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February 19, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WAGE TWO

THE MICHIGEAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1939

._._. .. i

War Veterans,
In Revolt, Take
Over Paraguay
Provisional Government Is
Set Up; President Ayala
Sends In Resignation
ASUNCION, PARAGUAY, Feb. 18.
- VP) - Jungle-hardened veterans of
the war with Bolivia today set up a
provisional government in Paraguay
and forced President Esebio Ayala
to resign.
Ayala, who had fled from his place
after loyal police lost a hard battle
which raged all day yesterday
through the streets of the capital,
submitted his resignation by radio
from the gunboat Paraguay on which
he had taken refuge.
The message of resignation was ad-
dressed to Col. Camilo Recalde, lead-
er of the revolutionaries, who with
his followers proclaimed the war vet-
erans' hero, Col. Rafael Franco, pro-
visional president of Paraguay.
Permitted To Land
Recalde then permitted Ayala to
land from the gunboat and return
to his residence with full guarantees.
The rebels, headed by Colonel
Smith and Colonel Recalde, veterans
of the Chaco War, emerged victorious
from a series of street battles yester-
day with loyal forces.
Foreign Minister Luis Riart, ar-
rested by the revolutionaries, was
held prisoner in the aviation school,
the members of which - like the ma-
jority of the military forces in Asun-
cion - joined the rebels.
Colonel Franco, Chaco War hero
who was dismissed from the army
and exiled by the previous civilian
government in connection with al-
leged communistic activities, was at
his seat of exile in Buenos Aires, Ar-
gentina, and was expected to return
soon.
Troops Surrender
Troops which supported the gov-
ernment when the rebellion burst in-
to the open yesterday, surrendered
unconditionally at 10:00 p.m. last
night to the revolutionary leaders.
The chiefs of the revolution as-
sumed absolute control of the situa-
tion, with military units quartered
outside Asuncion, as well as those
within the capital, now obeying their
orders.
The military rebellion arose in the
aftermath of the Gran Chaco war-
fare between Paraguay and Bolivia,
one group of Paraguayan militarists
having expressed dissatisfaction over'
the terms under which the civilian
government agreed to halt hostilities.
Hockey Six Downs
St. Thomas, 12 To 5
(Continued from Page i)

Motor Magnate Dead

Plans Pushed
To Give City
Softer Water
Purchase Of Plant Site
Given Final Approval
By Council Vote
The city council of Ann Arbor voted
final approval of the purchase of a
site for the new water softening plant
Monday night. The acquisition of
the site, directly west of the present
reservoir at the end of Sunset Itoad,
will involve $10,000.
Acting on their promise made to
Mayor Robert A. Campbell last Oc-
tober, that the city payrolls would be
raised as soon as the city was out of
the red, the council last night voted
an increase in salary of five per cent
for all city employees. An audit of
the city's books two weeks ago re-
vealed that Ann Arbor was out of the
red for the first time in three years,
and in six months might even be
$50,000 ahead.
A motion by Alderman Wirt Mas-
ten that City Clerk Fred Perry and
City Attorney William Laird be em-
powered to collect from the Home
Packing Company meat inspection
fees in default for the past two
months was unanimously approved.
Alderman Masten revealed that the
packing firm was nearly $100 in de-
fault on a bill of $240 for the past
two months, having declared that it
would pay no more because it was
"not in sympathy with the ordi-
nance."
The motion provided that meat in-
spection for the firm should cease if
payment were not forthcoming in two
days.
The controversy over the exchange
of the city's waterworks Park prop-
erty for the Board of Education's
strip on Thayer Street in back of Ann
Arbor High again reached a check-
mate when Alderman Leigh J.
Young's resolution, calling for ex-
change with a provision that Water-
works Park should be used for no
other purpose than playground or
school, was defeated 9-5, ° and the
matter referred back to committee.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
kdvertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
)clock previous to day of insertion.
Box niumbers may be secured at on
'xtra charge.
Gash in advance 11e per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions. 10c
per reading line for three or more
insertions. Minimum 3 lines per in-
sertion.
relephone rate -15c per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
O101 discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.
6y contract, per line -2 lines daily,
one month. .... ............8c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ........8
2 lines daily, college year ......7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ..... 8c
100 lines used as desired . .9c
300 lines used as desired.........8
1,000 iines used as desired.......
2.000 lines used as desired.......6
The above rates are per reading line
based on eight reading lines per inch
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
5c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
*c per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 7% point
typeE
FOR RENT - ROOMS

