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May 04, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1939

TI. E MICHIGA N DAILY

HREE

Adult Education
Institute Hears
Prof. Pollock
Paul McNutt Is Seeking
Demnocratic Nomination,
Prof. Cuncannon Says
(Continued from Page 1)
done well in the Philippines. Mc-
Nutt's backers place faith in the old
army proverb that "there's luck at
Manilla," he asserted.
Opening the morning session, Mrs.
Emma Fox conducted the second of
her series on Parliamentary Law,
-Mrs. Fox is state parliamentarian of
the Michigan State Federation of
Women's Clubs. Mrs. John L.
Sweetnam, first vice-president of the
Federation, presided at the morning
lectures.
. In the second lecture of the Adult
Education Series, Prof. Waldo Abbot,
director of the Broadcasting Service,
declared that education by radio can-
not displace classroom teaching.
Teacher's Personality Essential
The personality of the teacher is
essential to the learner, as well as the
mere voice, he continued. He point-
ed out that of the five types of broad-
casting-long wave, facsimile, tele-
vision, short wave and ultra-high fre-
quency, only the first can be dissem-
inated over a wide area, all the others
having waves that go straight out in-
to space, rather than reflecting from
the Heavyside Layer as do the long-
wave broadcasts. This necessitates
a very fine receiving set, and the
broadcasting stations must come
near each other.
In relation to education on the
long-wave broadcasts, he said that
the networks were doing all they
could to further educative programs,
but that as soon as a sustaining pro-
gram became popular, a commercial
sponsor bought the time and at-
tempted to mold the opinions of the
speakers.
Professor Abbot said that among
the most popular of the broadcasts of
the University through station WJR
were, in order, health talks, talks on
domestic welfare, mental hygiene, re-
ligion, vocation selection and litera-
ture. He closed with a request for
suggestions for subjects for next year's
series.
Speaking on "Highlights in Cur-
rent Biography," the third talk of
the Literature Series, Miss Edith
Thomas of the Library Extension
Service stressed that the subjects of
this year's biographies are "rooted in
the soil of early America." Their
authors, she said, portray simple,
homely memories of American life.
Outstanding Works Selected
Miss Thomas' selection of outstand-
ing works included: "Benjamin
Franklin," by Carl Van Doren, "A
Puritan in Babylon," by William Allen
White, "The Education of an Ameri-
can," by Mark Sullivan, "Peculiar
Treasure," by Edna Ferber, "Sailor
on Horseback," by Jack London, "All
in a Day's Work," by Ida Tarbell and
"The Autobiography of William Lyon
Phelps."
The program for today includes:
Parliamentary Law Series, Mrs. Em-
ma Fox, at 8 a.m.; Adult Education
Series, "Adult Education-a Com-
munity Responsibility," Prof. Howard
Y. McClusky of the education school,
at 9; Music and Arts Series, the
second lecture on "The Art of Lis-
tening to Music," Prof. Glenn D.
McGeoch of the Music School,' at
10; Literature Series, "The Best
Novels of 1939," Olive Deane Hormel
of the Extension Service, at 11.
The afternoon lectures are Inter-
national Relations Series, "England
Since Munich," Prof. Dwight L, Du-
mond of the history department, at

2 pam.; Contemporary American
I'igures, "Arthur H. Vandenberg,"
Prof. Paul M. Cuncannon of the po-
litical science depRatment, at 3.
Visitors to the Institute will at-
tend the banquet commemorating the
Tenth Anniversary of the opening of
the League at 6 p.m. in the League
Ballroom, and will hear the address'
of Dr. Walter H. Judd, medical mis-
sionary to China, at an open meet-
ing at 8:15 in the Rackham Suild-
ing.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued on Page 3)
o'clock. Students will meet in the
auditorium of the University High
School. The examination will con-
sume about four hours' time; prompt-
ness is therefore essential.
Student Loans: The Loan Commit-
tee will meet on Tuesday afternoon,
May 9, to consider loans for the Sum-
mer Session and the year 1939-40. Ap-
plications must be filed for this meet-
ing on or before May 5.
Union Life Membership Button. All
men who have been enrolled in. the
University for eight semesters may
secure their life membership buttons
at the business office of the Union
any week-day from 8 to 12 and 1:30

Fresh Air Camp Tag Day Volunteers
(Continued from Page 2)

7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:00
11:00-12:30

S. UNIVERSITY AND WASHTENAW
James Tobin.
Lucille Faun, Lee Carey, Jack Meyer.
Jean Brown. Robert Hotchkiss.
Dekle Taylor.
Dottie Barrett.
Ted Spangler.
Anne Thurston, Verna Boyd.
Joe Reed.
Janet Vander Heidt, Jack Bensley.
Virginia Schwegler, Lee Perry.
Mildred Yoxall.

