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September 30, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pollock Tells
Civil Service
Plan's Details
Report In Two Main Parts
Giving Survey Of Present
And Recommendations
That the recently drafted bill to
provide for a system of civil service
in Michigan, proposed by the Civil
Service Commission, will be sub-
mitted to the Legislature in January
by Governor Fitzgerald in case of re-
election was announced yesterday by
Prof. James K. Pollock, chairman of
the Civil Service Commission.
The Commission has just complet-
ed its investigation of existent em-
ployment conditions in the state by
publication of a report of their find-
ings, together with annotations and
advice for amelioration of the situa-
tion. The report consists of two prin-
cipal parts: the survey of existing
personnel practices, and recommen-
dations in form of a civil service bill.
"The survey is presented in order
that the people of the state may be-
come acquainted with the conse-
quences of conducting a modern state
government on a patronage basis,"
said Professor' Pollock. "The bill
recommended by the Commission
after the most thorough considera-
tion, is presented to remedy the exist-
ing abuses, too long tolerated, and
to give the state the best possible
personnel system to the end that
better service shall be rendered to the
citizens."
A provision of the proposed bill
calls for a four-man State Civil
Service Commission, not more than
two of whom shall be members of
any one political party. The purpose
was to find a means, if possible to
.ntirely eliminate politics. With an
odd numbered board it would be pos--
sible for a majority to be members
of one party, opening the door for
the introduction of politics.
Commission To Be Appointed
The Commission is to be appointed
on much the same basis as are the
Board of Regents and the Conserva-
tion Commission, according to Pro-
Iessor Pollock. The members will be
given their expenses, but member-
ship on the commission will not be
"a high-salaried political plum but
will, it is hoped, attract public spir-
ited citizens who will find it attrac-
tive to serve the state in this ca-
pacity."
A State Civil Service Department
is to be in charge of all state em-
ployment, the bill provides. The
head of the department, to be other-
wise known as the Personnel Director,
will be appointed by a three-man
committee named by the Civil Service
Commission. The Director shall not
be removed by the Commission ex-
cept on charges and after a public
hearing by the Conmission.
All elective officials, all department
heads, and all members of boards
and commissions are exempted from
civil service, the bill asserts. Each
such official is permitted to select
one deputy and one secretary with-
out regard to civil service require-
mee~ts. Persons connected with Mich-
igan State College the University of
Michigan, and the judicial system are
also exempted from the application
of the act for constitutional reasons.

Roosevelt Speech Highlights

Radio Station
Being Planned

(Continued from Page 1)

have not been content merely to de-
nounce this menace. We have beer
realistic enough to face it. We hav
'been intelligent enough to do some-
thing about it. And the world ha<
seen the results of what we have done
In the spring of 1933 we faced
a crisis which was the ugly fruit o
twelve years of neglect of the causes
of economic and social unrest. It wa
a crisis made to order for all those
who would overthrow our form o
government.
Do I need to recall to you the
fear of those days-the reports o
f those who piled supplies in their
basements, who laid plans to gel
their fortunes across the border, who
got themselves hideaways in the
ccuntry against the impending up-
heaval?
Starvation Averted
Do I need to recall the law-abiding
heads of peaceful families, who be-
gan to wonder, as they saw their
children starve, how they could ge
the bread they saw in the bakery
window?
Do I need to recall the homeless
boys who were traveling in bands
through the country seeking work
and food-desperate because they
could find neither?
Do I need to recall the farmers
who banded together with pitchforks
to keep the sheriff from selling the
farm home under foreclosure? Do I
need to recall the powerful leaders
of industry and banking who came
to me in Washington in those early
days of 1933 pleading to be saved?
Most people in the United States
remember today the fact that star-
vation was averted, that homes and
farms were saved, that banks were
re-opened, that crop prices rose, that
industry revived and the dangerous
forces subversive of our form of gov-
ernment were turned aside.
A few people-a few only-unwill-
ing to remember, seem to have for-
gotten those days.
Reaction Provokes Radicalism
In the summer of 1933, a nice old
gentleman, wearing a silk hat, fell
off the end of a pier. He was un-
able to swim. A friend ran down
the pier, dived overboar dand pulled
him out, but the silk hat floated off
with the tide. After the old gentle-
man had been resuscitated he was
profuse in his thanks. He praised his
friend for saving his life. Today,
three years later, the bld gentleman
is berating his friend because the
silk hat was lost.
Why did the crisis of 1929 to 1932
pass without disaster?
The answer is found in the record
of what we did. Early in the cam-
paign of 1932 I said: "To meet by
reaction that danger of radicalism is
to invite disaster. Reaction is n
barrier to the radical-it is a chal-
lenge, a provocation. The way to
meet that danger is to offer a work-
able program of reconstruction, and
the party to offer it is the party with
clean hands."
We met the emergency action. But
far more important than that, we
went to the roots of the problem and
attacked the cause of the crisis. We
were against revolution. Therefore,
we waged war against those condi-
tions which make revolutions-
against the inequalities and resent-
ments which breed them.
In Amercia in 1933 the people did
not attempt to remedy wrongs by
overthrowing their institutions,
Americans were made to realize that
wrongs could and would 'be set right
within their institutions. We proved
that Democracy can work.
Evasion, Neglect, Ignorance
I have said that there is a very
great differneces between the two
parties in what they do about com-
munism. Conditions congenial to
communism were being bred and
fostered throughout this nation up
to the very day of March 4, 1933.
Hunger was breeding it. Loss of
homes and farms was breeding it.
- -- -________----- -- '''-________ --.''-