FOR RENT: Desirable suite and
single rooms for rent. 615 Monroe.
Next to Chi Psi house. 310
ROOM for two men. Large pleasant
room, third floor, double-deck,
single beds. 2 closets, 2 chiffoniers.
Shower bath with separate room
for lavatory and toilet. "A bargain
for the second semester. See care-
taker, forenoon. 521 Walnut. 4
312
FOR RENT: Rooms. One single. One
double and one suite. 514 E. Jeffer-
son St. 313
SUITE with private bath and shower
for three men. Additional single if
group of four. Steam heat. Dial
8544. 422 E. Washington. 308
FOR RENT: Rooms for women grad-
uate students. 820 East Washing-
ton. Phone 2-2394. 302
LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. Ix

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Alpha Omega fraternity pin
between Den and 625 Forest. Re-
ward. Phone 2-2861. 316
LOST: Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity
pin. Reward. Call Seingold. 2-1682.
300
LOST: One white gold wedding ring,
one Theta. Phi Alpha sorority pin,
one University nurse's training
school pin. Call Union Desk. 298
LOST: Brown Gladstone suitcase,
corner Washtenaw and South Uni-
versity. Reward. Robert Emmett.
Phone 5343. 303
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Library of English
classics. 10c to 75c per volume.
Many bargains to choose from. 1505
S. University. 7-9:30 p.m. 318
WANTED
WANTED: An odd ski or a good sec-
ond hand pair. Call 3687. 320
WANTED: A flat-top student desk.
Phone 2-2891. 314

NOTICES
ONE THIRD OFF on all fur work.;
E. L. !Gre-6nbaumi. 448 Spring Street.
Phone 9625. 14x
FOR BETTER FOOD. Choice meats.
Fresh vegetables. Home made des-
sorts, 13 meals $3.65. Try Slade's.
608 Hill" Street near State. 306
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist. U. of M.
graduate, 44 years practice. 549
Packard. Phone 2-1866. 13x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and typewrit-
ers. Don't sell before you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
lox
attlewsStudying
Pacific Coast Wood
Investigating public and private
forest management practices, Prof.
Donald M. Matthews, of the School
of Forestry and Conservation, on sab-
batical leave, is now on the Pacific
Coast in the pine and redwood re-
gions. He is working at headquarters
of the University of California.
Professor Matthews will move to
the Gulf Coast for a similar study
of the southern pine region.

-Associated Press Photo
Roy D. Chapin, 55, president of
the Hudson Motor Car Company
and secretary of commerce in the
Hoover administration, died of
pneumonia Sunday in Detroit.
Nearing Offers
Communism As
'The Way Out'
(Continued from Page 1)
¢own Rotary club than one of the
most active Communists in the coun-
try, told with a smile of his difficulties
in finding a place to speak. "There
is less and less freedom in America,"
Dr. Nearing said, "and it is harder
and harder for a liberal or a "radical
to find a place to speak. The Amer-
ican Legion and Daughters of the
American Revolution see that you
don't get buildings, and if you at-
tempt to speak in the street, the
police run you in."
But he admitted that his life is a
"gay adventure." You never know
what's going to happen next," he said.
Students in colleges and univer-
sities, however, Dr. Nearing believes,
are becoming more liberal all the
time. "Such organizations as this are
evidences of it, and it is an encour-
aging sign."
Dr. Nearing believes that a revolu-
tion will have to be abrupt and vio-
lent. It amuses him, he said, to talk
of Communist violence in a "period
when there is so much capitalistic
violence," and it is his opinion that
the social disruption caused by a
revolution "will not be more serious
than the present chaos."
"To illustrate his point he referred
to a house which has gotten so dilap-
idated that it is beyond repair, and
the only course of action open is to
tear it down and build anew. He
thinks that Fabian Socialists are
really wasting their time," although
if they could obtain their objective,
that would be fine."
He held that Communism does not
destroy individual freedom and even
declared that "there is more freedom
in Russia than under capitalism." He
differed sharply with Philip Adler,
Detroit News correspondent in Russia,
who, in a recent speech here, de-
scribed the Russian dictatorship as a
place where the individual had little
if any political or economic freedom.

FOR RENT: Double rooms. Clean and
warm. Running hot water. 411 N.
State Street. 319
A NICE warm front room. Two win-
dows. Completely furnished. 336
John St. Phone 2-1626. 421
BOY'S ROOM for rent. Front, single
with dormitory privilege. 1010 For-
est. 316
COMFORTABLE single room in a
quiet house. 715 E. Ann. Phone
6735. 317
FOR RENT: Single room, one block
from campus. 520 Thompson.
Phone 7758. 309
GOOD front room. Double or single.
509 S. Division. 296
LARGE warm suite for one or two
students. One block from Engi-
neering Building. Reasonable. 1118
S. University. Phone 3743. 311

!'

