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September 24, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-09-24

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PAGE SIX

TH E MII CHIGA N DAI LY,

SEPTEMBER 24, 1935

PAGE SIX SEPTEMBER24, 1935

Begin Rushing
Period At End
Of This Week
Freshmen Advised To Be
Careful Of Infractions
Of Council Rules
(Continued from Page 1)
accepted by ,a fraternity he designat-
ed as desirable on his preference list
will have received a notice instruct-
ing him to report to the fraternity
to which he will be pledged thatnight.
A more complex system of rush-
ing is used by the sororities. Funda-
mental in their plan is that no soror-
ity may have more than one tea, two
dinners, and one formal engagement
with the rushee. Also important is
their registration plan which is being
innovated this year. Blanks will be
given entering women during enroll-
ment proceedings in which they are
requested to express their wishes in
regard to rushing.
Invitations to initial teas given by
the sororities the first two days of
rushing will be mailed to the rushee
sometime after 9 a.m. Friday. The
teas will last from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m.
and each freshman woman is advised
to attend all to which she receives
an invitation, but she is requested
by Panhellenic Association, intersor-
ority council, that she remain at the
house no longer than three-quarters
of an hour.
Changes and additions to the men's
rushing rules were outlined by Wil-
liams. A list of these include a fine;
for freshmen who register after rush-
ing starts; a more explicit definition
of rushing; restrictions on any un-
dergraduate or alumnus equal to those
on a fraternity man; forbiddance of
any unethical statement or implica-
tion upon on fraternity by another; a
declaration of the ineligibility of a
rushee for a semester if he does not
pledge at the designated time; and1
the prohibition of an ineligible mani
to pay for his board in a fraternity.i
Rushing is now defined as "any1
conversation or contact of any sort
whatever with an eligible man except
by telephone or mail." This defini-t
tion becomes effective at noon today,
4,000 THRONG M.S.C.f
EAST LANSING, Mich., Sept. 23. -
(k') - Nearly 4,000 students, well in
excess of last year's record, thronged
the campus as Michigan State College
opened another school year today.
The registrar's office counted 3,900
students, compared with last year's
record of 3,323. Today marked the
opening of the new police training
school, a course designed to send out
highly trained criminologists. Grad-
uates will receive bachelor of science
degrees.

President Ruthven Talks At Rendezvous Camp

170 Freshmen
Attend Camp At
Patterson Lake
Annual Rendezvous Draws
Largest Gathering In 10
Years As Tradition
(Continued from Page 1)
tions on a questionnaire concerning
their religious beliefs. At the end
of the semester they will be given
the same questionnaire to determine
how their beliefs have been altered.
The executive staff of the Rendez-
vous consisted of Lawrence E. Quinn,
'36, director of the camp, and William
Wilsnack, '37, president of the S.C.A.
Advisors for the project were Ira M.
Smith, University registrar, Dr.
Blakeman and Anderson.
Members of the Rendezvous coun-
selor staff included Roderic Howell,
'35, William Howell, '32, Fred Ford,
'36, William Sawyer, '36, Max Col-
lins, '36, Justin Cline, '37, Gordon
Stowe, '36, Bert Kanwit, '37, Gilbert
Anderson, '36, Robert Johnson, '38,
John Jeffries, '37, Richard S. Clark,
'37, Francis Ready, '38, Jack Mer-
rill, '37, Edward Hoitman, '38, Wil-
liam Barndt, '37, William Wilsnack,
'38, Warren Underwood, '36E, and
Henry Wightman, '36E.
Welcome '39
State Street
Shoe Repair
Formerly at
301 S. STATE at LIBERTY
Now Located at
1117 S. UNIVERSITY

S.

C. A. Plays Important Role
Throughout Freshman's Year

I

17 ___14___________

II
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II
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The
Graystone

Members of the Class of 1939 will
probably be more familiar with the
activities of the Student Christian
Association than any other extra-
curricular organization on the cam-
pus. Sponsors and publishers of the
"Frosh Bible" which is distributed to
more than 2,000 people, the SCA
further strengthened its ties with the
incoming freshment by again di-
recting and counselling members of
the class for three days prior to.
Orientation Week at the Rendezvous
Camp.
The purpose of the Student Chris-
tian Association has been defined
as "to foster under student
N EFF'S News Stand
State at Arcade
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Local and Detroit Newspapers

initiative and leadership every effort
intended to assist students in recog-
nizing the true place of religion in
life; to help them in facing honestly
the real issues of the modern world;
and to counsel with them in develop-
ing a worthy sense of values."
(Continued on Page 7)
Watches.
THE TIME SHOP
1121 S. University Ave.

