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May 21, 1937 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1937-05-21

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 21, 1937

PAGE TWO FRIDAY, MAY 21, 1937

NEWSI
Of The DAY
(By The Associated Press)
Strike-Breaking Bill
Blocked By Filibuster
LANSING, May 20. - (P) - The
House Rules Committee reported out
tonight the Berka Resolution to give
the Governor emergency power in
the event of a Public Utility strike,
but its progress was blocked imme-
diately by a filibuster.
Rep. Frank J. Nerka, Saginaw Dem-
ocrat, introduced the resolution today
and it went to the Committee with-
out comment from the floor. The au-
thor referred to yesterday's strike by
employes of Consumers Power Com-
pany and said any similar tie-up
would disrupt "the lives of thousands
of citizens."
Teaching Of Sex Hygiene
Is Proposed In House
LANSING, May 20.-P)--A bill
which would permit the teaching of
sex hygiene in public schools was re-
ported to the floor of the House to-
day by the House Committee on Ed-
ucation.
Dr. Davis Says
Novelst Must
Remove Detal
(Continued from Page 11
ognition extended by the Committee
on Student Affairs on the conditions
that the Club not affiliate with any
national organization for one year
and with the suggestion that members
sign a membership blank that clari-
fies the aims of the organization.
Richard Scammon, Grad. , new
chairman of the Civil Liberties and
Academic Freedom Committee, was.
chosen delegate to the Washtenaw
Conference for the Protection of Civil
Liberties. Campbell and John Brin-
nen, '40, new chairman of the Com-
mittee on Culture and Education,
were selected -as delegates to the
American Youth Congress meeting in
Milwaukee, July 2-5.
Marshall D. Shulman, '37, and

Bernstein Is
Found Guilty
Misconduct1
Statements Of Witnesses
Are Contradictory To
Those Of Patrolmen
(Continued from Page 1)
ian, testified. Standing at a distance
of 12 feet, Uhlendorf said, he saw
Bernstein say a word or two and then
saw him pulled into the City Hall.
Bernstein was, arrested before Has-
kell, Uhlendorf declared, and the
noise could only have been heard one
block away on a Friday or Saturday
night.
Marshall D. Shulman, '37, former
associate editor of The Daily, testi-
fied that he stood inside the police
station but "did not hear Bernstein
at all."
"I was arrested immediately after
Bernstein," Haskell stated. "Bern-
stein asked for silence as I was walk-
ing away from him, but he could not
have spoken more than 15 seconds,
when I turned around and saw he
was gone," Haskell testified.
Arthur C. Lehman, Bernstein's at-
torney, pointed out to the jury that
there was no testimony that Bern-
stein was in the picke't line, that he
policemen did not know who was ar-
rested first and that Bernstein had
attempted to preserve the peace when,
he asked the crowd to be silent.
City Attorney William Laird then
told th jurors that Bernstein was
heard above the noise by Patrolman
Gainsley, that the defendant was
"haranguing and inciting" the
crowd, but that people can picket in
Ann Arbor if they preserve the peace.
Richard Clark, '37, the Club's out-
going president and respectively vice-
president were voted honorary mem-
berships by the group.
More .than $28 was collected at the
meeting to help defray expenses in the
current trials of students for disorder-
ly conduct in a strike demonstration
here April 8.
Other committee heads chosen last
night are Earle B. Luby, '38, security
committee; Elman Service, '39, peace;
Philip Cummins, '39, publicity; Ruth
Horland, '39, membership, and F.
Paul Probert, '37, racial and social
equality.

Conference On Land Utilization
To Meet Today And Tomorrow
Discussion Will Be Broad problems of planning, land use ad-
Rather ThaI Technical, justment, conservation, development,
resettlement and zoning.
Prof. Ramsdell Says The conclusions of the conference
will then be formulated.
(Continued from Page 1) Besides Deans Dana and Yoakum
and Professors McMurry and Schoen-
years to hold the position of director mann, the other faculty men who will
of the division of economics and sta- attend the conference are: Carl F.
tistics under the Federal Housing Ad-1 Behrens, research assistant in land
ministration. He will preside at the economics; Prof. George C. S. Ben-
session tomorrow morning. son of the bureau of government;
The conference will open at 9:30 Prof. Arthur W. Bromage of the po-
a.m. tomorrow with a talk by Dean litical science department; Prof.
Clarence S. Yoakum of the graduate Robert S. Ford of the economics de-
school. Dean Yoakum will explain partment; Prof. Frederick M. Gaige7
the functions of the University Insti- of the zoology department.I
tute of Public and Social Adminis- Prof. Edgar M. Hoover of the ec-I
tration, which along with the Social onomics department; Prof. Roderick'
Science Research Council is sponsor- D. McKenzie, head of the sociology
ing the conference. department; Prof. Willett F. Rams-
Schoenmann Speaks dell of the forestry school; Prof.
Charles F. Remer, acting head of the
Following Dean Yoakum, Prof. Lee economics department.
Roy Schoenmann who is the Charles econoics eparment
T4~l 7fmt eintro h

