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February 28, 1937 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-02-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEB. 28, 1937

.0

Hohlfeld To Discus Wilbur Sees Great Opportunities
Wagner And Goethe n
In Public Personnel Managrement
Q tvtit ~ta rl- - "--- I-- .4 1;-._z

(Continued from Page 1)
to close up the gap that has existed
between the United States and niany
turopean countries by the establish-
mfent of career service systems under
which positions are given to men who
are fitted for them rather than to
hen who have been active in securing
the election of the particular party
in power," Mr. Wilbur said.
The civil service bill drawn up by
Michigan's Civil Service Study Com-
mission, headed by Prof. James K.
Pollock of the political science de-
partment, is in Wilbur's opinion a
very commendable job. "I think the
commission did an excellent piece of
work in drafting the bill," he said.
He did not think highly of the
amendment tacked on by the Senate
Thursday which provides for the
coipulsory choice for a position of
the men having the highest score on
an examination rather than a choice
from the highest three men.
"Any party that can poll over 16,-
000,000 votes at an election is farI
from dead," Mr. Wilbur said turn-I

ing to the national political scene.
"In many instances where President
Roosevelt and the Denceratic party
carried the national posts, the Re-
publicans won the local ones," he said,
"and this indicates that there is a
foundation upon which to build a
stronger party."
"I feel that John Hamilton is aj
good manager and realizes that the
work of narty stren.the.irig will have

.1
i
1

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1

to start at the bottom-the localE
units," Mr. Wilbur said.
The President's proposed reorgani- 1
zation of the Supreme Court wasT
criticized by Mr. Wilbur. "Like manyi
others, regardless of party affilia-
tions," he said, "I believe that thet
President's plan is an infringment onc
the domain of the judiciary:"t
The issue raised by the "President's i
proposal may prove good rallying<
ground for the Republican party, Mr.
Wilbur said. "It does not look now z
as if there will be any realignment oft
parties for 1940," he said, "althoughY
there is a possibility of a union ofi
Republicans and anti-New Deal
Democrats versus the New Deal
Party."t
IO PROGRAMS

EVENING RAD

German Prize
Essay Contest
Is Announced
The German department of the
University announces again the
Bronson-Thomas prize, an annual
award totaling $30, awarded on the'
basis of a three-hour essay contest
to be held under departmental su-
pervision in April.
The subjects for this year's essays
cover the five periods in German lit-'
erary history from 1750 to 1900. Each
contestant will be given a reading
list, according to Prof. Henry A.
Nordrnmyer, head of the German de-
partment, from which he is to select
reading for one of the periods. After
satisfying the department that he has
completed the necessary reading, he
will be admitted to the contest and
may write his essay in either English
or German.
The Bronson-Thomas award was
made possible by a $1,000 donation
of Thomas Bertrand Bronson, '81,
master of modern languages in Law-
renceville Preparatory School. It was
stipulated that the donation be used
for an annual essay prize. Mr. Bron-
son named his bequest in honor of
Calvin Thomas, '74, professor of the
German languages and literature in
the University.
Churches Will Hear
New Pastors Today
(Continued fronm Page 1)
on "Man Controlling His Destiny" at
the 7 p.m. service of the Unitarian
church. "Twelve Points of Human-
ism" is the topic for discussion at
the 7:45 p.m. meeting of the student
group.
Prof. D. V. Baxter of the School of
Forestry and Conservation will give
an, illustrated' lecture at _6:30 p.m. on
"On and Off Alaskan Trails" at the
St. Paul's Lutheran Church.
At the First Baptist church the
Rev. Edward Sayles will give a ser-
mon on "What is Religion" at the
10:45 a.m. service.
The Rev. Allison Ray Heaps will
give his last sermon until Easter on
the subject "Things That Abide" at
10:45 a.m. in the First Congregational
church. "Present Day Observance of
Lent" will be the topic for a discus-
sion led by Mrs. John Luther at the
Student Fellowship of the church at
5 p.m.
At the Roger Williams Guild of the
First Baptist church the Rev. Chap-
man will continue the discussion of
"The Prophet Amos and His Mes-
sage." Prof. Howard McClusky of the
School of Education will speak at a
student meeting at 6:15 p.m. on "If I
were a Student."
The Rev. Dr. C. W. Brashares'will
give another in the series of Lenten'
services on the'subject of "Mind and
Motion" at the 10:30 a.m. service of
worship.

Jamison Says Crop
Plan Not Insurance
(Continued from rage 1)
administration, including crop insur-
ance, and is a commendable under-
taking.
In some cases, however, Professor
Jamison explained, the more fortu-
nate or far-sighted farmers, such asi
those in the fertile Willamette valley
of Oregon, should not be forced to
pay for those less fortunate in the
success of their crops, for it is know
that relief has been obtained where
it was not justified.
Professor Jamison, although realiz-
ing the exigency of affording' aid to
those affected by the drought, point-

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as illustrations of the fact that gov-
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frailties, erroneous judgments and
might in some cases culminate in en-
couragement of slothfulness, with re-
sulting injustice to the more indus-
trious individuals in this count'y.
Then, too, he advised, those who
are more fortunate should not object.
to contributing toward the welfare of
the less fortunate or, in specific cases,
lazy individuals, if only to avoid in-
ternal dissension.
Professor Jamison likened the
problem of crop "insurance" to the
problem of unemployment "insur-
ance" in several of its aspects, call-
ing neither insurance in the ordinary
sense when it involved catastrophe
hazards in which the risk could not
be computed on an actuarial'basis.

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Ed~cdy.
8:30-Texaco Fire Chief Program with
Eddie Cantor and Jacques Renard s
Orch.
9:00- Ford Slunday Evening Hour.,
10:00-Orginal Gillette Community Sing.
10:45-H. V. Kaltenborn.
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12:30-Univ. of Chicago Round TaUle
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