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September 24, 1935 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SEPTEMBER 24, 1935
Long's Murder
Is No Political
Upset - - Brown
Political Scienctist Thinks
Conservative Democrats
Third Party Threat
Predictions in national circle
that the death of Huey Long woulc
have a profound effect upon the
presidential campaign of 1936 were
held to be greatly exaggerated by
Prof. Everett S. Brown of the political
science department, in a discussion
of the coming election.
Professor Brown, nationally noted
for his analyses of domestic political
events, is the author of the articles
on national politics in the American
Year Book for the past several years
and has been asked to contribute tc
the Year Book for 1935.
Inclined to minimize a statement
in a national magazine that " ... .
the United States realized that save
for Franklin Roosevelt, no other pub-
lic figure (than Huey Long) could by
his death produce so great a change
in U. S. Politics," Professor Brown
believes that the disturbance follow-
ing upon his death will be confined
largely to local circles.
Long No Threat
"The third party threat comes not
so much from the Long-Coughlin
'Share-the-Wealth' faction as it does
from the group of conservative Dem-
crats fearful of the New Deal phil-
osophy," he said. "Long did assist
Roosevelt in gaining the Democratic
nomination in 1932, and his hostility
might have cost Roosevelt some
Southern votes, but the election will
not be materially altered by Long's
death."
The grip of President Roosevelt on
the voters of the West has weakened
considerably in the past year, Profes-
sor Brown concludes from his obser-
vations during a.Western trip. "Un-
certainty, disapproval of the taxa-
tion resulting from the huge govern-
ment expenditures, and fear of the
New Deal tendencies all have lost the
administratioh a great deal of sup-
port, although it is too early to pre-
dict whether it will eventually cost
the election.
Talks With Hoover
During his trip throughout the
West, Professor Brown stopped in
Palo Alto for a discussion of the
approaching election with Former
President Herbert Hoover. In reply
to a question concerning Mr. Hoov-
er's possible candidacy,- Professor
Brown stated: "It appears to be the
Republican plan to join all forces
in a consolidated attack on the New
Deal, rather than to split their ranks
by naming a candidate this early.
"This is wise in view of the fact
that the Republicans have no one
outstanding leader. It is unfortu-
nate, some Republican leaders be-
lieve, that the attack on the New
Deal is begun so early," he said, "be-
cause it may have lost its thrust by
the time of the election, and it al-
lows Roosevelt ample time to count-
er the attack.
Roosevelt's Strategy
"It would appear, from his corres-
pondence with publisher Roy How-
ard and from other indications, that
the chief item in Roosevelt's tactics
will be to seek to reasure the busi-
ness men and restore confidence. It
was an astute move on his part to
have the tax measure passed this
year instead of next, thus removing
it from the field of bitter partisan
issues," Professor Brown believes.
"Whether he intends to carry out
the 'breathing spell' policy in action
as well as in words, is an object of

Republican speculation."
7,800 SEE NIAGARA
JACKSON, Sept.N23. -(I) - Mich-
igan Central officials disclosed Mon-
day that a cut-rate excursion on Sun-
day sent 7,800 Michigan people in 10
special trains to see Niagara Falls. Of
that number, 670 were from Jackson.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4 Ov ...SEVEN

,.. :s t i # J1.M. +t ' !R!T~PAE .. SEVENl
".

Deans Of Two University Schools
It-.. ,:..::.

S. C. A. Plays Important Role
Throughout Freshman's Year

I

Deans of two of the University's schools and colleges are Samuel T.
Dana (right) of the School of Forestry and Conservation and Herbert C.
Sadler of the College of Engineering.
Deans' Welcomes T o New Students

(Continued from Page 6)
Membership in the S.C.A. is ex-
tended gratis to both men and wom-
en students of the University. Or-
ganization activities center in Lane
Hall, which has 19 offices, auditorium,
reading rooms, cooperative cafeteria,
and meeting rooms. Newberry Hall
is also owned by the Student Chris-
tian Association.
Last year a five-week round table
series was conducted under the aus-
pices of their organization. It has
sponsored the appearance of such
noted speakers as Dr. Bernard Id-
dings Bell, Dr. Frank D. Lutz, Dr.
Charles M. Sheldon, Prof. Jean Pic-
card and Dr. Frances S. Onderdonk.
Participation of the S.C.A. in ac-
tivities with other organization was
aided by sending delegates to the
three-day state conference at Camp
Ohiyyesa, the Tri-State conference
at Fort Wayne, Ind., monthly meet-
ings of the state Y.M.C.A. and the
Y.M.C.A. central field council con-
ference in Chicago.
Outstanding among the philan-
thropic activities of the organization
was the presentation of an "All-Cam-
pus Jamboree' program in Hill Audi-
torium April 27 for the benefit of the
Fresh Air Camp.
. Officers for the 1935-36 school year
include William Wilsnack, '37, presi-
bbl ~ ~ err" ""
THE TIME SHOP
1121 S. University Ave.

dent; Evelyn Maloy, '36, vice-presi-
dent; Richard S. Clark, '37, secretary.
The following men appear on the
board of trustees: Ira M. Smith,
chairman; Frank Royce, treasurer;
Prof. George E. Carrothers, Eugene
Clarkson. Prof. Ferdinand N. Mene-
fee, President Ruthven, Wilsnack,
and Miss Maloy. The student cabinet
has not been appointed yet.
---

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To all students who are enter-
* ing the University of Michigan for
the first time I wish to express a
cordial welcome, and to offer as-
sistance in any problems with
which you may be faced during
your first year on the campus.
The office of the Dean of Stu-
dents, whose function is to supply
a definite link between the student
body and the University stands
ready, through its various depart-
ments, to give sympathetic atten-
tion and advice.
It is our hope that your ad-
justments may be quickly made
and that your years here will be a
happy and successful part of your
educational life.
JOSEPH A. BURSLEY,
Dean of Students.
Success Based
On Mystic 'G,'
Scientist Finds
Psychologist Says 'General
Factor' Is Indefinible
Personality Element
(Continued from Page 1)
professional men, retail merchants,
and unemployed. On one sample
question submitted to small groups of
each category, the corporation presi-
dents voted 100 per cent "no," while
the trade union men voted 100 per
cent in favor.
Questions used by the Psychologi-
cal Corporation and suggested by
them for future surveys include such
as the following:
Do you think that the United
States should cancel foreign debts?
Has the idea "Buy American" led
you to refuse to buy any article not
made in America.
What do you think of Father
Coughlin?
Do you think that prosperity will
increase much before the next presi-
dential elections?
COUZENS A WELL MAN
ROCHESTER, Minn., Sept. 23. -
(?) - Senator Couzens of Michigan

I am glad to say a word of greet-
ing to the new students and to
wish that for them the experience
at the University of Michigan will
be rich in friendship as well as
a vital and interesting adventure
in learning.
ALICE C. LLOYD,
Dean of Women.
was described as "practically a well
man" by physicians at the Mayo
Clinic today. They said he would
probably leave for home within a few
days.

LL

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