Lathrop Pack Professor of Wild Land
Utilization, will discuss the Cheboy-
gan County venture. In the remain-
der of the conference, specific prob-
lems in land utilization will be dis-
cussed in reference to this project.
Prof. Kenneth C. McMurry, head
of the geography department, will!
preside at the morning session.
President Ruthven will be the only
speaker at the luncheon today. He
will discuss the opportunities of the
onferenPPe

rsar m u.ormu, aiector of
bureau of government; and Prof. Har-
low O. Whittemore of the landscape
design department.
Hopwood Novel
To Be Printed
SBy Macmillan

Adult Education
Institute Hears
Many Lectures
Conferences Will CloseI
Today In League; Has
Been Going Four Days
(Continued from Page 1)-
continued, "a general increase in re-
cent years in the cost of government.
This is the result of greater demands
for service from the government."
In concluding, Professor Ford de-
clared that a centralization of tax ad-
ministration at Lansing would be a,
"decided benefit" to Michigan tax-
payers. There is such a proposal be-
fore the legislature at the presentf
;ime, he said.
The need of highly competent and
professional training for the journal-
istic profession as opposed to the ap-
prenticeship method of learning the
profession was stressed by Prof. John
L. Brumm of the journalism depart-
ment.
"Newspapers," said P r o f e s s o r
Brumm, "though differing in editorial.
policy, all have the same purpose;
they are dedicated to an exacting so-
cial service, that of presenting news,
to the public."
He pointed out that in order tc,
maintain a high standard of editorial
perfection in the newspapers it is
necessary that the prospective jour-
nalist be trained professionally for
his position.
The majority of cases of syphilis
are not contracted from illicit sex re-
(Continued on Page 3)
I Bremler To IHead
Girl's (ooperative
Muriel Bremer, '38. was chosen
temporary chairman of the group of
women planning a cooperative house
at an organization meeting held Wed-
nesday in the League.
Assisting Miss Bremer are Char-
lotte Morehouse, '38, vice-chairman;
Helen Breed, '40, secretary; and Mi-
riam Newman, '37, treasurer.
Applications for the house are now
available at the Office of the Dean
of Women and must be filed by Wed-
nesday, May 26 by those interested
in living in the cooperative.
A membership meeting for those
wishing information about the house
and the cooperative plan will be held
at noon, Saturday in the League.

CKLW-1030 Kilocycles
fl P.M.
6 00-Stevenson Sports.
6:15-The Turf Reporter.
6:30-Rick Roberts' Orch.
6:45-Lee Shelley's Orch.
7:00-Richard Himber's Coffee Club. 1
7:30-Blanche Calloway's Orch.
8:00-Joe Sanders' Orch.1
8:15-Rick Roberts' Orch.l
8 30-Bamberger Symphony Orch,
9:00-Jack Denny's Orch.-
19:30-Mario More li's Ensemble.l
10:00-Henry King's Orch.
10:15-Ted Weems' Orch.l
10:30-Leo Reisman's Orch.
11:00-Canadian Club Reporter.
11:15-Carl Hoff's Orch.
11:30-Jack Denny's Orch.
Midnight-Lee Shelley's Orch.
12:30-Joe. Sanders' Orch.
1:00-Weather Forecast.
WJR-750 Kilocycles
P.M.
6 :00--News and Sports.
6:15-Willie Morris and Edward Nell, Jr.
6:30-The Allen Family.
Airport Dedicated
At Tulip Festival
HOLLAND, Mich., May 20.-(P)--
The dedication of an airport and an
aerial fair were features of Holland's
annual tulip festival today.
Participating in the dedication were
C. C. Wood, Holland, chairman and
Tom Walsh, Grand Rapids, member
of the State Board of aeronautics;
George Haldeman, aeronautical in-
spector of the Federal Bureau of Air
Commerce, and Louis B. Nimms, Bay
City, state WPA director.
Nimms delivered the dedicatory ad-
dress. William M. Connelly, of the
Holland Chamber of Commerce, esti-
mated that 10,000 persons were pres-
ent.
FORD GETS RAPID REWARD
DETROIT, May 20.-0(1)-Henry
Ford received the highest honor ac-
corded by the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers tonight for his
contribution to development of the
automobile.

