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May 04, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-05-04

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rwo

THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1939

-a

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wier Inian Rites Reveale 1d
In Emneneau' s Motioni Picture

Fresh Air Camp Tag Day Volunteers
Volunteers are reminded to arrive at their assigned positions promptly.
Please do not leave your post until the next volunteer has arrived. If he is
late or does not appear, take your container to the nearest post and leave
it with a volunteer there. The last person assigned to each post is responsible
for taking the container to Lane Hall.

Weird rites In which Indian fanat-
'les danced smilingly over burning
oels, Icrced long neecdles through
their bodies and whipped themselves
With long hooked knives provided the
mnajor portion of a motion picture lec-
ture by Dr. Murray B. Emeneau of
Yale: University yesterday afternoon
il* the amphitheatre of the Rackham
building.
The firewalking ceremony was par-
ticularly interesting, Dr. Emeneau
declared, because the firewalkers, ex-
amhined before and after crossing the
trertob of red -hot coals, showed no
signs of burning or blistering. Once
havirw cro'<ed the coais, these fan-
atics were nrdmred possessed by the
god'M spirit. The people, to show their
reveren ce, "stuffed bananas in the
firewalkers' mouths."
Dr. Emeneau pointed out that al-

though the Indians, seemed to belabor
themselves oseverely with the -long
hooked knives, they were little in-
jured. This was attributed, he said,
to the shap~e of the kivies which fit-
ted the contours of their ribs. This
ceremony was part of a larger one in
which the people, by inflicting self-
torture sought to absolve themselves
of their sins.
Mahatma Gandhi, Dr. Emeneau
stated, has been responsible for break-
ing downi much of the caste systern
in India. Some temples, formerly
open 6thly to the highe castes, are
now attended even by the untouch-
ables.
Dr. Emeaneau, recently returned
from three years research in India,
will speak again at 4:15 .p.m. today
in the amphitheatre of the Rackham
' Building

WATER 0
The taste "speaks" for its purity. fi
Delivered in bottles for fraternity, sorority, or home. fi
Phone 8270
Ce~o o<:'""><-- omo omo o~emoe-yo<::->~e:

7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11 :00-12 :00
11:00-12:30
12:00- 1:00
12:30- 2:00
1:00- 2:00
2:00 3:00
3:00 -4:00
4:00- 5:00
75 9:00
9 :00-10 :00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:00
71:00-12:30
12:00 1:00
12:30- 2:00
1:00- 2:00
2:00- 3:00
3:00- 4:00
4:00- 5:00
7:45- 9:00
9:00-10:00
10:00-11:00
11 :00-12 :30
12:30- 2:00
2:00- 3:00
3:00- 4:00
4:00- 5:00
7:45- 9:00
92:00-1:00
10:00-11:00
11:00-12:00
11:00-1 3 0
12:00- 1:00
12:30- 2:00
1:00-12:00
20:00-13:00
41:00-15:00
11:00-12:30
12 :00-12 :30
12:30- 1:00
12:30- 2:00
1:00- 2:00
2:00 -3:00
3:00- 4:00
4:00- 5:00

CENTER OF DIAGONAL
Mary Frances Browne, Al Andrews, Tim Hird, Bud Benjamin,
Jack Brennan.
Tad Lynch, Peggy May, Hugh Downer, Walt Peckinpaugh,
Pete Lisagor
Betty Kepler, Janet Burns, Bob Emmett, Pete Ipsen, Charles
Kettler, John Mitchell.
Phil Woodwor-th, Horace Gilmore, Leon Kupeck-.
Virginia Brerton, Frances Desancon.
Don Van Loon, Albert Mayio.
Mary Tichenor, Betty Mandel, Eleanor Sevison.
Dick Tarbell, Les Hillberg, Leo Beebe
Betty Brooks, Margaret Ford, Walt Rodgers, Bob Hartwell.
Freda Vander Veen, Mary Storr, Leon Kupeck, Walter Hook,
Frank Morgan.
Ann Hall. Phyllis Sandercook, Harold Spoden.
NORTH END OF DIAGONAL
Joan Outhwaite, Stan Swinton.
Brabara Grill, Betty Reutter, Larry Van den Berg.
Marian Ferguson, Dick Humphries.
Don Treadwell.
Shirley Silver.
Dennis Flanagan.
Maya Gruzhit,.
Ellot Marnis
Janet Skeles Hortense Smith, Paul Park.
Ellen Was, Dye Hogan.
Sonia Yanosky, Gus Dannemiller.
ENGINEERING ARCH
Dorothy Schatzky, Red Zittle.
Betty Baldwin, Virginia Alfvin, Gordon Andrew.,
Edna Kearney, Ruth Hatfield, John O'Hara.
Jane Jewitt. Bob Morgan.
SBetty Wibel, Jullan Griggs.
Dotsy Baxter, Alberta Wood, Stuart Low.
Cletus Hall, Bob May.
Jean Bourg, Bob May.
ROMANCE LANGUAGES
Betty Clark, Goff Smith.
Sarah Jen Hak, Har Hoferkamp, Edwin Middleton.
Mary Hokn Chre obs
Stewart Peck.
Henrietta Simpson.
Wesley Powers.
Carolyn Foule, Pat Hughes, Ed Lebeis.
Mary Van Welde.
SOUTH UNIVERSITY AND TAPPAN
Ruth Pollack, Foster Campbell.
Evelyn Brown, Ben Kamberg.
Virginia Hoelzel; Martin Gurwin.
Murray Kamrass.
Mary Lavan.
Robert Sandberg.
Hung Wongr.
Madeline Krieghoff.
David Panar.
Peggy Cornelius, David Margold.
Frances Nevin, William Strauch.
Helen Bricker.
(Continued on Page 3)

