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September 21, 1937 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

193 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

To Be Offered
By University
Statewide Lecture Series
To Be Given By Regular
Faculty Members
A supervisied system of correspon-
dence study begun two years ago, will
be continued this year as one of the
activities of the extension division.
The purpose of the extension divi-
sion is to offer courses to persons1
throughout the state who are unable
to take advantage of the facilities of
the University except by mail in-
struction.
Students are allowed to earn
through extension courses a total of
one year's credit (30 hours) toward
a bachelor's degree. Wider range of
studies is provided for credit courses.
Included in the list of courses of-
fered for credit, are history, geog-
raphy, foreign languages, mathema-

tics, mechanical drawing and courses
in social science.
Another service offered by the ex-
tension division is that of lectures
throughout the state presented by
members of the regular faculty. A
series of health lectures by a selected
staff of physicians and dentists is
also available for schools, study
groups, civic and commercial organ-
izations.
The Library Extension Service, an-
other important activity of the exten-
sion division, collects and places at
the disposal of citizens of the state
material on many subjects of public
interest. Special attention is given
to the needs of secondary schools,
educational organizations and clubs.
Another activity of the extension
division is the arranging of confer-
ences, institutes and meetings in
order that vital problems may be dis-
cussed by and before the people of
the state. The service engages speak-
ers and sponsors such conferences.
The radio broadcasts of the Univer-
sity are also under the authority of
the extension division. The High
School Forensic Association, the Bu-
reau of Government, Bureau of Pub-
lic Health, Bureau of Visual Instruc-
tion are others among the agencies of
the division.

Home Of University's Six Student Publications

Freshmen may try out for either ical.

COLLEGE RESTAURANT
308 South State

* * *

v

CLUB BREAKFAST

LUNCHES - 30c, 35c, 45c
DINNERS - 65c, 50c, 45c, 40c
We make our own Ice Cream

Max Heald, Proprietor

.Ii

Panorama Is First
In College Field
The Student Publications family is
to have a new member this year in
Panorama, a bi-monthly picture
magazine in the style of Life mag-
azine. It is the first college picture
magazine.
The first issue of this new mag-
azine is already printed and is to be
distributed free. Joan V. Hanson, '40,
is managing editor of the new ven-
ture and Robert E. Lodge, '39, is bus-
iness manager. Assisted by a skele-
ton crew the magazine was inaug-
Howard Brubaker, in College
Humor Magazine, commented to
the following effect when the
birth of Panorama was an-
nounced:
The University of Michigan will
publish a picture magazine this
fall. It was thought it would be
nice to do something for students
who can't read.
urated only at the end of last se-
mester. Miss Hanson and Lodge put
out the first issue "so that the stu-
dent body might judge for itself the
possibilities and value of the picture
publication."
According to the editors, Panorama
will feature all campus activities, in-
cluding concerts, classes, lectures,
athletic contests, dances, favorite eat
ing places, peculiar college fashions,
the ways college students earn money,
the ways it is spent, student habita-

tions, organizations, campus charac-
ters, hobbies and interests.
While the new magazine is to have
a special staff of photographers, a
camera club will augment the supply
of pictures. The club will meet reg-
ularly and will be presided over by
the Panorama editors.
Individuals may submit pictures
All students who reported last
spring as Panorama tryouts are
asked to report to the Panorama
office in the Student Publications
Building as soon as possible to
aid in the subscription drive and
in the preparation of the first
issue. There will be a tryout
meeting at 7 p.m. today.
and the negatives will be returned.
The editors of Panorama will ac-
knowledge all photographs and, if
any pictures are sold, will remunerate
the authors.
New Design, Beauties
Are To Grace 'Ensian

life and the various scholastic units
is the main function of the 'Ensian.
While it is still too early to tell
much about what this year's 'Ensian
will loop like, editors said it will be
better than ever before.
According to this year's editors, the
design of the 'Ensian will be improved
as will the seniors' section. A novel
feature will be a beauty section. Also,
Matthews stated that for the first two
weeks of school the 'Ensian will be

Announcing!.
A new location in order
to better accommodate
your needs.
r Come and see for your-
Self what we have accom-
ished with this attempt.

priced at only $3.50.
The editorial staff of the 'Ensian
includes: Betty Gatward, '38, wom-
en's editor; Hamilton Morris, '39, in
charge of athletics; Philip Clark, '39,
who will edit activities; William
Hockett, '39, features; and David
Laing, '39, schools.
In charge of the fraternity section
will be Edward Stern, '39. Betty Span-
gler, '39, will have women's activities,
while Nancy. Dall, '39, will take charge
of the sorority section. Photography
will be under Bud Consor, '39E.
Mary Katherine Andrus, '38, is
women's business manager.
'To Be Funnier Than
Ever,' Garg Staff Says
Headed by George Quick, '38, and
Sam Krugliak, '38, managing editor
and business manager, respectively,
this year's Gargoyle, campus humor
m a┬░ine., is making claims to being

RY
Dial 2-3109

The QUAR
State Incorporated

Looked back at in later years as
the most vibrant connection grad-
uates .have with the University and(
always awaited with bated breath
by the prospective seniors, the Mich-
iganensian, University yearbook, will
be edited this year by John McFate,
'38, with Irving Matthews, '38, as bus-
iness manager.
A complete pictorial and factual
account of the activities of college

a~27 $outi

-

it

I

i

60

I s

The Michigan League extends
a warm welcome to the stu-
dents, both old and new. We
hope that during the coming
year you will find pleasure in
using our facilities.

An Open Letter to the Class of '41...
GENTLEMEN:
It has been my pleasure to serve many students during
their college careers at Michigan. I want to take this oppor-
tunity to cordially welcome your class.
Our aim is to give you the high type of service and fine
quality merchandise for which Van Boven has always stood. I
feel that one cannot determine the cost of their clothese from the
price paid . . . the length of service is the yardstick of economy.
It is my wish that you avail yourself of every possible
service that we can offer. An alert, efficient, and well-informed
staff is ready to serve each and any of your demands.

I he &ichi IIan Lakue

I I

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