EVENING RADIO PROGRAMS

6:45-Boake Carter.
7:00-Broadway Varieties.
7:30-Hal Kemp's Orch.
8:00-Hollywood Hotel.
9:00-San Francisco Symphony Orch.
9:30-Babe Ruth.
9:45-Vocal Varieties.
10:00--Mortimer Gooch.
10:00-Musical.
10:30-The Great Plague.
10:45--Eddy Duchin's Orch.
11:00-Headline News.
11:15-This Week in Review.
11:45-Benny Goodman's Orch.
Midnight-Marvin Frederic's Orch.
12:30-To Be Announced.
WWJ-920 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:00-Tyson's Sports Review.
6:10-Dinner Music.
6 :30-Bradcast.
6:40-Odd Facts.
6:45-Sports Review.
7:00-Cities Service Hour.
8:00-Waltz Time.
8:30-True Story Hour.
9:00-First Nigh ter.
9:30-Jimmie Fidler.
10:00-Amos n" Andy.
10:15-Musical Moments.
10:30-Detroit News Radio Extra.
11:00-Webster Hall Orch.
11:30-Dance Music.
Midnight-Northwood Inn Orch.
12:30-Weather.
WXYZ-1240 Kilocycles
P.M.
6:45-The Factfinder.
7 :00-Irenc Rich.
7:15-Singin' Sam.
7:30-Death Valley Days.
8:00-All-Negro Revue.
8:30-Coronet on the Air.
9:00-Jack Pearl.
9:30-WhitneyrEnsemble.
9:45-Factfinder.
10:00-Harold True.
10 :15-Chicago Symphony Hour.
11:00-Lowry Clark Orch.
12:30-Arthur Ravel Orch.
Midnight-Tom Gentry Orch,
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
-romptly and neatly done by expal.-
aced operators at moderate pri..
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State fsrebs
-Last Day
VICTOR MOORE and
HELEN BRODERICK
"WE'RE ON THE JURY"
and
"MAKE WAY FOR A LADY"
--Starting Saturday -
The Gant Musical!
"Top of
The Town"
with
DORIS NOLAN
GEORGE MURPHY
HUGH HERBERT
GERTRUDE NIESEN

(Ulcn , L;
Dean Samuel T. Dana of the for- "The Stubborn Way," a novel by
estry school will preside at the af- Baxter T. Hathaway, Grad., which
ternoon round table discussion today won an $800 major Hopwood prize
which will start at 1:30 p.m.$I
At the final meeting, the applica- last year, will be published by Mac-
search in land utilization and its millan Co. in the autumn, it was
function will be discussed. An analy- learned yesterday.
sis will be made of research activi- { The novel, originally titled "The
ties that have been completed or are. Little World," concerns the struggle
now under way. An attempt will be of a young man working in a paper
made to indicate those sections of! mill to adjust himself and find a
the field that have been intensively toadjus hisef and ind a
worked, those that have been less I standard of values for his life, ac-

Classified Directory

fully covered and those that have
been left largely unexplored.
To Discuss historical Approach
The evening session today, which
starts at 8:30 p.m.. will be an inform-
al meeting to discuss the historical
approach to research in land utiliza-
tion. It will be held in Clements Li-
brary; Randolph G. Adains, the li-
brary's director will lead the dis-
cussion.
At 9 a.m .tomorrow the round table
discussions will be resumed with a
consideration of how coordination of
activities can be carried out, espe-
cially in regard to the Cheboygan
county venture.
Integrationof proceedure of re-
search in the physical, economic, po-
litical, and social aspects of the land
utilization problems will be taken up.
The conference will close with the
meeting at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow at
which Jacob Crane, Jr., consultant of
the National Resources Committeel
will preside.I
At the final meeting the applica-
tion of the results of research will be
dealt with. These applications will
be taken up in connection with thel

cording to the author. It is not, how-
ever, a "proletarian" novel, he added.
The scene is laid in Michigan.
Hathaway, at present working for
a doctor's degree in English, is from
Kalamazoo. His novel is the fourth
Hopwood award winner to be pub-
lished, having been preceded by Mil-
dred Walker's "Fireweed," Hubert
Skidmore's "I Shall Lift Up Mine
Eyes," and Ruth Lininger Dobson's
"Straw In the Wind." Mrs. Dobson's
book won a $1,500 award last year in
the same competition that Hatha-
way's book was entered, and was pub-
lished early this year.
3anitors, Custodians
To Hold Meeting Today
A meeting of the janitors and cus-
todians union, consisting of mainten-
ance workers of the University, will
be held in Room 101 Economics Build-
ing today at 4 p.m., Will Canter
chairman pro tem announced last
night.
The purpose of the meeting will be
to elect officers and discuss means of
extension, he explained.