4

Ten Reasons Why College Students
Make Money Selling Fuller Brushes
1. Everybody needs and uses brushes every day of their lives. "Head
to foot - cellar to attic."
2. Fuller Products are guaranteed, trade marked, staple necessities.
3. Fuller men represent the largest house of its kind in the world.
Their methods and products must be right.
4. Fuller's 98 necessities, recently' drastically reduced, are priced from
25c to $3.95. Pr'ice range fits everybody's pocketbook. Sales for 1938
were $12,625,000.
5. Fuller, in 32 years, has spent millions of dollars in advertising _-
Fuller dealers cash in on this. Ask your neighbor's opinion of Fuller
quality and service.
6. A free brush given on each call makes Fuller men welcome in
inillions of homes. Appointment system.
8. Fuller men daily receive orders from .over 50% of their calls.
Q. "As long as there. is dust and dirt, brushes are rieeded."
10. Fuller dealers are in business for themselves. Restricted territory
rights.
COMPLE TE, ACCURA TE FACTS COVERING
YOUR OPPORTUNITY GLADLY GIVEN RELIABLE
STUDENTS-MICHIGAN UNION 2 TO 4 FRIDAY P.M., MAY 5

gDAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1939
VOL. XLIX. No. 153
Notics
Army Flying -Cadet Board is at
R.O.T.C. Headquarters. It will re-
ceive applications from any students
who will have completed one-half
or more of the necessary credits for
a degree by the end of this academlic
year. No application will be received
unless submitted before 5 p.m. Thurs-
day, May 4. The Board will inter-
view students at R.O.T.C. Headquar-
ters at any time from 8:30 a.m. to
5 p.m.
Residence Halls for Men: Student
personnel positions. Men students
who will be studying for advanced
degrees (in professional schools or in
the Graduate School), and who wish
to apply for positions as Proctors in
the Residence Halls during the year*
1939-1940, may obtain application
blanks in the Office of the Director
of Residence Halls, 208 Angell Hall.
A limited number of applications will
be accepted from students who will
be seniors during 1939-1940; but sen-
pointent only unde exceptional cir-
cumstances.
Students who have already made
application will please come to this
office to arrange for interviews.
I should like to transact all busi-
ness connected with Proctoirships be-
twen 2:30 and 4:0, Monday through
applicants would call in person dur-
ing these hours. Those who aire un-
able to do so may phone 4121, Exten-
sion 2129, to arrange for appoint-
metKarl Litzenbrg, 208 Angell Hall
University Council. There will be a
meeting of the University Council
on Monday, May 8, at 4:15 p.m. in
Room 1009 Angell Hall.
Agenda:-
Report of the University Commit-
tee on Theatre Policy and Practice-
J. A. Bursley.
Report of the Committee on
University Lectures--L.M. Eich.
Report of the Committee on Co-
operation with Educational Institu-
tions--E.V. Moore.
Report of the Committee for the
Bureau of Appointments and Occu-
pational Information--G. E. Myers.
Report of the Committee son Cor-
respondence Courses-W. G. Rice.
Subjects Offered by Members of
the Council.
tReports of the Standing Commit-
Program and Policy--Edmonson.
FITISING
MISCELLANEOUS
WASHED SAND and Gravel, Drive-
way gravel, washed pebbles. Killins
Gravel Company. Phone 7112. 17
CASH PAID for your discarded
clothing. Claude Brown, 512 5.
Main. 311
HOME DECORATORS--Decorating,
paining.Budget plan if desired.
S TE A MS H I P
Tour steamshn passage to Erope.for thi Corning Epring- d
Eumme, hol e reseraed o. oe r me In , e
.'Personal Service- oa eerg boohiag ulnce 191. P11. 841.?
KUE8LeR TRAVL SUREAU. 601 E iluroa CL. n Aror

