added, "what minimum
wage or wages will be established
in the cotton mills but presumably
will be lower 4han 36-cents; and if
the latter rate is applied to the
woolen and worsted industry, then
regulations will have to be worked
out with reference to 'mixtures of
fibres.
"The manufacturer members of
the committee, however, thought that
if the minimum wages were only a
few cents different in the two lead-
ing textile industries, there would be
few difficulties by reason of blended
fabrics," Professor "Dickinson said.
"Supposing that a minimum should

LEARN
TO DANCE
Social Dancing. taught'
daily. "Terrace 'Garden
Dancing Studio,Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695
Second Floor
WANTED -- TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. 5th Avenue. Phone 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79
TYPING-Reasonable rates. L. M.
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Summer should be reserved now. Phone or come in, choosw
your s*hip & a small deposit will guarantee the space. If you fand.
yeucannot go.t willgladlgarrange for a Transfereora full return
of deposit money. . All details completed here. without chin ye.
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IKUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU, 601 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor
DAILY 2 - 4 - 7 - 9 P.M.
NOW - TODAY and FRIDAY!
LOVE ON A TERROR SNIP
ABLAZEWITH RED DOOMi
Raw drama!...
Three against
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GLADYS SWARTHOUT

Heywood, 414 Maynard St., phone
5689. 271
LOST
LOST--In vicinity of League. Brown
hat with black band. Initialed
W.M.M. Phone 5017. Bill Mills. Re-
ward in heaven. 427
LOST-Round, yellow gold, woman's
Hamilton wrist watch, black band.
Sentimental value. Reward. Edith
Leveene, Jordan Hall. 424
LOST-8 by 11% black pharmacy
notebook." Call 4119.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Wolverine skin rug,
large, fine, decorative trophy.
$25.00. Write Box 332, Birmingham,
Mich. 428

Colby Lecture.
Cites Changing,
Land Policies
The shift of a great part of the
population of the Nation to urban
centers has created a need for edu-
cation and training so that we may
formulate a new national economy.
to deal more effectively with modern
land problems, Prof. Charles C. Colby
'of the University of Chicago said in
a University Lecturetyesterday in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Professor Colby, geographical ad-
viser to the Tennessee Valley Auth-
ority, traced the histories of land
policies in this country sfrom the
times of the pioneers when it was
first decided to carry on a policy of
individual ownership. In the course
of years, he pointed out, land ac-
quisition, the South's land use sys-
tem for cotton crops and the settle-
ment of the West each took their
turn.
After the World War, speculation
in land was rife, he said, and conse-
quently land values were forced up
too high. The farmer, even in the
years just prior to 1929, was not
prosperous. Professor Colby described
the efforts, in part, of the TVA to
better the land conditions that have
presented themselves.
With the help of greater integra-
tion, he concluded, we -shall be able
to perfect a better econQny to deal
with land conditions in accordance
with the best traditions and ideals
of our country.
be established for cotton goods of
32% cents per hour, the wage struc-
ture in cotton goods would be more
profgundly affected than vwould the
woolen and worsted industry by a{
36-cent minimum; moreover, the lat-
ter industry would be less apprehen-
sive than at present of competition
from cotton mills with reference to+
woolen fibres."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

THURSDAY, MARCH 2, 1939
VOL. XLIX. No. 107
Notices
To University Employees in Ad-
ministrative. Secretarial, Stenograph-
ic, Clerical and Similar Positions:
The Business Office desires to know;
what individuals would be desirous of
participating should the Regents find
it possible to open to employees of'
the above classifications the oppor-
tunity to purchase old-age annui-
ties on exactly the same terms and
conditions that they are now pur-
chased by members of the academic'
faculty. These terms and conditions
are, in brief, the payment by the in-
dividual of 5 per cent of his or her
annual compensation as premium up-
on an old-age annuity with addi-
tional, equal payment by the Univer-
sity for the same purpose. In all
cases premium payments by the
University as well as premium pay-
ments by the individual, plus inter-
est, are the permanent possession of
the individual under the terms of the
contract with the Teachers Insurance
and Annuity Association. In case of
death before reaching retirement age
all accumulations go into the estate;
of the individual.
It should not be understood that
this offer is being made to employees;
the purpose of this notice is, rather,;
to find out how many would take
advantage of the offer if made and
thus to know whether the plan is de-
sired, and if so to enable an esti-
mate of the cost of putting the plan
into operation,eif decided upon.
Cards have been prepared and are
available in the offices of the Deans,
and other principal University of-
fices, on which interested employees
may file, in the Business Office, by
Campus mail. or otherwise, their de-
sire to participate in -such a plan if
established. Replies are desired by
the Business Office not later than
Feb. 28, 1939.
Shirley W. Smith.
Engineering and East Engineering
Libraries: Beginning March 4 and on
every Saturday thereafter for the du-
ration of the second semester the
libraries will be open from 1-5 p.m.
in addition to the schedule previously
maintained. Funds for this purpose
have been made available by the En-
gineering Council.
Marsh and Mandelbaum Scholar-
ships for 1939-1940.
Students in the Literary College
may now file applications for the
above scholarships, on blanks to be
obtained fromnthe office of the Dean
of the College; 1210 Angell Hall. All
applications must be returned to the
same office on or before March 31.
Awards will be announced in April or
May.
For the photographs required, eith-
er a snapshot or a duplicate of that
attached to the student identification
card may be used.
The Marsh Scholarships have re-
cently carried stipends of $&0 or $75.
The Mandelbaum Scholarships, of

