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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1937 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-09-21

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_..

important part in developing several
Local Realtor subdivisions of the city.
* Mr. Brooks' offices were for many
Dies SG turda years in the present Ann Arbor Trust
D At u y Co., until about 12 years ago when he
O H eart Attack purchased the building on the north-
east corner of E. Liberty St., and S.
Fourth 'Ave., now known as the
Charles L. Brooks Figured Brooks building.
Prominently In Physical He was a member of the Ann Ar-
bor Construction Co., Abbott Gaso-
Development Of City line Co., and the Huron Valley Build-
ing and Saving Association, as well
Charles L. Brooks, 53 year old Ann as the Ann Arbor Rotary club, Bar-
Arbor realtor, who has figured prom- ton Hills Country Club, Ann Arbor
nently in the city's physical develop- Club, Camp Newton, First Methodist
nent for 25 years, died early Satur- Episcopal Church, Masons, Chamberl
of Commerce and the Ann Arbor Real
lay in Harper hospital, Detroit, after Estate Board.
i heart attack late Friday. He is survived by his widow, a son,
A lifelong resident of Washtenaw Charles, four daughters, his mother,
Iounty, he had been active in Ann two brothers and three sisters.
Arbor in the real estate field for
Nearly three decades, and played an Read Daily Classified Ads

Orgi al0Arbor Press building into one special- Bulletin was created. In the ten
Origi al Daily ly built for The Daily had been in- boom years which followed The Daily
creasingly prevalent that year, but boomed too-1930 found it strongly
A ,(, dBwhen the United States entered the entrenched. In that year it was
war the plan languished. The editor- chosen as the best college paper in
I . in-chief at this period drew a salary the country-it had already achieved
yof about $1,000 a year, with four as- the distinction of being the first paper
sistant editors getting $125 and a of its type to introduce a special Sun-
critic, whose job was to pick flaws in day issue a few years earlier.
No Fraternity Men Were each morning's paper, drew $300. The cryptic Alumnus headline
Members Of staff Of Board Is Financially Sound "Daily Goes Metropolitan" told of the
Financially the Board had grown paper's expansion in news facilities.
Pioneer Publication so strong that incorporation was The next year a reporter's dream
necessary in 1919 and a year later an- came true and the Board came
With the announcement recently other source of wealth was opened through-the beautiful and well-
that $12,000 is to be spent by the for the paper when The Daily Official equipped Student Publications office.
Board in Control of Student:Publi-

cations in completely refurnishing
the Publications Building, another
chapter has been added to a story

STUDYLAP
87C
Flexible arm and adjustable shade make
these ideal for study. Cord included at
this special price.

