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April 26, 1936 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1936-04-26

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PAGE TWO TiltMTCHAN DATIX

SUNDAY, APRIL 26, 1934

Festival History
Since 1888 Is
Long, Colorful
Huge Undertaking Grew
Out of Modest Beginning
43 Years Ago
(Continued from Page x)
works for choral performance, includ-
ing many operas adapted to concert
presentation, have been given by the
Choral Tnion. In numerous cases,
American and world premieres have
taken place. During the same period
practically all of the world's import-
ant soloists, instrumental and vocal,
have been heard, including luminaries
from the Metropolitan Opera Associa-
tion and other American Opera Com-
panies, as well as the great opera
houses of Europe.
The Festival of 1936 will witness
the appearance of another orchestra.
Leopold Stokowski and the Phila-
delphia Orchestra will be injected in-
to the Festival program. Their trans-
continental deluxe tour has attracted
wide attention. Through a fortunate
combination of circumstances, it was
made possible to induce them to route
their tour in such a way as to make
possible four days in Ann Arbor. Dr.
Stokowski will conduct two programs.

Notes On May Festival Personalities

The boast that tiny, brunette Lily
Pons has a soprano voice that is flaw-
less in its beauty is not an idle one.
Her range is two and one-half oc-
taves, and in "Lucia di Lammermoor,'
the opera in which she made her
Metropolitan debut, the much dis-
cussed high note of the Mad Scene
as Miss Pons sings it, is F, a whole+
tone higher than it is usually sung.
Incidentally it was through acci-
dent that Miss Pons took up voice,1
for she had originally set out to
became a pianist. During the war it1
was her custom to play for the wound-1
ed in the hospitals of Paris. One;
day, by chance, she included a song
in her program. After that the men'
would listen patiently to her rendi-
tions of Bach and Debussy, and then
would say, "Now sing us something."
Gradually the idea of a piano career
suffered eclipse, and little Miss Pons
decided to be a singer.
* *
The widely-heralded cross-conti-,
nental tour of the Philadelphia Sym-
phony orchestra, is rapidly becoming
an event which Barnum could claim 1
as his idea. A special, ten-car, air-1
conditioned train has been arranged:
for the tour and will transport the
orchestra from city to city in trulyl
elegant style. It takes five cars to'
house the musicians, and Dr. Sto-1
kowski, his associate conductors, and

three women of the orchestra will oc- began to think seriously of cultivat
cupy the car of honor. The precious ing his voice,
instruments worth aquarter of a mil-

lion dollars, will be carefully cradled
in two other cars, and will rest in!
specially constructed and padded
trunks. Still another car will be
equipped with shower baths. A large
circulating library of fiction and biog-
raphy, special closets for full-dress
suits and gymnastic apparatus, will
be among the miscellaneous conven-
iences of the train, which will com-
bine the comforts of home with the
best features of a luxury-liner and
a general store.
Charles O'Connell, brilliant young
Irish associate conductor of the or-
chestra, has the distinction of being
the first certist to make a successful
electrical recording of the organ. t
* * '
There's a wide gulf between engi-
neering and music, but Julius Huehn,
prominent baritone who will appear
in Elgar's "Caractacus," can tell you
that it is not insurmountable. As a
boy he spent his summers working C
in his father's steel plate mill, and
intent upon his chosen profession,
he entered the Carnegie Institute of
Technology. It was only when he
began to play the saxophone in a
small school dance orchestra that he*

Besides being a brilliant baritone,
Keith Falkner has received recog-
nition in an entirely different field
in military service. During the war
he joined the Royal Naval Air Serv-
ice and became a pilot of seaplanes
in the summer of 1918. It was just
at this time that the German sub-
marine attack was most intense, and
Falkner was awarded the Royal Hu-
mane Society's bronze medal by the
British government for life saving at
sea. Though he came through the
war unscathed, he did have a danger-
out experience that, strangely enough,
almost cost him his life at the hands
of England's ally, France. He was,
flying over France and had to make
a forced landing behind the French
lines. However, he was without iden-
tification papers, and was mistaken
for a German because he was wearing
a dark blue uniform. Finally a friend-
ly-looking French girl who spoke
English intervened and made the
necessary explanations to the excited
French soldiers.
Saul Caston, associate conductor of
the Philadelphia Symphony, comes
from a long line of musicians. To a1
great-great-grandfather is attributedj
the invention of the xylophone, a fact
which the present generation of Cas-
tons are apt to gloss over hastily.
In 1896 Russian opera-goers were
astounded to see a nine-year-old boy
valiantly and success fully wielding
a bow as first violinist in a grand
opera orchestra. The boy was none
other than Efrem Zimbalist, who will
bring his violin to the Ann Arbor May
Festival for the pleasure of Ann Ar-
bor concert-goers. The orchestra was
his father's, but it was not paternal
favoritism that was responsible for
the boy's appearance. His father was
very unwilling to give him the op-
portunity to play, but the other mu-
sicians were so insistent that he fi-
nally gave in.
Both Mavs ro SIokowski and As-r
sociate Conductor Charles O'Connell
firmly adhere to the theory that a

