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April 23, 1938 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1938-04-23

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SATURDAY, APRIL 223, 1938

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

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P--B y IRVIN LISAGOR...
Stating A Case .. .
THISBUSINESS of sportswriting is
an abused racket. We of the ath-
letic press take it in the neck News-
men look at us as rude incompetents,
blessed with a racing imagination and
a vibrant verbiage but wholly un-
acquainted with the finer points of
newswriting. We are inaccurate. We
are never concise. We ramble, rave,
and color a simple story so that it
becomes totally devoid of news value.
Our leads gush with flowery phraseo-
logy. We are word crazed, headstrong
"gee-whizzers"-a blight on the hon-
orable profession of journalism.
Some of this criticism is justi-
fied. Stanley Walker, in his val-
uable work "City Editor," points
out some of the flaws of our
branch of the profession, and
it's a treatise that the embryo
sports writer might well read. So
might the editorial aces, the boys
who levy constant deprecation at
the sportswriter. They hold that
the sports page is an illiterate
conglomeration, composed by a
group of nincompoops, and read
in pool rooms, the backs of street
cars, in speakeasies and along the
waterfront. They deride our ef-
forts; they laugh at our tech-
nique. To these illustrious gentle-
men we dedicate this piece. It's
our idea of how some of our edi-
torial colleagues might write a
baseball game in best "newsy"
fashion. It's utterly without the
sports cliche, which gives them
all such belly laughs. Exaggera-
tion is employed solely for em-
phasis. Here goes:
Guff School of Technology, a Po-
dunk, Ill., institution, beat Butts
Collegiate Seminar of Paradise Pond,
in a game of baseball here yesterday,
it was reliably reported by those close
to Jones Field, a 10 acre plot at Jones
and Alexander Avenues where the
game was reportedly played.
Fifteen representatives of Guff ran
across "home plate," the last re-
quired "base." Five representatives of
Butts did likewise. This made the
score Guff 15, Butts 5. 18 men played,
nine on each side. There were two
umpires, three ticket takers, and 553
spectators, most of whom sat in the
concrete and wooden bleachers which
border the field.
Aloysious J. Potts, 21, of 664
Minerva Ave. (suite 2) threw the
ball 60 feet from the "pitchers
mound" to "home plate." Mr.
Potts was called "pitcher." Guff
used "Lefty" Wozeka, 23, of
Broken Axle, Iowa, as "pitcher."
He threw the pellet with his left
arm.
Guff batted nine times while
Butts batted eight times. They
did not bat the last time. In' the
first "inning," Guff made four
"runs" 15 minutes before Butts
made them "field." This is better
than average.
Leslie Vandertwerp, 20, of Yoach-
in, Ga., who "batted" first was suc-
cessful. He "hit" the white pellet 45
yards, six feet, three inches in a
southerly direction and ran to "sec-
ond base." Authorities called it a
"double."
The game was suddenly interrupt-
ed. A short, heavy set, grey haired
man, about five feet five inches tall,
wearing a black overcoat stood up
and. emitted a low, guttural sound
which resounded over the field. Syn-
onomously he cried: "pull dat punk
outadere."
Police escorted him out of the
park. Authorities declared the
noise had been caused by a
unique rumbling of the tongue,
technically known as rendering
the "razzberries." He was not
held.

At 4:13 p.m. both teams sud-
denly left the field. It was re-
ported that the game was over.
Umpires would not comment,
however, but those close to the
field insisted that the move was
rife with diplomatic possibilities.
An irate Guff fan, J. Bull
Barnes, insisted: "we wuz robbed.
Why dose yokels, we could take
'em wit any old joe chukkin'.
Whatdahell. Will butch 'em next
trip." Interpreters were vainly
trying to unravel this comment
late last night.
Martin's Daughter Is Ill
So Pepper Plays Hookey
OKLAHOMA CITY, April 22.--(4)
-John (Pepper) Martin played hoo-
key today to see an ailing daughter
here-but all he could do was stand
outside the window and make faces
at her.
The Martin home is quarantined

