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February 27, 1938 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-02-27

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17, 1938 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1-6 Teachers
Attend Parley
Of Educators
National Meeting Attracts
Local Faculty Members
To AtlanticCity
Sixteen members of the faculty,
mainly from the School of Education,
have left for Atlantic City to attend
the 68th convention of the Amer-.i
ican Association of School Adminis-
trators and the meetings of the four-
teen associated education groups
which are being held there. The con-
vention has been in session since Feb.
23 and will close March 4.
Dean James B. Edmonson of the
School of Education will speak on
"Present Day Issues in the Public
Relations Program." Dr. T. Luther
Purdom, Director of the Bureau of
Appointments and Occupational In-
formation, will address the National
Association of Teachers Agencies and
attend the meetings of the American
College Personnel Association and
the National Institutional Teacher
Placement Association.
Dr. Edgar G. Johnston, principal
of University High School, Dr. Mabel
Rugen, Dr. Cleo Murtland and Prof.
Stuart A. Courtis have been in New
York this week attending the meetings
of Progressive Education Association,
held annually in conjunction with the
administrators meet. Professor Murt-
land will also attend the Atlantic City
meet where she will preside at the
Occupational Research Section of
which she has been chairman for
three years. Professor Courtis will
speak today in New York on "Desir-
able Changes in Elementary Educa-
tion During the Next Decade."
Professor Courtis will also speak
on "The 1938 Yearbook: Cooperation"
before the Department of Supervisors
and Directors of Education and "In-
terpretation of Tests and Examina-
tions" before the joint meeting of
the Colege Teachers of Education and1
the Educational Research Associa-
tion in Atlantic City.
Prof. George E. Carrothers, direc-
tor of the Bureau of Cooperation with
Educational Institutes, will speak on
"Methods of Measuring a Secondary
School." Prof. Mowat Fraser will
speak on "Studying Recent Social
Trends." Prof. George Meyers and1
Prof. William Clark Trow will pre-
side over panel discussions. Prof.
Arthur B. Moehlman will be discus-1
sion leader of a mheeting of the Na-i
tional Advisory Council on School
Building Problems.
Prof. Willard C. Olson, director of
University Elementary School, Prof.
Raleigh Schorling, Prof. Louis W.
Keeler and Dr. Harlan C. Koch will
also attend the Atlantic City meet-1
ings.
Miss Edith Mossman of University
High School will speak to the National
Council of Mathematics Teachers. L.
L. Forsythe, principal of Ann Arbor
High School, O. W. Haisley, superin-
tendent of public school, Miss Edith
Bader, assistant superintendent, will
also make the trip.
Sportsmen Flock
To Arboretum's
Snow-Packed Hills
Skiing and sledding enthusiasts for
the past two days have taken advan-
tage of last week's hard-packing
three and one-half inch snowfall
which has made the Arborteum a
sportsmen's paradise.
There were spills aplenty but neith-
er of the local hospitals reported
serious mishaps.

Numerous fraternities molded the
snow in their front yards into figures,
both nude and swathed. Chi Psi and
Alpha Sigma Phi presented figures
of Venus, the Alpha Sigs specifying
in charcoal letters that theirs is
"Venus, '41."
Pedestrians and motorists did not
share the enthusiasm of the sports-
men, as sidewalks and roads were
slushy and poor traveling. Maximum
temperature yesterday was 27.2 and
the minimum was 14.8..
FARKAS TURNS PRO
DETROIT, Feb. 26.-()-Andy
Farkas, University of Detroit half-
back who led the Middle West in
scoring last fall, signed a contract
today to play with the Washington
Redskins in the National Professional
Football League next season. Ray
Flaherty, coach of tne championship
Resdskins, signed Parkas during a visit
to Charles E. (Gus) Dorais, Detroit
coach.