which started in 1890 when a hand-
ful of Michigan independents de-
cided to start a newspaper.
The first issue of that forerunner
of The Daily appeared on Sept. 29,
1890. It was a four column, four
page affair published by "The U. of
M. Independent Association" and
named the "U. of M. Daily," if the
scanty evidence available is cor-
rect. Its masthead bore the name
of The Daily's first editor-Ralph
Stone, 92L, a sophomore law stu-
dent.
Fraternity Men Admitted
Not until 1895 were fraternity men
admitted to the staff. A year after
that step thehMichigan Alumnus con-
gratulated the paper on a "Wom-
an's Issue" and in 1897 the same pub-
lication lauded The Daily for being
out of debt. The location of the
earlier publication offices 'are not
sure-rumor handed down from staff
to staff for almost half a century says
the editorial work was originally done
downtown, later moved to the second
story of the old University Music
Store building and then changed
again to the Ann Arbor Press build-
ing. Offices were maintained on the
first floor for sometime there and
were later moved upstairs. But that
was long after the turn of the cen-
tury.
It was back in 1901 when State
Street was a dirt road and sopho-
mores had to be warned each year
not to kidnap freshmen that a group!
of students decided to issue a rival
publication called "The Varsity
News." A merger with "The U. of
M. Daily" nipped that plan in the
bud, however, and "The Michigan
Daily News" resulted.
Six Men Organize
Two years later, on Thursday, Nov.
19, 1903 to be exact, six men held an
organizational meeting for a group
which was to be called "The Board in
Control of Student Publications."
Present were Prof. H. S. Whitney,
Dean of Education; Prof. F. N. Scott;
Dean Lloyd of the Law School; the
Messrs. Thompson, Sims and Stoner.
The meeting resulted in new owner-
ship for The Daily which up to this
time had labored under inefficient
and semi-irresponsible management.
The student stockholders in the pa-
per were bought out in a deal the
details of which are not known.
Soon after this time one of the most
vitrolic criticisms of The Daily which
has yet appeared in print came out
in the November edition of the Alm-
nus. "The Daily bears on every page
unmistakable marks of being strict-
ly amateur," the publication told its
readers.Itwent on to say that the
recent change of the paper's name
to "Michigan Daily" was laudable, but
criticized the size of the paper.
"The most ridiculous blunders can
be found on nearly every page-Har-
vard becomes 'harvest,' Fitzpatrick is
'Fitzgerald.' And so on ad infini-
tum."
Editors should read proof more
carefully, it was declared, and gen-
erally the "benefit from student pub-
lication work is greatly lessened by
slovenly methods allowed to go with-
out mending." The Daily curtseyed
gently, said nothing.
Daily To Steer Middle Course
In 1907 the Board in Control stated
definitely that "the policy of The
Daily is to steer along a safe course
between becoming a mere bulletin
board on the one hand and a modern
newspaper on the other."
By 1911 good business management
made another expansion possible, and
five years later The Daily achieved
national recognition. Daily editorial
writer Verne Burnett, '17, now adver-
tising manager of General Foods Cor-
poration, had written an editorial
called "Breadth and Specialization."
Entered in a contest of the Associa-
tion of Eastern College Newspapers,
the editorial won. Arthur Brisbahe,
the judge, picked it over editorials
from Trinity, Cornell, Howard, Dart-
mouth and Princeton. Press services
throughout the United States carried
news of The Daily's triumph.
Talking of moving out of the Ann

DOC Announces -
"Each week a regular weekly
board ticket will be given to the
holder of the winning number.
This board ticket will be given
absolutely free - no strings at-
tached! The winning number
will be chosen from the num-
ber on your board ticket of the
current week. The winner will
be announced at Tuesday
luncheon of each week; the
first winner will receive his
board ticket Tuesday, Septem-

I

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Univcrsity o Michigan Orato rical Association
LECTUIRE COURSE
EIGHT OUTSTANDING NUMBERS
NOVEMBER 2: TED SHAWN JANUARY 13:CAPT. JOHN
AND HIS MEN DANCERS CRAIG
"Adventures of a Thrill Cameraman."
"0, Libertad!" Motion Pictures.
NOVEMBER 18: FEBRUARY 24: SALVADOR
H. V. KALTENBORN MADRIGA
"News of the Day." "World Peace"
DECEMBER 1: JULIEN MARCH 13:
BRYAN THOMAN MANN
"Japan & Manchukuo." Motion Pictures "The Coming Victory for Democracy."
DECEMBER 9: DR. VICTOR MARCH 15: WENDELL
HEISER CHAPMAN
More of an American Doctor's "Wild Animals of the Rockies."
Odyssey.' Motion Pictures.
Season Tickets....$3.50,3.00 $2.75
-MAIL ORDERS NOW-
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
3211 ANG ELL HALL

G. E. 60-Watt Daylight LAMP .......30c
BRIDGE LAMP Complete with Shade $1.00
Cornbination
END TABLE and SMOKER ........ $1.39
MAGAZINE RACK, Walnut Finish.. $1.00
Sturdy Metal Waste BASKETS . 25c and 50c

a_
hi:

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BE WELL-GROOMED

. . . at all ties

0 . .

...
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Next! - For your conven-
ience and for prompt service
nine barber chairs . . . Mani-
curing by eiectric machines.
Remain well-groomed by
visiting often.
patronize

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your

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