12:00-
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LEAGUE
Esther Baker, Blaz Lucas.
Doris Sott, Betty Bricker, Leo Federman.
1 Jane Anderson, Janet Sargent, Bernie Sisman.
Pete Brown.
Helen McCrae.
Bob Morrison.
Yvonne Westrate, Joan Lynch.
Lloyd Mowery.
Elizabeth gibber, Betty Farrell, Bob Crane.
Anne Kingston, Gerry Wilson, Paul Smith.
Virginia Mulholland, Meb Leach, Dick Martin.
ANGELL HALL - NORTH ENTRANCE
Dorothy Hale, Bill Newman.
Alys Pierce, Nancy Seibert, Paul Johnson.
Margaret Cram, Florence Brotherton, Bill Bavinger.
Jack Blackburn.
Harriet Sharkey.
Charles Jacobson.
Roberta Leete.
Mike Meisel.
Ruth Chatard, Ed Mack, Clare Louis Fulde.
Barb Paterson, Newt Ketchum.
Margaret Carr.
BENCH BETWEEN HAVEN AND ANGELL HALLS
Lois Fenn.
Lee Burleson, Helen Prockiu.
Margaret Bidlock.
Lois Baxter, Abe Plas.
Betty Ann Armstrong, Woodrow Frailing.
Lynda Nickl, Thaula Copeland, Bill aJckson.
Dorothy Ann Caughey, Dave Rice.
Bebee Ross.
KRIESGE'S
Jim Wills, Donna Miles.
Andy Ashburn, Ann Wills, Betty Roosa.
Harry Howell, Francelle Martin.
Brad Heyl.
Betty J. Pence.
Ruth Laing, Dorothy Turner.
IDave Cushing.
Ganson Taggart.
Norm Kewley, Eleanor Donahue, Naomi Gans.
Joe Kennicot, Elaine Bergers.
William Simon, Elinor Kirkpatrick.
MUSEUM
Bob Titus, Ann Dredge.
Betty Slee, Betty Gross, Al Darling.
Betty Lombard, Norm Call.
Ed Tripp.
Claire-Ree Hill.
Ellen Kreighoff, Lois Gish.
$ill Stain.
I1ank Fielding.
Keith Yoder, Wilma Cope, Doris Cuthbert.
Chuck Hall, Mary Blacklock, Bunny Hvistendahl.
Winnifred McAllister.
ARCHITECTURAL MALL.
Chuck Evans, Frances Huntington.
Sam Perry, Betty Rouse, Shirley Saperteis.
Marshall Rogers, Peg Pulte.
Dwight Adams.
Lou Ann Perry.
Roma Head, Mildred Curtis.
Phil Whittemore, Martin Brown.
Dick Lord.
Bob Mitchell. Barbara Fisher, Barbara Taft.
Hank McDonald, Shirley Toddt.
Anne Wehner.
LAW SCHOOL
Ed Biggar, Jean Thompson.
Grace Jones, Katherine Reisenberger, Richard Hinks.
John Donnelly, Erma Erlewine.
Charles Delbridge.
Frances Haskins.
John Adams, Ed Devine.
Naicy Urmston, Mary J. Phelps.
Harrison Church.
Betty Badger, Lorain Mantler.
(Continued on Page 8)

_
_

7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:O0
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12:30- 2:00
1 :00- 1:00
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7:45- 9:00
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_,

.im'
m

No. 1 man among the Nazis in
Danzig is Albert Forster (above),
who's long been an admirer of Hit-
ler. Forster heads group agitating
for Danzig's return to Germany.

Rioting, which caused Police Chief George 0. Kenney, of Everett, Mass., to request "all cities and towns" in
the state to send "men and equipment immediately," broke out in the week-old seamens' strike. Pickets and
onlookers are shown dashing for fresh air as tear gas bombs exploded in their midst. Police (at right) had
thrown the tear gas to disperse the gathering. The disturbance lasted' 15 minutes.

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Unbroken line of this map indi-
cates the course that Brig. Gen.
Vladimir Konstantinovich Kokkin-
aki, ace Soviet flier, expected to
take on his non-stop flight from
Moscow to New York. Kokkinaki
was forced down in Labrador.

-j

Giving this guest a cold shoulder, Camille Novellino surveys the parlor of a Brooklyn home, wreckedwhen
a huge truck ran afoul of a fire engine and crashed through.

12:30-
12:00-
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2:00-
3:00-
4:00-

2:00
1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00

7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:00
11:00-12:30
12:00- 1:00
12:30- 2:00
1:0- 2:00
2:00- 3:00

Royal ears will hear the sound
of Jean Tennyson's voice when the
lovely Chicago Opera soprano sings
for visiting Crown Prince Olaf and
Princess Martha of Norway.

ND HER A CARD on Mother's Day, Sunday, May 14,
and choose it from our large, complete stock of cards.
Priced from 5c to 35c
xe MAYER-SCIAIRER Compuy
112 South Main Street Phone 4515
Stationers, Printers, Binders
Office Outfitters
I " I1 - ... .

Views of NYA project for 200 unemployed young men at Cassidy Lake, near Chelsea, Mich. Upper left, two
youths are shown putting the finishing touches to wooden filing cabinets. Upper right, work on a metal lathe.
Center, a corriespondence class in American history working on essays that will be corrected by the Extension
Service here at the University.

Hit-happy Bernard McCosky
(above), Detroit Tigers center field-
er, took No. 1 hitting honors away
from Hank Greenberg in a recent
count on American League batters.

USED BOOK SALE
Spoisorcd by
U. of M. Alumni
hn aid of scholarships
Prices...icandup
I 4A I I,'- 17 L ITFT I

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