Famous Choral
Works Offered
lIn Past Years
Several World, Ainerican
Premn icres Featured In
Previouis Festivals
The list of choral works which
have been performed by May Festivals
of former years has reached imposing
proportions, and it includes not only
world-famous works whose fame has
been permanently established, but
premieres of new works by distin-
guishedcomposers.
The "Manzoni Requiem" by Verdi
has proven to be one of the most
popular chorals works to be given
during the 43 years of the May Festi-
val's existence, and as a proof of
its popularity, it was selected for the
sixth time to be presented at this
year's Festival. It was presented at
the first annual May Festival which
was given in 1894, again in 1897, in.
1913, 1921, and 1930.
Elgar's "Caractacus," the other
choarl work which will be heard at
this year's Festival, has also been
heard several times in previous Festi-
1vals.
Last year's Festival presented world
premieres of two important choral
works, Lear's "Jumblies," a children's
cantata, and Hanson's "Drum Taps."
In former years May Festival concert-
goers have heard world premieres of
Hanson's opera "Merry Mount," and
his "Heroic Elegy," and Moore's "Voy-
age of Arion."
baton should never be used in con-
ducting an orchestra. "The baton is
superfluous in conducting," says Mr.
O'Connell, "The hands and arms are
much more eloquent and expressive
without the artificial extension, of
stick. Originally the baton was used
to beat time; but now beating time
is the least important concern of theI
conductor. The communication of
certain ideas and emotions to his men
is his ma jor duty. His is chiefly. a
job of interpretation and integra-
tion."

To Sing Ir;'Requiem,

KEITH FALKNER

Two Directors
Will Be Heard
With Stokowski
r
Star Conductor To Lead
First Concert; Cas ton,
O'Connell OnFriday
(Continued froiPage 1)
The Fire Bird and Her Dance, Dance
of the Princesses, Kastchei's Infer-
nal Dance, terceuse, and Finale.
Mr. Caston, who is also a dis-
tinguished trumpeter, was engaged
by Dr. Stokowski when he was only
16 years old as a second trumpeter
with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Five
years later he was promoted to first
trumpeter. His first opportunity to
conduct the orchestra came at a
summer concert at Robin Hood hall
in 1931 when the scheduled guest
conductor, Albert Coates, became ill.
On the spur of the moment, 'Mr. Cas-
ton picked up the baton and conduct-
ed the concert so successfully that
he has acted as conductor in the
summer concerts ever since. At the
present he also directs a miniature
symphony orchestra in his spare time,
"The Philadelphia Orchestra En-
semble."
The other associate conductor of
the Philadelphia orchestra, Mr.
O'Connell is also an author of note,
having written "The Victor Book of
the Symphonies," a book which was
selected by William Lyon Phelps as
one of the best works of 1935. Born
in New England, Mr. O'Connell had
the good fortune to became a protege
of the great pianist, Ossip Gabrilo-
witsch,who sent him to New York
to study under Frederic Mariner. For
three years after he finished his
studies, he acted as organist at his
alma mater, Holy Cross College, and
in 1928 went to Europe to study with
the famous French organist, Charles
Marie Wido. It was while he was in
France that he was initiated into 'the
business of being a conductor. An-
other field in which Mr. O'Connell
has been active is that of orchestra-
tion. His arrangements of Bach,
Purcell, Handel, Debussy, and Turina
will be played by the Philadelphia
orchestra on this tour.
HA