DRENE
NOT SOAP - NOT Oil
Billowy Suds...Banishes
Soap Film...l.eaves Hair
Soft, Lustrous.
$1.00 SIZE
79c
60c SIZE - 40c
Miller
Drug Store
727 North University
Phone 9797

Jewelry and
Watch Repairing
IHALLER'S Jewelry
State at Liberty

=7d

i

II

Place advertisements with Classifiled
Advertising Department. Phone 2-3241.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
for one or two insertions. 10c per read-
ing line for three or more insertions.
(on basis of five average words to line)
Minimum three lines per insertion.
Telephone rate - 15c per reading line
for two or more inssertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
LOST AND FOUND -
FOUND: A pair of glasses at Viola
Stein's, Typist. 706 Oakland. 6327.
554
LARGE white and black Parker pen
Saturday, May 8, 5:30 p.m. on
Union Drive or South University.
Phone 4629. Reward. 546
LOST: Silver initialed Waterman
fountain pen Tuesday between E.
Med. and Union. Reward. Bud,
2-2061. 549
WANTED
QUIET student wishes room (and
meals is possible) for next fall in
private home near medical build-
ing/Box 3.
FRATERNITY cook desires fall posi-
tion. Has excellent references. Call
2-1260. 551
FRATERNITY cook, middle aged,
wants summer work, no laundry.
References. Box 22. 550
QLOTHING WANTED TO BUY: Any
old and new suits, overcoats, at $3,
$5, $8, $25. LADIES' FUR COATS,
TYPEWRITERS, OLD GOLD,
DIAMONDS and musical instru-
ments. Phone Sam. 6304. 78x
FOR RENT
CAMPUS: 3 rooms and sleeping
porch, furnished, modern, electric
refrigeration. Available, June 15.
$50. 2-2786. 555
Read Daily Classified Ads

THREE-ROOM furnished apartment
with private bath. Williams Apart-
ments. 500 E. Williams. Available
June 10 for entire summer or sum-
mer school session. Phone 5916
after 10:30 p.m.
SOUTHEAST section, four furnished
rooms, private bath, refrigerator.
No children. Call mornings, 8:30 to
11 a.m. Phone 2-2829. 552
FOR SALE
COCKER SPANIEL puppies sired by
Ch. Tokalon Grenadier. Beauties,
$25. F. H. Clark. 1109 East Univer-
sity Ave. 556
SACRIFICE beautiful solid black wal-
nut period design dining set. An-
tique walnut desk. New table top
gas range. 203 N. Ingalls. Phone
4786 548
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Box darned.
Careful work at a low price. 6x
1937 Dramatic beason
Last Times TOAY
at 3:15 and 8:155
RAPHHOMES ofThe
"With the pop and fizz
of newly opened wine,
NOEL COWARD'S
"Tonight At
8:30"

2%

''h

!!!

'II

1

Su perior
MILK-ICE CREAM
Week-End Special
VANILLA and FRESH PEACH ICE CREAM
Supe rior Dairy Coimpaiy
Phone 23181

Do you have typing to be done,
or do you want. typing to d-o?.
Or, h*
Or hveyou lost anyhig

4

Now.

G a w CIGN

Matinees 25c
Nights . . 35c

in any case, your best medium

11

is The Michigan Daily
Classified Column

I1.
L

makes a perfect opening
bill."
Opening TOMORROW
MATINEE and Night--
Miss Peggy Wood in
"The Merchant of
Venice"
with GARETH HUGHES
Nights: at 8:15 -- 75c,
$1.10 and $1.50. Mats. at
3:15 --5Oc and 75c.
Box office Phone 6300.

TAW

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lw.

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Now-

--w MFP-

Don is just full of
the devil and
Ann's a delicious
dish..in this ro-
mance spiced with
lau hter! thrills!
an danger!

1 0 IV v W!V
DON AME(HE
ANN SOTHERN

CASH

RATES

--

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lic

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LINE

Friday .Saturday = Sunday
fln.uLhjcs CfevurnmiplNuti Fiudgen'Sundnce

I III U I III Uj~w

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