olfers
Team Opposes
M.S.C. In First
Home Match
Barclay, Karpinski, Riess,
Yearnd To Face State's
ExperiencedSquad
Michigan, coming up against the
highly rated Michigan State golf
team this afternoon, finds itself with
a handicap on its hands. Besides
trying t'o beat the Spartans, Michi-
gan will attempt to overcome the let-
down which it had experienced all
week after the southern trip.
The first foursome is slated to leave
the first tee of the University course
at 12:30 p.m.
Is Seventh Meet Of Year
The meet will be the Varsity's sev-
enth of the season but its initial
home engagement. Last Monday the
Wolverines defeated Ohio State and
previously had won three, lost one
and tied one on its spring vacation
jaunt throrgh Dixieland.
Coach Ray Courtright intends to
start four men who have seen quite
a bit of action in other encounters.
Two of them, Bill Barclay and Capt.
Al Karpinski, performed against
State last year. Barclay will again
be No. 1 starter, followed by Kar-
pinski, Lynn Riess and Bill Yearnd
in that order. Bill Barclay will play
in a reserve match.
Yearnd Is Long Driver
Riess, although only a sophomore,
has consistently turned in low scores
in all the meets in which he has
played. Yearnd, who also won a
Varsity letter last year, is considered
the squad's best driver, many of his
clouts reaching 300 yards. While he
did not go on the southern tour
.Black was selected by Courtright to
play in the reserve match because of
his excellent showing in practice.
"It will be a close meet," Court-
right said yesterday. "Michigan State
has a strong-well-balanced outf(it
with three regulars returning. But
we've still got the experience from
the other meets and I think we can
beat this let-down."
Michigan State brings practically
the same team that the Wolverines
defeated last season, 12-6, in the
series opener. State will line-up with
Ed Flowers, Tom Brand, Roy Nelson
and Bob Tansey respectively. Only
Fansey of the first four is new. Bud
Stephens will be Black's opponent.
State Has Experience
Flowers was runner-up in the Wes-
tern Michigan amateur tourney last
summer while Brand, who turned in
the low score last year, has been West
Virginia State amateur champion for
the past two years. Tansey comes
from a famous Michigan golfing fam-
ily and has had a great deal of train-
ing. Nelson was runner-up in the
Lansing district golf tournament last
year.
Coach Courtright is as yet undecid-
ed about how he will play his best
ball combinations. The course is ex-
pected to be in first class shape for
the meet. The greens are fast and
should make for good putting.
HE'S STARTING EARLY
DETROIT, April 22.-(p')-Walter
Reckinger, a 15-year-old boy pitch-
ing his first regular high school base-
ball game, hurled a no-hitter today
to give Sacred Heart an 8-2 victory
over St. Clements. Reckinger struck
out 10 batters, but issued seven walks,
and these, with two errors, gave his
opponents their two runs.

Play

Here

Hits-But In Vain

Varsity Beats
Hoosiers, 4-3
At Champaign
Team Wins Three Singles
Matches, One Douhles
Event To Triumph
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., April 22.-
(Special to The Daily) -Michigan's
tennis team whipped Indiana 4 to 3
here today in a meet that was not de-
cided until the final set of the last
doubles match.
With the meet score tied at three
matches apiece, the Wolverine
doubles team of Steve Woolsey and
John Kidwell came from behind to
win over the Hoosier No. 2 duo of
Vic Kingdom and Gilmore Haynie,
2-6, 6-1, 6-3.
Michigan captured an early edge
by taking three of the five singles
battles. The most closely contested
singles play of the day was between
Capt. Neil Levenson of the Wolver-
ines and the Indiana leader, John
Tuthill. The latter captured the
first set, 9-7; but Levenson rallied to
win the match with his accurate
sharpshooting.
Summaries
Singles: Levenson (M) defeated
Tuthill (I) 7-9, 6-2, 6-2; Dulberger
(ID defeated Percival (M), 6-0, 6-0;
Kingdon (1) defeated Woolsey (M)
6-1, 6-3; Kidwell (M) defeated Hay-
nie (I) 6-3, 6-3; Cohen (M) defeated
Davis (I) 6-3, 6-2.
Doubles: Tuthill-Dulberger (I) de-
feated Percival-Cohen (M) 1-6, 6-2,
6-3; Woolsey-Kidwell (M) defeated
Kingdom-Haynie (I) 2-6, 6-4, 6-4.
My Greatest
THRILL