Ou0door Sports
Writer To Give
Forestr Talk
Glimpses into the wilderness of
the Hudson Bay region will be afford-
ed University students and faculty
members at 8:15 p.m. Wednesday
when Ben East, outdoor sports writ-
er, will give a motion picture lecture'
in Hill Auditorium under the auspices
of the School of Forestry and Con-
servation.
Mr. East, whose writings appear
locally in the Ann Arbor News, will
begin a three-day visit in the city
Monday by speaking before a joint
luncheon of the Kiwanis and Lions
clubs. His second appearance will be
at 2:30 p.m. Monday in the Patten-
gill Auditorium.
The lecturer headed the first or-
ganized body of sportsmen ever to
penetrate the land of the midnight
twilight, the desolate areas around
Canada's Hudson and James Bay. Mr.
East brought back from the expedi-
tion wildlife specimens for the Cran-
brook Institute of Science and mo-
tion pictures, largely in color, of re-
gions rarely seen by white men. The
lecture Wednesday will be open to
the general public. and there will be
no admission charge.
Safety Course
Red Cross Will Sponsor
Li fe-Saving Class
Plans for the American Red Cross
Water Safety Program, to be conduct-
ed nightly from March 14 to March
18 at the Intramural Building, were
announced yesterday by Josephine
S. Davis, secretary of the Washtenaw
County Chapter.
The program is based on the "Life
Saving and Water Safety" manual of
the American Red Cross and is de-
signed primarily for life saving ex-
aminers whose certificates have ex-
pired and who desire reappointment,
and Senior Life Savers who wish to
take the instructor's examination.
The course, in charge of William C.
Lucey, of St. Louis, Mo., will open
on the 14th with a lecture from 7:30
to 8:30 p.m., followed by water work
from 8:30 to 10 p.m.
This entire course is part of a na-
tional water safety program, requir-
ing examiners to be able to teach as
well as perform life-saving. To be
eligible candidates must be at least
18 years of age, in sound physical
condition, holders of Senior Life
Saving Certificates, and must have a
definite place of employment where
they will teach life-saving.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is con tructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received atrthe office of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30, 11:00 a.m. on Saturday,

(Continued from Page 2)
Research Seminary in Islamic Art.
Monday, Feb. 28, 4:15 p.m., in Room
D, Alumni Memorial Hall. Admission
free.
University Lecture: Professor E. H.
Carr, of the College of Wales, Univer-
sity of Aberystwyth, will lecture on
"Great Britain, Italy, and the Medi-
terranean" on Thursday, March 3,
at 4:15 p.m., in the Natural Science
Auditorium, under the auspices of
the Department of Political Science.
University Lecture: Professor Eu-
stache de Lorey, of the Ecole du Lou-
vre and the Oriental Department of
the Bibliotheque Nationale, will lec-
ture on "Persian Poets, Inspiration
to Persian Artists," on Friday, March
4, in Natural Science Auditorium at
4:15 p.m., under the auspices of the
Research Seminary in Islamic Art.
Public Lecture. Colored motion pic-
tures illustrating travels in the Cree
Indian country of the Hudson Bay
region will be shown by Mr. Ben East,
Michigan outdoor writer, in his lec-
ture, "The Land of the Midnight Twi-
light," at 8:15 p.m., Wednesday,'
March 2, in Hill Auditorium. The
lecture is under the auspices of the
School of Forestry and Conservation.
Students and faculty of the Univer-
sity, and others interested are invited
to attend. There will be no admis-
sion charge nor will seats be reserved.
Events Today
University Broadcast 9:00-9:30 a.m.
Hymn Class. Dr. Maddy.
12:30-1:00 p.m.
Practical Sociology for the Layman
Series. Topic: What Rural People
are Thinking About. Roy H. Holmes,
Associate Prof. of Sociology.
Phi Eta Sigma will hold a dinner
ocher Jordan
Debt Refunded
Plan Will Save University
$450,000 By 1954
A saving of $450,000 will be ac-
complished by the University through
a new plan for financing the indebt-
edness of Mosher-Jordan dormitory
which has been put into effect.
Refunding of outstanding dormitory
certificates amounting to $848,000 was
accomplished through the issuance
of $750,000 of new dormitory certifi-
cates at a lower rate of interest, and
by using $98,000 available for the
earnings of the dormitories.
Bath
Suggestions
BATH SOAPS
Roger & Gallet 3 for $1.00