FrAn Arbor
Closing banks were breeding it. AoArbor
ruinous price level was breeding it. 1 o I n i
Discontent and fear were spreading
through the land. The previous na- Faculty And Business Men
tionai administration, bewildered, did
nothing. Apply To Federal Gov't
In their speeches they deplored it For 1,000 Watt Station
but by their actions they encouraged
it. The injustices, the inequalities, Establishment of a local broadcast-
the downright suffering out of which ing station here by the end of the
revolutions come--what did they do ng tation he.reby thnd-of th--

~EVENING RADIO
PROGRAMS
6:00-WJR Stevenson News.
wwJ Ty Tyson; Dinner Hour (6:10).
WXYZ March of Melody.
CKLW Phil Marley's Music.
6:15-WJR Rubinoff-Peerce.
WXYZ Fact Finder.
CKLW News and Sports.
6:30-WJR Jimmie Allen.
WWJ Bulletins.
WXYZ Day in Review.
CKLW Vincent York's Music.
6:45-WJR Renfrew of the Mounted.
WWJ Three Scamps.
WXYZ Lowell Thomas.
i CKLW Kevboard Twins.

9:15-CKLW Viennese Vagbonds.
9:30-WJR Come On, Let's Sing.
WXYZ American Hospital Program,
CKLW Viennese Vagabonds.
9 :45-CKLW Mullens Sis.ters.
10 :00-WJR Gangbusters.
WWJ Your Hit Parade.
WXYZ This is Paris.
CKLW Witches Tales.
10:30-WJR Democratic National Con-
mittee.
WXYZ Lloyd Huntley's Music.
CKLW bloyd Huntley's Music.
10:45-WJR Musical Program.
WXYZ Lowry Clark's Music.
CKLW Phil Marley's Music.
11:00-WJR News.
WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Henry Busse's Music.
CKLW Trans-Radio; Freddy Martin's
Music.
11:15-WJR Moods in Music.
WXYZ Ink Spots.
CKLW Mystery Lady.
11:30--WWJ Dance Music.
WXYZ Phil Ohmnan's Music.
CKLW Joe Sander's Music.
11:45-WJR Lions Tales.
12:00--WJR Dick Stabile's Music.
WWJ Dance Music.

WXYZ Shandor: Jack Douglas' Music.
CKLW Cab Calloway's Music.
1:30 WJR Benny Goodman's Music.
WXYZ Luigi Romanelli's Music.
CKL W Horace Heidt's Music.
'CKLW Joe Sander' sMusic.
STU DENT
SUPPLIES
Notebook Refills
Half-Pound Package
filer Drug Store
727 North University