Schedule of

Perormances..
I. WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8:30
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI, Conductor
Toccata and Fugue in D minor ... . ..............Bach
Aria ............................................ Bach
Fugue in G minor ;e... . ... . . ........ ..............Bach
Come, Sweet Death .............. .............. Bach
Passacaglia...................................Bach
Prelude to "The Mastersingers"................Wagner
Prelude to "Lohengrin" ......................Wagner
"Tristan und Isolda" Love Music .............. Wagner
1I. THURSDAY EVENING, 8:30,
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CARACT ACUS, A Dramatic Cantata............. Elgar
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano............EIGEN
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor..................ORBIN
KEITH FALKNER, Baritone ............CARACTACUS
ARCH-DRUID
JULIUS HUEHN, Bass................A BARD
CLAUDIUS
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
SYNOPSIS
Scene 1. Eigen, Orbin, Caractacus, and Chorus
Scene 2. Orbin, Arch-Druid, Caractacus, and Chorus
Scene 3. Eigen, Orbin, and Chorus
Scene 4. Eigen, Caractacus, and Chorus
Scene 5. A Bard and Druid Maidens
Scene 6. Eigen, Orbin, Caractacus, Claudius, and Chorus.
III. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
ORCHESTRAL ACCOMPANIMENT
HAROLD BAUER, Pianist
SAUL CASTON and EARL V. MOORE, Conductors
Overture to "Russlan and Ludmilla ............... Glinka
The Children at Bethlehem ................:...Pierne
A Mysterdy in Two Parts for Soli, Chorus of Children
and Orchestra
Concerto No. 5 in E flat for Piano and Orchestra... . .
........................................Beethoven
HAROLD BAUER
Mr. Bauer Uses the Baldwin Piano
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:30
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
LILY PONS, Soprano
CHARLES O'CONNELL and SAUL CASTON, Conductors
Overture to "Marriage of Figaro".. .............Mozart
Arias, from "Magic Flute"..................... Mozart
Pamina's Air
Queen of the Night
LILY PONS
Symnphony No. 1 in C major Op. 21...... . :.. Beethoven
Adagio molto - Allegro con brio
Andante cantabale con moto
Menuetto: Allegro molto e vivace; Trio
Finale: Adagio-Allegro molto c vivace
Canope .................................... Debussy
Minstrels.............................Debussy
Orchestrated by Charles O'Connell
Aria, "Bell Song" from "Lakme"..............Delibes
LILY PONS
Choral and Fugue .................. Zemachsen
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist
LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI, Conductor
Symphony No. 1 in C minor..................lrihms
Un poco sostenuto - Allegro
Andante sostenuto
An poco allegretto e grazioso
Adagio, piu andante - Allegro non troppo, ma con brio
Concerto in D minor for Violin and Orchestra , . . Sibelius
Allegro moderato
Adagio di molto
Allegro ma non tanto
EFREM ZIMBALIST

GI(OVANNI MARTINELLI
CONCERT HOURS ANNOUNCED
Concerts will begin on Eastern
St a(ar l d Hime, which is one hour
faster than Ann Arbor railroad time.
Evening concerts at 8:30 p.m. and
afternoon concerts at 2:30 p.m.

4

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J

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CS

J7

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..... - --- ---

NOTICE
THE PRiCES OF SEASON TICKETS (Six Con-
certs) are $6.00, $7.00, and $8.00, and if "Festival
(oupoii" is returned, the prices are reduced to
$.00, $4.00, aid $5.00, respectively. Orders filed
andtiilled i sequence.

li

I -ARTISTS

GROUPS

Liy PONS.............
Metropolitan Opera
JEAXNNETTE VREELAND
American Oratorio Artist
ROSE I3AMP'TONV...,...
Metropolitan Opera
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI
Metropolitan Opera

Sol) ao
sopraiio
Ten-or
I-ir.
B3arionie

pAUL AuTouSE
Metropolitan Opera
KEiuiitH -FALKNER
Metropolitan Opera
JULIUS HUEHN
British Oratorio Artist
EIFREM ZIMIBALIST
Prince of Violilists
H1A ROLI BAUvi..
M a~t cr Art; 5t;

'1 'i U N IV S IT-Y CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
and CASTON & CHARLES O'CONNELL,
111 Ii- HiL ADELPH IA ORCHESTRA '
L EOciOaLc ST'OiOWSK, CondCor
TI II You NG PEOPLE'S CTORUS
1UVA IIGIULE, Cwditc/or

I

...... arione
Violi/list

i
I

Thre Bird of Fire......................i-
iutroduction
The Fire Bird and 11er Dance
Dance of the Princesses
Kastche's Inferial Dauce
Berceuse
Finale
VI. SATURDAY EVENING, 8:30
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
SOLOISTS
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano
ROSE BAMPTON, Contralto
GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, Tenor
KEITH FALKNER, Bass
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organit
P ARL V. MOORE, Conductor
M'aht10n Requiem" .... .... .. ....
For Soli, Chorus, Orchestra, and Organ
1, Requiem e Kyie 5. Agnus Di
2, Dies Irac 6. Lux Aeterna
3. Domine Jesu 7. Libera Me
4. Sanctus

pALMER( CHRIST IAN
University Organist

Urganils

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CHFORAL IW ORKS

Verdi

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CAACl -' ~ >C1TS

4 a < s0 a a a s s u . 4 a +

* ELGAR
* OVERD

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_M 1ANZONI 4EQIJ I E Iee

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