100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 1939

-THlE MICiIGAN 1DUALY

wmswwmm

Movement To
Left Expected
By Winnacker
Premier Sarraut's Ministry
To Take Middle-Ground
( ourse, He Says
(Continued from Page 1)

Toscanini Denies Rumor Of Resignation

toward Great Britain and less con-
ciliatory toward Italy than his pred-
ece sor in the present conflict in
AfriMO.
oi wtlechange in thehdeflationist
course which France has pursued
since the beginning of the depression
can be expected from the new govern-
ment, Dr. Winnacker asserted.
He explained that abandonment
of the deflation policy, which has
lowered wages and prices--but not
living costs - throughout the coun-
try, would be a serious blow to a nu-
merous class of "rentiers," or holders
of securities.
However Dr. Winnacker decried the
effects of the deflation program, car-
ried out by Laval, because it has
worked hardships on the peasants
and government employees.
He said that the political set-up is
complicated by the inability of either
leftist or rightist factions to co-oper-
ate in the Chamber of Deputies.
At present, Dr. Winnacker approxi-
mated, there are 18 members of the
Chamber with Communist leanings,
123 Socialists, and 154 Radical Social-
ists (whom he described as being
neither radical nor socialist but mild-
ly liberal.)
in addition, he estimated 37 mem-
bers as belonging to the "center left,"
101 to the "center," 54 to the "center
right," and 76 to the "right" factions.
He pointed out that although the
forges of the left have the majority
in the Chamber, they must move
warily because of the ineffectiveness
of their co-operation.
Prof. Jeserich
Seeks Painless
Tooth Fillings
Faculty Member Assisting
Columbia Professor In
Testing Method
(Continued from Page 1)
exclamation of the patient, might re-
splt,
"When sufficient experimental
worl with the new desensitizer has
been completed at the dental school,"
Dr. Jeserich said, "a statement as
to its effect will be forthcoming." He
said he hoped to obtain results
"soon."
Painting a picture of the internal
tooth structure, Dr. Jeserich de-
scribed the way that Dr. Hartman's
"pain-killer" kills pain.
The tooth structure consists of
enamel, dentine and cementum sur-
ropnding an internal pulp chamber.
The dentine, on which the desensitiz-
er acts, is a dense, yellowish-white
material of which nearly three-quar-
ters is inorganic material, chiefly
lime salts, and one-quarter organic,
or animal matter.
The organic material is largely in
the form of minute, wavy fibrils,
about one-half a microns in diamet-
er, each encased within a tiny tube
running from under the surface of
the enamel to the pulp or nerve.
How these fibrils, which may be com-
pared to an insulated copper wire
transmitting an electric current,
really operate, is not thoroughly un-
derstood. It is known, however, that
they convey sensation to the nerve
in the form of pain - a danger sig-
nal that decay has begun in the
tooth. Dr. Hartman's problem was
to silence these automatic alarms
while work was being performed on
the tooth.
The Columbia scientist's first ma-
jor achievement was the determina-
tion that the fibrils were composed
of lipoids or non-protein fatty ma-
terial. Continued research indicated
that thymol, a chemical compound
made from the oil of thyme and oth-
er plants of the mint family, would
serve the function of a desensitizer.
Low concentrations of thymol are

commonly used in the treatment of
external ulcers and oral infections
and, occassionally, as an internal
antiseptic.
Lipoids, however, cannot be dis-
solved by thymol. So Dr. Hartman
then discovered that sulphuric ether
would act as a solvent, placing the
fibrils in a condition upon which the
thymol could act. Eventually, a
formula was elaborated consisting of
two parts of sulphuric ether,one
part of thymol and one part of
ethyl alcohol, the last serving as a
catalytic agent, i.e. speeding up the
action of the other two chemicals
and holding them in balance. The
pain-deadening effect is said to be
almost instantaneous and to last
from 20 minutes to several hours.
Today - Mon - Tues.{