MA

Iia

Till,

I

HI LL AUDITORUM. at 8:15
TONI GHT
THE TIMELY AND THRILLING STORY
"Ethiopia's Death Struggle"
AS SEEN BY

I

5,000 Students Enter Library
Each Day As Circulation Leaps

I

JO)SEF

ISRAEL

Approximately 5,000 persons enter
the Main Library every day, statis-
tics compiled by the Library staff
show, and the student body is using
the Library far more than was the
case a few years ago, William W.
Bishop emphasized in his annual re-
port to the Board of Regents.
It is probable, Dr. Bishop states,
that at least seven-tenths of the stu-
dent body are in one or more of the
University Libraries daily for a con-
siderable time, according to the sta-
tistics taken on April 29 and May 7 of
the 1934-35 school year.
Furthermore, Dr. Bishop states, the
Library is used much more in the
winter than in any other time of the
year. "If the counts had been made
in January, there is no question that
the figures gathered would have been
greatly enlarged, the report says.
The total circulation of the books
in the library also showed a great
increase over that of 1933-34 and
almost equals the number of volumes
in all the libraries of the University.
In public libraries the circulation

gan played good defensive hockey as
they held the Canadians until Cap-
tain David's return, and then James
and Heyliger went to work as Victor
passed to Gilbert for three goals in
the last five minutes of the period.
The third period saw the scoring
orgy reach its climax as the slim
Canadian whipped in three more
goals, two of which came on plays
from Heyliger's stick, and one on a
pass from Fritz Radford who made
his initial appearance last night.
St. Thomas, outskated throughout
most of the game came back in the
final period to avoid the most hu-
miliating kind of defeat and banged
four goals past Irwin Shalek.
Johnny Fabello countered for the
Wolverines early in the last period
when he took a pass from James, who
had rounded the St. Thomas net, and
rammed it past the bewildered Con-
nor.
Larry David got a goal on a well-
executed solo dash late in the game
when he outmaneuvered the St.
Thomas defense and blazed a drive
between Connor's arm and the post.
The eight-man Michigan squad
looked vastly improved last night,
and Lowrey believes that the Wol-
verines have an excellent chance of
stopping Minnesota this week-end.
Saves: 1 2 3 Total
Shalek ........2 3 3 8
Connor .......10 6 10 26
ALLEN RETURNS
Prof. Shirley Allen, of the forestry
school, has recently returned from
a two-day conference between semes-
ters at Washingtoi, where he con-
sulted with National Park officials on
a training program for the forestry
personnel of the National Park Serv-
ice.

generally exceeds the entire stock,'
but in university libraries it seldom
approaches the number of volumes.
"It is thus evident." Dr. Bishop writes,
"that this Library is used very in-
tensively by the student body and the
faculties."
In the circulation statistics, slight
decreases appear at but two points,
331 fewer books were drawn for over-
night use in the departmental and
collegiate libraries, and 233 by mem-
bers of the faculty.
In all other schedules a marked in-
crease was evident. This great in-
crease, the report says, is probably
a result of the increased enrollment
in the University as a whole, but the
amount of the growth in circulation
- 119,721 volumes - is the largest in-
crease ever recorded save that regis-
tered in 1920 when an increase of
129,164 was registered.
An increase in the use of books in
the stacks, the graduate reading
rooms, and the departmental libraries
"has been a matter of common re-
mark among the library staff," Dr.
Bishop says.
The efficiency of the service at the
delivery desk in the corridor of the
second floor of the General Library
was measured during the week of
April 22-27. In this week, 6,107 re-
quests for books were handed in at
the desk and 4,490 books or 73.52 per
cent were delivered to readers at once.
Reports of the location of 1,339 others
were given to the persons desiring the
books.

NEW YORK TIMES CORRESPONDENT

and PATHE

NEWS REPRESENTATIVE

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SINGLE ADMISSIONS: 75c and SOc TICKETS at WAHR'S
Next Week,: EDWARD PRICE BELL - "Interviewving the
Leaders of the World" - This lecture will be presented jointly
by the Oratorical Association and Sigma Delta Chi.

I

I

_

MATINEE
EVENING

PERFORMANCES "START PROMPTLY
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Phone Dial 6415 for Reserved Seats,

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11:00-WJR Bulletins.
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