at the Union on Sunday, Feb. 27, at
6:30.
Col. Henry Miller will speak on
the American rearmament program.
Report recent changes of address
to Arthur Woods, 6674.
All Graduate Students are invitedl
to meet with the members of the
Graduate Outing Club on Sunday,'
Feb. 27. The group will meet at
Lane Hall at 2:30 and will go to the
Coliseum for skating. Those who do
not wish to skate will go for a hike.
The entire group will return to Lane
Hall at 5:30 for supper, the cost of

which will not exceed 25 cents.
The Sunday Evening Forum Series
at the Hillel Foundation presents
P:of. H. J. McFarlan, who will de-
liver an address on "An Engineer
Looks Ahead." All are welcome.
The Christian Student Prayer Group
wil hold its regular meeting in the
Henderson -Room of the Mich-
igan League at 5. p.m. today. Chris-
tian students are cordially invited.
Hillel Independents: Regular bus-
iness meeting Sunday afternoon at
5:00 p.m. Meeting will be followed
by a cost supper.
Avukah Club: Regular meeting at
3:30 p.m. at the Hillel Foundation.
Coming Events

German Table for Faculty Mem-
bers: The regular luncheon meting
will be held Monday at 12:10 p.m.
in the Founders' Room of the Mich-
igan Union. All faculty members in-
terested in speaking German are
cordially invited. There will be an
informal 10 minute talk on: "Oester-
reich und das Reich," by Professor
Benjamin Wheeler.
Junior Research Club. The March
meeting will be held on Tuesday,
March 1, at 7:30 p.m., in Room 2083
Natural Science 'Building.
Mr. G. Hoyt Service will speak on
"High Gain Amplifiers for Physiolo-
gical Research" and Dr. Charles M.
Davis will talk on "Some Problems
I'll

=111

The

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G┬žID-fIBOUT

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For Information -Cali MISS JONES at 2-3241

HOWDY , PEOPLE - This is
your gabbing gadder back from
one of the gayer weeks and week-
ends that we've seen in these parts
for some time - uh-huh! Lots
of fun! Lots of people! and so
many memories - we've had our'
Tommy Dorsey, our Caduceus -
and then the Pay-Off!
SO NOW we look to new worlds
-yep, worlds of fun and frolic-to
conquer ! And are you with me?
Let's see now, there are always
classes first to dispense with. BUT,
mny friends, a point !-they may
lack the particular frolic men-
tioned, but let's not forget that
the campus cutie, Gargoyle Sweet-
heart, or whatever role Josie
Co-Ed is playing today, must look
her very bestest even in classes!
And so being such a gadder any-
way. I noticed that it's the ELIZ-
ABETH DILLON SHOP which has
just the two-piece tailored suit
that you'll want-and in rose, aqua
and blues. They're just right to
wear now under your coat-and
you might try that luscious pow-
der blue reversible-it's a dream!
(Order one in any soft color you
desire.)
TAKING IN CLASSES was such
fun (?)--but now let's taste a bit
of the informal and formal-we
have all varieties in our social cir-
cles-all flavors, too! For instance,
that informal show date, hockey
or basketball game will call for a
KESSEL CAMPUS SHOP pastel
wool or new spring print-and
then if there's an air of formality
to be created-never fear, my
friend, everything will be taken
care of. All you have to do is don