' _.,,, ..sue....,..,, .,., ..., .. ..,,,, ,.. . ,.., .. .,

s about these things? Lacking cour-
age, they evaded. Being selfish, they
f neglected. Being short sighted they
ignored. When the crisis came-as
f these wrongs made it sure to come
-America was unprepared.
Our lack of preparation for it was
t best proved by the cringing and the
fear of the very people whose indif-
freence helped to make the crisis.
They came to us pleading that we
should do, overnight, what they
should have been doing through the
years.
And the simple causes of our un-
preparedness were two: first, a weak
t leadership, and, secondly, an in-
ability to understand the reasons for
social unrest-the tragic plight of
90 per cent of the men, women and
children who made up the popula-
tion of the United States.
Republicans Lack Comprehension
It has been well said- the most
dreadful failure of which any form
of government can be guilty is simply
to lose touch with reality, because
out of this failure all imaginable
forms of evil grow. Every empire
that has crashed has come down
primarily because its rulers didn't
know what was going on in the
world and were incapable of learn-
nig."
It is for that reason that our Amre-
ican form of government will con-
tinue to be safest in Democratic
hands. The real, actual, undercover
Republican leadership is the same as
it was four years ago. That leader-
ship will never comprehend the needs
for a program of social justice and of
regard for the well-being of the
masses of our people.
* * *
Let me warn you and let me warn
the nation against the smooth evasive
which says: "Of course we believe
all these things, we believe in social
security; we believe in work for the
unemployed; we believe in saving
homes. Cross our hearts and hope
to die, we believe in all these things;
but we do not like the way the pres-
ent administration is doing them.
Just turn them over to us. We will
do all of them-we will do more of
them-we will do them better; and,
most important of all, the doing of
them will not cost anybody any-
thing."
Against Job Being Done
But my friends, these evaders are
banking too heavily on the shortness
of our memories. No one will forget
that they had their golden oppor-
tunity-12 long years of it.
Remember that the first essential
of doing a job well is to want to see
the job done. But make no mistake
aout this: the Republican leader-
ship today is not against the way we
have done the job. The Republican
leadership is against the job being
done.I
* * *i
The same lack of purpose of ful-
filment lies behind the promises of
today. You can not be an old guard
Republican in the East, and a New
Deal Republican in the West. You
can not promise to repeal taxes be-c
fore one audience and promise toI
spend more of the taxpayers money
before another audience. You can-i
not promise tax relief for those whoI
can afford to pay, and, at the same;
time, promise more of the taxpayers'
money for those who are in need.
You simply can not make good on
both promises at the same time.
A Liberal Conservative
Who is there in America who be-
lieves that we can run the risk of
turning back our government to the
old leadership which brought it to
the brink of 1933? Out of the strains
and stresses of these years we now
come to see that the true conservative
is the man who has a real concern
for injustices and takes thought
against the day of reckoning. The
true conservative seeks to protect the
system of private property and free
enterprise by correcting such injus-
tices and inequalities as arise from

it. The most serious threat to our
institutions comes from those who
refuse to face the need for change.
Liberalsim becomes the protection
for the far-sighted conservative.
Never has a nation made greater
strides in the safe-guarding of De-
mocracy than we have made during
the past three years. Wise and pru-
dent men-intelligent conservatives
-have long known that in a chang-
ing world worthy institutions can be
conserved only by adjusting them
to the changing time. In the words
of the great essayist-"The voice of
great events is proclaiming to us-
reform if you would preserve."
I am that kind of a conservative
because I am that kind of a liberal.
Magazines

I

semester was foreseen yesterday by y W.
E7:00-WJR William Hard.
Ann Arbor business men and faculty WWJ Amos and Andy.
members who have incorporated a WXYZ Easy Aces.
,i cCKLW String Trio.
commercial company. Prof. Waldo 7:15--WJR Popeye the Sailor,
Abbot, director of the University WWJ Evening Melodies.
Broadcasting Service, heads the CKLW BilleienePs Music.
group who have applied to the Fed- 7:30-WJR Goose Creek Parson.
erl RadioConfo. WWJ Studio Feature.
ral ommission for a license WXYZ Lone Ranger.
Although a site for the proposed CKLW Variety Revue.
7:45-WJR Boake Carter.
studio has not been definitely de- CKLW Word Wonderland.
termined, the transmitters and an- 8.00-WJR Cavalcade of America.
WWJ One Man's Family.
tennae will be set up on a well-known WXYZ Revue de Paree.
dairy farm near here. The applica- CKLW Horace Heidt's Music.
tion asks for a 1,000 watt station to Kings Music.
operate on 1,550 kilocycles. The sta- WWJ Wayne King's Music.
tion will be used for experimental and CKLW Music Box Revue.
research purposes in high fidelity and 9 :00-WJR Nine Martini: Andre Kostel-
high frequency. As such, it will be WWJ Town Hali Tonight.
utilized by the electrical engineering WXYZ Bandmaster Review.
department of the University, al-
though the proposed station has no MARTIAL LAW FOR PALESTINE
financial or executive affliiations LONDON, Sept. 29.-QP)-Great
with the University, but is an inde- Britain today decreed martial law for
pendent company. Palestine to subdue a six-month up-
Professor Abbot pointed out that rising of Arabs against Jewish immi-
this will not be the first broadcasting gration and land ownership.
station in Ann Arbor, as in 1923 the Terrorism in the Holy Land has
University owned a wave length and cost more than 200 lives since the
broadcasted programs under the call Arabs declared a "general strike" last
letters WCBC. When the Regents April to resist provisions of the Brit-
were unwilling to finance necessary ish mandate over Palestine, which
additions to equipment, the venture I many of the country's 700,000 Arabs
was given up. ( never recognized.
Two other proposed radio stations --- -
here have been withdrawn by their
sponsors, one of whom was Harry MICH IGAN SEAL
Kipke, leaving the present station
alone in the field. The venture is WR IT ING PAPER
sponsored by the Chamber of Com-
merce and other Ann Arbor organi- 9
zations, and is strictly local in make-- vC andaV
up, although it is expected that it will
ultimately become associated with per package
the Michigan Radio Network. A
commercial station, it will also carry
numerous sustaining programs pre- Miller Drug Store
pared by classes in broadcasting. It 727 North University
will be a full time station.