SHOWS at 2 -4 - 7-9 P.M.
-Now Playiug
for its startling
story of women
without men
for its glao
-e..lxander
K OR DA
presents
CORINNE LUCHAIRE
FfNA RF5RT.RARRY RARNF'

We.Eve.
MICH IGAN T HEATR E ma 1-
Victor Payne Jennings presents
by Mazo de Ia Roche - with Harry Ellerbe
SEATS NOW 55c, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20, $2 75 (Includ. Tax)

Educational Policies-Duffendack.
Student Relations-Vedder.
Public Relations-Allen.
Plant and Equipment-Gram.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary.
Directed Teaching, Qualifying Ex-

Benefit Medical Aid for China
(Chinese Cinema with English Titles)
and STAGE ENTERTAINMENT
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Friday & Saturday Evenings 8:30 .Saturday Matinee 2:30
Tickets 50 cents Telephone 6300

"EN OF MICHIGAN"
Engaged for these / rans- A/ltatic Crossings from
New York to Cherbourg, Soultham p1on ,Ha inbutrg
s.s. DE U T SCILAND - June 22
1{etu rning from Hamburg via Soultham plon,
Cherbourg to New York
s.s. A MB U RG - A ug ust 10
Join Bill McKay and his "Men 'of Michigan" on their cross-
ings to and from Europe for a most enjoyable time. Music,
Dancing, Deck Sports and Tournaments, Swimming, Parties
and many other activities are designed particularly for
student delight.
See Your Travel Agent, or
SH AMBU RG-AME RICA N .LINE E
NOR TH G E RMA N L LOYD
1205 Washington Blvd. Detroit, Mich.

amination: All students expecting to
do directed teaching next semester
are required to pass a qualifying ex-
amination in the subject which they
expect to teach. This examination
will be held on Saturday, May 20, at 1
(Continued on Page 3)

4

4

ICLASSIFIEDA E

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASS IFl ED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (on basis of
five average words to line) for One
or two lnsertjons.
l0c per ieading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per Inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
:pick up your ad at a slight extra
For further Information call
23-24-1, or stop in at 420 Maynarda
Street.
WANTED - TYPING
TYPING--Reasonable rates. L. M.
Heywood, 414 Maynard St., phone
5689. 271
TYPING-Experienced, Miss Allen,
408 5. 5th Avenue. Phonie 2-2935
or 2-1416. 79
LOST
LOST-Class ring with sapphire of
St. Cecelia Acad amy. Initials F.J.W.
Sentimental value. Thompson near
Catholic chapel. June Hughes, Uni-
versity Ext. 2145. 624
LOST-Saturday envelope contain-
ing securities, value twenty thous-
and dollars in name Frances G.
Emm ons.r Twety-fiv dollars re-
Association office, Alumni Memor-
ial Hail. 625
WANTED
WANTED-Cooking. Woman experi-
enced in institutional work desires
position with large group fratern-
ity or sorority. Box 8. 621
WANTED-Any Old Clothing. Pay $5
to $500. Suits, overcoats, mink, Per-
sian lambs, diamonds, watches,
rifles, typewriters and old gold.

SITUATION WANTED-Experienced
colored woman desires position as
cook in fraternity now or next fall.
Good references. 834 Green St.
Phone 2-1592. 626
WVANTED-For summer or longer,
young, quiet and responsible Ann
Arbor faculty couple wish well
located house. Phone 2-1498. .627
FOR SALE
soles, whit and combination $2.98.
R anid S Shoe Store, 108 S. Main
Street. 623
LAUNDRIES
L AUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 9
When Mr. and Mrs. Sweeney
Blss invade England.
rtana aie th$uls

Toe, ~
(vet
/

4

4

Did you know that radio broadcasting stations from
coast to coast are linked by more than 53,000 miles
of special telephone circuits?
Even before the earliest days of broadcasting,
Bell System engineers developed means of trans-
mitting sounds of all kinds by wire. These have
been improved constantly to transmit the extremely
high and low sound frequencies of music and
entertainment.
Just as years of telephone research stand back
of today's special broadcasting circuits--so the
research of today is helping to solve the commun-
11 r. A .1 Tb 11 a

amm

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