Local Art Club
To Show Work
Feb. 14 To 19
The thirteenth annual Ann Arbor
Artists' exhibition, sponsored by the
Ann Arbor art association, has been
I announced for next month by Doug-
las L. Loree, president of the asso-
ciation.
The exhibit will be hung in the
galleries of Alumni Memorial' Hall.
from Feb. 14 to 19, and will represent
work submitted by professional and
amateur artists who are members of
the association, and who are present
or past residents of Washtenaw
County. Entries must be original
work in the plastic or graphic arts
with photographs or commercial work
excluded.
Prof. Bruce M. Donaldson may be
called for information concerning
rules and qualifications, and entry
blanks may be obtained at his office
in Alumni Memorial Hall on Feb. 7
and 8.
There will be two juries, one for pic-
tures and one for sculpture, the mem-
bers of which will be announced next
week.
Dental Students

CLASSIFIED ADVE RTISING

CLASSIFIED
A )VERrtISING
Place advertisements with Classified
kdvertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at on
extra charge.
Cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of fivetaverage words1to
line) for one or two insertions. 16c
per reading line for three or more
inisertions. Minimum 3 lines per In-
sertion.
I'tlephone rate -Ilec per reading line
for two or more insertions. Minimum
three lines per insertion.
Sdiscount if paid within ten days
fromi the date of last insertion.
fly cot racs, per in e-2 lines daily,
one -m-ront-.... ..........8c
4 lives .0.D., 2 months ........8c
2 liiies daily. college year.......7c
4 lines 10.,.2 months......8c
100 tines used as desired .. .. 9c
300 lines used as desired ...Sc
1.000) linie, used as desired. ......7c
2.000 line., used as desired.....6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
onic type, upper and lower case. Add
Gc per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add
10c per line to albove rates for bold face
uupital let ter's.
The above rates are for 7%i point
Type'
FOR RENT--ROOMS
FOR RENT: Front suite for two men

NOTICES
DRESSMAKING: Formals for J-Hop
time. 1208 S. University. Phone;
2-2020. 12x
STATIONERY: Printed with your
nauie and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00. Many styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
EYES examined, best glasses made at
lowest prices. Oculist, U. of M. grad-
uate, 44 years practice. 549 Pack-
ard. Phone 2-1866. 13x1
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
SELL YOUR OLD CLOTHES: We'll
buy old and new suits and over-
coats for $3 to $20. Also highest
prices for saxophones and typewrit -
erg. Don't sell before you see Sam.
Phone for appointments. 2-3640.
10x 1
WANTED
WANTED: 300 copies Scheville-His-
tory of Europe. Highest CASH
prices paid at The College Book-
shop. State St. at North University.'
240_
FIRE PREVENTED
Firemen wvere called to the home of
Horace H. Warren, 741 Spring St.,
late yesterday afternoon when sparks
from the chimney set the roof on
fire. The blaze was soon extinguished,
and little damage was done.

LOST AND FOUND

LOST: Staltivoltz's Anatomy Book.
Belongs to Library. Phone 4426.
Reward. 243
LOST: Conklin green and black foun-
tain pen. Vacuum fill type. Re-
turn 1223 Hill or phone 6537. 231
FOR SALE
------
MEDICAL students for eugenic books.
Give name, address, age and phone
number to Box 110 or phone 3059.
235
FOR SALE: Tuxedo, size 38 in excel-
lent condition. A real buy at $10.
Phone 2-3445. 233

r

{
I
I
a
1
1
i
i

--Associated Press Photo.
Arturo Toscanini is furious at rumors he planned to resign director-
ship of the New York Philharmonic-Symphony society, but apparently
he is not willing to say definitely that he will stay. The camera study
shows the expressiveness of the great conductor's hands.
Director Toscanini Explodes
At Rumor Of His Resignation

students. Light ana warm. 420 S.
Division. Phone 3968. 239
O n e n s1 1 TWO SUITES, one block from cam-
U W e ea iS pus. Phone 2-3738. 238
FOR RENT: Front suite, for women,
The School of Dentistry will hold across from campus, 703 Haven
s annual homecoming for alumni Avenue. Phone 7225. 237
nd friends of the school on Wed-__
FOR RENT: Desirable suite for two
esday, Jan. 29, according to an an- men or single in best surroundings.
ouncement made yesterday by Prof. 904 Oakland. 236