that filmy yet youthfully crisp
turquoise marquisette formal that
is gracing Kessel's arcade window
-or the sleek black and white-
and you'll be dancing to the strains
of "Did you ever see a dream
walking . .
WE MAY not have the balmy
breezes of Florida-nor even a
good share of California's sun-
shine (?)-but we will eventually
-eventually, gals,-,-and in the
meantime let's do a little planning
headline planning in the field of
Sprimg profiles-let's get a new
SLANT on spring this year at
JUNE GREY'S HAT STUDIO-
the possibilities are enormous-
and the straws ,silks, and felts are
very smart and new-especially
suitable to "feminine" poke-
bonnets, off the face halos, toques,
turbans-just anything that suits
your own particular personality!
A GADDER-always snooping-
always peering and carousing-
that's your correspondent, gals-
and in my snooping around the
cosmetic counter of CALKINS-
FLETCHER'S the other day a
case of adorable perfume bottles
caught my eye-lovely pink, green,
and pale blue glass-cut in delicate
patterns--in different sizes and
prices-and very decorative for the
dresser! Then there's Dorothy
Gray's cosmetic kit that caught my
attention-fitted attractively with
hand lotion and cream, complex-
ion tonic, powder, cleansing and
nourishing creams! Now it's your
turn to look around-see what you
can find!

Radiantly young NEW pastels
that keep you looking your
loveliest! Sheer wools and
alpacas: new dusty pink, blue,
rose-red, violet - blue, beige.

Sizes I1 to 20
from

Sizes 32 to 40

III-

'1

!s .

:.

-11

-if

EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS

WJR
P.M.
6:00-Joe Pennez.
6:30-Double Everything,
7:00-Open House,
7:30-Phil Baker.
8:00-Earaches of 1938.
8:30--Musical Gazette.
9:00-Ford Hour.
10:00-Zenith Foundation.
10:30-Hermit's Cave.
11:00-Abe Lyman's Orch.
11:30-Cab Calloway,
12:00-Dick Barrie's Orch.
WWJ
P.M.
6:00-Catholic Hour.
6:30-People in the News.
6 :45-Studio Feature.
7:00-Jack Benny.
7:30-Interesting .Neighbors.
3 :00-Charley McCarthy.
9:00-Manhattan Merry-Go-Round.
9:30-Familiar Music.
10:00-Rising Stars.
10 :30-"America and war."
11:00-Dance Music.
11:30-News, Music.
WXYZ
P.M.
6:00-George Jessel.
6:30-To Be Announced.
7:00-Dinner Concert.
7:30-Ozzie Nelson.
8:00-Detective Series.
8:30-California Concert.
9:00-Hollywood Playhouse.
9:30-Walter wincheli.
9:45-Irene Rich.
10:00-Marek Weber Orch.
10 :30-Cheerio.
11:00-John McKay.
11:30-Henry Busse Orch.
12:00-Eddie Varzos Orch.
CKLW
P.M.
6:00-whatPriceLoyalty?
6 :30-Newstesters.
7:00-Forum.

Arden Geranium

$1.00

Yardley's 35c, 3 for $1.00
Wrisley's . ...... 50c box

Ayer Cream Bath

Soap
$1.25 box

BATH OILS
Pine

Bottle

50c

WATER SOFTENERS
Yardley Lavendameal $1.10

Everyone Tries to Make a Dollar

Bathosweet

50c & $1.00

FISHOW'S WATCH
and
JEWELRY REPAIR
347 Maynard Cor. William
Watch Crystals 35c

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Bubblebath 35c, $1, $2.00
Rubenstein Pasteurized
Milk Bath ..... $2.00
Bath Salts ........ 50c up
BATH POWDERS

*

0
Roger & Gallet

. $1.00

._..
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4711 ..... ....
Lentheric .... .
Dr'Orsay

$1.10
$1.50
. $1.3T

We all are faced with the problem of
making our money go as far as possible. The
problem is common to merchants, house-
wives and students. However, the Michigan
Daily has the solution to the problem of the
merchant. It is in his advertising. The busi-
ness man of Ann Arbor wants to attract cus-
tomers to his store, but his funds do not
allow him to use all the means at his com-
mand.

The most economical way for the busi-
ness man or woman of Ann Arbor to adver-
tise his product is through the Michigan

"Hats That Are Different"
STRAW. ..FELT... FABRIC
MADE TO ORDER
TO MATCH YOUR COSTUME

Rubenstein . . .$1,00, $1.50
Yardley......$1.35, $3.50
Elizabeth Arden $1, $3.00
'Harriet Hubbard Ayer $1.00

I I,

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