Today;

Danny Smick, whom Coach Ray
Fisher converted into a pitcher
from a first baseman, moved once
more, this time into right field,
and justified the wisdom of this
latest move by garnering three
bingles in seven attempts against
Illinois yesterday.
Box Scores

Michigan, 9 AB R
Trosko 2b..........7 2
Brewer, ss ...........4 1
Peckinpaugh, 3b .....6 1
Kremer, cf ..........4 1
*Lisagor .............1 0
Pink, cf .............1 1
Campbell, If .........5 0
Smick, rf ...........7 1
Gedeon, lb..........6 1
Beebec............6 1
Andronik, p.........0 0
Fishman, p.........4 0
Smith, p............0 0
Totals.........51 9

H1
1
2
0
1
0
1
1
3
1
1
0
2
0
13
H
2
2
0
0
0
1
2
3
0
3
0
0
0

O
2
3
1
1
0
0
3
4
6
15
0
0
0
35
O
4
2
8
1
2
10
Y
3
0
2
1
0
2

A
3
0
1
0
0
0
01
0
0
0
0
3
0
7
A
3
0
0
0
0
1
1
0'
21
0l
1
0'
91

Illinois, 10
Cavallo, 2b.......
Callahan, cf .......
Conley, lb........
Berner, rf .........
Mazeika, rf ........
McConnell, c ......
Sainati, p .........
Kucera, ss .........
**Richter .........
Kallis, 3b .........
Farrington, If.
Doyle, if.........
Christiansen, If .
Totals......

Ab R
..7 1
..5 1
..6 1
..5 1
..1 0
..4 3
..5 1
..5 1
..0 1
..5 0
1 0
.3 0
..1 0

I
1
l
{
"

CLARENCE MUNN
Michigan Football Coach
Any fellow who has ever played in
the backfield never loses the desire to
score a touchdown in a football game.
In high school, I played fullback, but
when I went to Minnesota, I was
transferred to guard. Naturally, I
never lost that old scoring urge.
We were playing our home-
coming tame against Wisconsin
in 1931, and Fritz Crisler, our
coach, had us all primed for a
victory. But the Badgers had a
powerful team and we were given
little chance of beating them. It
turned out to be a great game
and we beat Wisconsin 14 to 0
mainly through Crisler's strategy.
The play that gave me the biggest
kick and a great thrill was a tricky
one which found me realizing my old
high school ambitions again. The
tail-back started around end, tossed
a lateral to a guard-which happened
to be mie-and I ran for the first
touchdown of my college career.
Carrying that ball and crossing the
old goal line was something I won't
ever forget.

.48 10 13 36

'*Ptted for Kremer in eighth.
Two out when winning run scored
'*Ran for Kucera in twelfth.
Michigan......070 000 010 001- 9
Illinois........500 200 100 002-10,
Errors: M., Peckinpaugh, 1. I.,
Runs batted in: Kremer 4, Beebe,
Cavallo 1, Kucera 3, Kallis 1, Doyle 1.
Brewer, Smick, McConnell, Kallis,
Kucera 4, Conley, Berner, Cavallo.
Home run: Kremer. Two base-hit,
Gedeon, Callahan 2, Kucera. Stolen
bases, Piik, Kucera. Double play:
Kallis to Kucera to Conley.

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THIS LITTLE POEM, representative of much contemporary rhyme,
has an important message which may not at first be evident. After
carefully scanning the lines once again, yae even thrice again, one
is able to secure for himself the fullest meaning of this message. It
is simply this:

SINK OR SWIM, whether you dive or just dunk, you will find
no better place to relax than in the Union Pool. Splash away those
lazy Spring moments in its clear, cool, sparkling water. And after
an invigorating swim why don't you take advantage of our up-to-date
steam equipment?

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