which three are awarded to n
dents in the Literary Colleg
stipends of about $400. Th
arships here named are restr
those who are students of the
College only, and in awardin
consideration is given to ch
need of financial assistanc
scholarship, in the order na
Owing to the limited am
funds available, awards und
scholarships are normally
only to students whose en
in the college has exceeded o
Deviations from this are ma
in very exceptional instances
Fraternity and Sorority Pr

men stu-

e, carry and Scholarship Blanks are due in
rie schol-
ited o- the Office of the Dean of Students on
Literary _____
ig them Bronson-Thomas Prize in' German.
iaracter' Value $40.00. Open to all undergrad-
ce, and uate students in German of distinctly
med. fAmerican training. Will be awarded
count of on the results of a three-hour essay
er these competition to be held under depart-
granted mental supervision in the latter half
rollment of March, 1939 (exact date to be an-
ne year, nounced two weeks in advance).
Lde only Contestants must satisfy the Depart-
me.-t that they have done their read-
ing in German. The essay may be
residents (conatinueed on Page 4)

U

are reminded that the Membership

ART CINEMA LEAGUE presents
" Awork of Artu ncompromising and beau tif ui
in its stirring Realismi." --NEW YORK POST
The Childhood -of
"Pozerfld" - "Colorful" "-FasC iiat iiis
~rai ilng" -- udag iie~it
-say It NEW YORK FILM CRITICS
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE -8:15 P.M.
Thursday - Friday - Saturday
March 2a3-4
Seats Reserved

' '

~~~~

LAUNDRIES

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9

MISCELLANEOUS

WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company, Phone 7112. 17
CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 S.
Main. 311
HOME DECORATORS-Decorating,
painting. Budget plan if desired.
Dial 7209. 181
WANTED-Clothing wanted to buy.
S u i t s, overcoats, typewriters,
watches. Sam pays the most. Phone
6804 for appointment. 388

MARSHALL CUT-RATE

k

THE MICHIGAN:DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES

PHONE 5933 - 9242

231 South State-at the head of Liberty St.

FREE DELIVERY

Prices Effective Thursday, March 2 and Friday, March 3

Effective as of February 14, 1939

EXTRA -
POPULAR SCIENCE
Correspondence School
NEWS
Coming aturday
"Duke of West Point"

CASH ONLY!
12c per reading line (on basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
We have a Quick Delivery Serv-
ice at your disposal if you wish to
have your ad picked up (10c
extra).
For further information call
:23-4-1 or stop in at 420 Maynard
Street.

Regular 15c
CIGARETTES
$1.15 ctn.
plus tax
5Q Pad
Matches 8c
2 for 15c

$1.25

BRIGGS

Pound
TOBACCO
SPECIALS

$7i

98C
.00 HALF & HALF.
59c

130 Ponds Cleansing
TISSUES
6c
500 Kleenex
28c
COSMETIC SPECIALS
83c PONDS CREAMS
39c

II - - - - - -

I.)

,.

4 (

le

Men!

Drug Savings!
Qt. Milk of Magnesia
49C _
Gal. Mineral Oil
$1.59
50c Dr. Lyons-
TOOTH POWDER
50c Phillips
TOOTH PASTE
29

90c UNION LEADER
49c

$1.38
Lady Esther
98c

OUR FRIENDLY
SERVICE

Cream

We now have a complete
stock of SLACKS. All spring
patterns and colors. You will
be glad to note the quality and

Postage stamps at cost
We'll cash your checks
Free Delivery Service
Phones ,
5933 - 9242
100 Genuine

Large
Vaseline Hair Tonic
63c
lOc Cashmere Bouquet
SOAP
2 for17c
Oc Sweetheart
oap ... 4c
-Feminine Requisites-

. this telephone idea can help you
HILE you're in college, you're on the consumer
side of the fence. There you'll find the "Where-
to Buy It" section of your Telephone Directory a
quick, easy way to discover who sells what you want.
After graduation, you may be on the other side of
the fence, too-the seller's side. As a manufacturer or
distributor of an advertisead product you will find clas-
sified telephone directory listings a most effective and
economical vay to direct buyers to the dealers han.
iling your product.
This directory service, tying tip the. national adver-
a- - .1et -&L - I.- ' -* - :. . O'1- - ._ w1-- - - --

equally glad to note

the price.

$ 295
UP

50c MOLLE 29C
50c BURMA SHAVE

5-grain
ASPIRIN

DOZEN KOTEX.
48 KOTEX ...

20c
75c

Am

., :

MaINUTANCK" I -

11

11

I

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