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9

DRUG SUNDRIES
CANDIES
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
SANDWICHES
STATIONERY
COMPLETE STU-
DENT SUPPLIES

IIl

Your Neighborhood Store
1217 Prospect Street
near Wells Street
(Extension of Church Street)

P

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4

_ -Michigan Daily Photo

Four Fraternities
Close Voluntarily
(Continued from Page 1)
end of the current school year every
house will be in sound financial
condition and none will be refused
permission to, open.
Dean of Students Joseh A. Bursley,
speaking of the University's attempt
to "help houses help themselves,"
said that he had received countless
compliments from both alumni and
actives of fraternities and sororities,
who believe that the University finan-
cial standards is "one of the best jobs
the University has ever done."
A number of methods were em-
ployed by the houses to insure their
opening, Professor Briggs stated.
Some paid off their back debts by
alumni contributions, others made a
cash deposit in Ann Arbor in order
to protect their creditors against tak-
ing losses during the current year.
One house, he reported, raised a
total of $800 from its alumni, while
another made a cash deposit in gov-
ernment bonds in order to, insure
themselves a little income resulting
from the interest.
Further proof that the University
financial standardts are a success is
shown, according to Professor Briggs,
by the greater leniency the Ann Arbor
merchants and the Credit Bureau
are showing in allowing houses to run
up accounts so far this semester.
I Watc he S.... I

Large Freshman Class
Enters Orientation Week
(Continued from Page 1)
students entering the University with
advanced credit will be offered by
the Union and the League on an
unofficial basis and which will be vol-
untary.
Giving these students the same
opportunity to become acquainted
with the University that is offered to
entering freshmen, the program will
consist of talks and trips and will
assist with registration and classifi-
caton.
Men students who wish to avail
themselves of this program are asked
to report between 2 and 4 p.m. today
or any time for the remainder of
the week in Room 304 of the Union.
The program will be under the direc-
tion of William S. Struve, '37.
Women students are asked to re-
port at 8 a.m. today or any time fol-
lowing to the Council Room of the
League, where the program will be
under the direction of Maryanna
Chockley, 37.

_.

..

GOOD MORNING
STUDENTS .....
HEADQUARTERS
for PICTURE FRAMES
and
Good Photography
619 East Liberty Street

A

A-Ift -"VwOW%-OA A MPONOl ilk A 1% 1 4
-- -- -- -*%4 Wiftwobwo~

The MICHIGAN
WOLVERINE
Welcomes the Men
of '39
"M" MEN find QUALITY plus ECONOMY

K_

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OMAmOW

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when eating here.
A Non-Profit Student-Operated Cafeteria
H
OF, BY, and FOR MICHIGAN MEN
Come Down and Talk It Over

T E

I-

LANE HALL

202 SOUTH

STA

i0-

.

1

IL 11 A q Al 1 Poo, 10 A -

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II

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III

We Specialize in
WOMEN'S SHOES and
FULL SOLES
We Dye and Tint Any Color

I

THE TIME SHOP
1121 S. University Ave.

Ig

Hosiery - Lingerie - Pajamas
Gowns- Sweaters- Uniforms

II"f

RIGHT QUALITY
AND RIGHT PRICES
make the
NEW GRANADA CAFE
American Owned and Operated
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST RESTAURANT
313 SOUTH STATE STREET
Near North University
"Home Cooking in a Modernized Way"

t r,;, t ' rP'1'

' " - --
- -,
--
,-"
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For Better Health..

Milk--Cream--Ice Cream

Visit our little shop between Campus
and Hospital where prices are low and
values are high ...

Special Fraternity Service

OUR LOCATION SAVES YOU MONEY !
GLEN ANN SHOPPE

Ann Arbor Dairy
Phone 4101

1031 East Ann Street

OPEN EVENINGS

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III

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tzgan

40P
AL. Ak

SUBSCRIPTION

RATES

I

One Year

Cash

4.00
FtI..6

One-Half Year
$2.25

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