i
i

Fro A R BOR to

In as much as its power will be 20
kilocycles instead of 10, experiments
will be undertaken which are expect-
ed to add to thestore of knowledge in
radio engineering, according to Pro-
fessor Abbot.I
Winant Replies
To Gov. Landon
In Radio Talk
WASHINGTON, Sept. 29.-(/P)-
Replying to Governor Landon's crit-
icism of the Social Security Act, John
G. Winant-twice Republican Gov-
ernor of New Hampshire - upheld
that law tonight, saying "an ad-
vance has begun-and no man has
a right to call 'halt'."
In a national broadcast, which he
resigned from the Social Security
Board to make, Winant stipulated
that he was speaking "personally, as
a private citizen."
Referring to Landon only as "the
Republican candidate," Winant said
he had hoped until the Kansan's
Milwaukee speech "that the attain-
ment of social security would be held
high above partisan politics."
"The call to retreat is written large
in the whole tissue of the Republican
position."
HALLER'S
State and Liberty
Watch Repairing!

FOU NTAI'N
PENS
Nationally-Advertised Makes

Day
Stationi-
TIo -
Station
Rate

,III
, AN
Y I
4k
I v. v
4 F
!M1 ills...
t

Wahl-Eversharp,
Parker, Waterman
and Others
Priced
$100
and up
A large and complete
assortment.
SERVICE WORK
a Specialty
Student and
Office Supplies
Correspondence
Stationery

Cleveland, . ..
Chicago, I1. ..
New York, No Y. .
Pittsburg, Pa,
Washington, ).C.
St. Lonis, Mo. . .
Alma .........
Battle Creek ... .
Benton Harbor .
Petoskey......
Grand Rapis . .
Hillsdale......
Flint . .... .. .
Grand Havel. . .
Kalamazoo ..'
M skegon . . . . .
Port Huron ....
$t. Johns ......
Lansing . . . . .' . .
Saginaw' . .. .
Marqpette. . . . .
Mt. Pleasant . .

... $ .40
. . . 1.05
... .1.90
.... 110-+
.... 1.60
. .,. .L70
.65
. .. . .60
.90
...L. 10

I

Night
and
Sunday
Station-
To-
Station
Rate
$ .40
.60
1.10
.65
.95
1.05
.35
.35
.50
.65
.40
.35
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.45
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.85
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. . .

SHAVING CREAMS
TOOTH PASTE
TOOTH BRUSH ES
Miller Drug Store
727 North University

I1

' ' ' -

.80
.45
.45
.85
.70
.90
.60
.4"5
.6()
IL40
.75

0. D. Morrill
314 S. State St.
Since 1903 Phpne 6615
If You Write, We Have It

. e a .
,e

own

__
(!

!I

. . . .0

Engineers' and Architects'
Materials

Stationery, Fountain Pens, Loose-Leaf
Notebooks
Typewriting and Pound Papers
College Pennants and Jewelry
Leather Goods
Typewriters, New and Used Books
STUDENTS

What
Business
Offers
to the

1-1

These rates are for the first 3-minute talking
period, and are subject to Federal tax where
the charge is 50c or more. 'hey are in effect
every night from 7 P. M. until 4:30 A. M.
Also from 7 P. M. every Saturday night until"
4:30 A. M. Monday. Rates to other points are
correspondingly low. Ask "Long Distance".
MICHBEP N E C

H igh School Graduate
USINESS, as a career, offers the High School Grad-
uate more opportunities, greater possibilities for large
earnings, and quicker returns than any other vocation.
With a High School diploma as a foundation, plus
specialized technical training, the young man or young
woman of ability can make rapid advancement.
HAMIILTON

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Hil

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