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
LAUNDRY, carefully washed in soft
water and hand ironed. Reason-
able. Telephone 7287. 11x
LOWEST PRICES
PROGRAMS, BIDS, STATIONERY
THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown, North of Postoffice

its
an
ne
no

Philharmonic-Symphony's
Leader Is Quiet On His
Future Plans
Broadcasted over anation-wide
hookup yesterday afternoon, the
Metropolitan Opera Company, di-
rected by Arturo Toscanini, present-
ed, in the honor of this famous con-
ductor, Verdi's opera "Aida."
"Aida" was the first opera which
Toscanini directed, more than 50
years ago in Rio de Janeiro, and
through his phenomenal success in
directing this opera he achieved al-
most immediate recognition and
popularity among music lovers
throughout the world.
By JOHN SELBY
NEW YORK, Jan. 25.-(P)-Eyes
flashing fury, Arturo Toscanini lit-
erally ran off the pier the other day
after landing from the "Lafayette."
Toscanini was furious because of
rumors that he plans to resign the
musical directorship of the New York
Philharmonic-Symphony society at
the close of this, his tenth season.
Nevertheless, the rumor persists,
and according to a Philharmonic
spokesman, Toscanini still has not
said definitely that he will stay. After
a decade as the chief prop of one of
the great orchestras of the world, his
departure might precipitate a first
rate musical crisis.
One Long Fight
Crises are nothing new to Tos-
canini. Certainly more adored than
any conductor since Nikisch, his life
has been one long fight with his
idolators for time in which to do his
work. He has turned his back on
countesses, flung batons at offending
orchestra men, hidden himself from
the public, consistently refused in-
terviews. Yet those thousands tol
whom Toscanini is a god will not let
him alone.
"Those women," Toscanini ex-
claimed in a tired, disgusted voice
last summer when finally he was
safe on a train leaving Salzburg. Or
at least that is the report of a prom-
inent musician who rode with him.
Since June 25, 1886, when Tosca-
nini was called out of bed to con-
duct "Aida" in Rio de Janiero, Tos-
canini has been both man and legend.
Even his debut as conductor was
dramatic, the result of one of those
operatic uproars which abound in
Latin conductors. One day he was
a talented young cellist from Parma,
nicknamed "Genio" and mad about
opera. Next day he was a conductor.
Complicated Legend
His history is simple and clear on
the surface. Born on the other side
of the tracks at Parma March 25,
1867, after 1886 his carrer was one
major achievement after another;

popularization of several composers:
dramatic retirement after six years
as chief conductor of the Metropoli-
tan; resuscitation of La Scala after
the war; triumphal tour of the New
York Philharmonic abroadain 1930;
preeminence at Salzburg and Bay-
reuth; tempestuous scenes with Mus-
solini.
The legend is more complicated.
Most of them arise because he is a
fanatical perfectionist with an or-
chestra. The legend of his fabulous
musical memory is founded on fact,
of course. Yet many conductors dis-
pense with the score at performance.
This legend has given rise to a belief
that Toscanini is all but blind. He
is very near-sighted, and to read
score must bury his face in the book.
'Assassin!'
The legend of the Toscanini tem-
perament is fabulous, and also has
some basis in fact. It is said by one
close to Maestro that not long hence
a certain young conductor was
"guesting" with the Philharmonic,
and Toscanini listened from a box.
Toscanini was displeased. He fidget-
ed, frowned, finally burst out au-
dibly: "Assassin!"
Two friends intervened before the
incident became a cause celebre, per-
suaded Toscanini to leave.
"I like it better with the third
finger!"
New Architectural
rourses Planned
A general course in the History of
Architecture, and a course in Domes-
tic Architecture and Housing will be
offered in the College of Architecture
during the second semester.
The former, Architecture 15, is de-
signed, according to Prof. Emil Lorch,
to give non-technical students a sur-
vey of the art of building. It is open
to all students, and will be given
by Prof. Ralph W. Hammet at 9 a.m.
on Tuesday and Thursday.
The course on Domestic Housing
and Architecture is intended for stu-
dents of economics, sociology and
city-planning, as well as students of
architecture. The course will survey
the trend in modern housing, and will
study prefabrication and the increas-
ing use of synthetic materials. It
will be taught by Prof. Waldo L Ben-
net.

Russell W. Bunting of the dental
school.
Invitations to this homecoming
have been sent to all dental alumni,1
and certain groups and dental or-
ganizations in Michigan have been
invited to attend.
The day will be occupied by lec-
tures and clinical demonstrations
given by members of the faculty and
alumni, Professor Bunting stated.
The program will begin at 10 a.m.
and will continue until 5:30 p.m. At
noon a luncheon will be held in the
Union ballroom with Vice-President
James D. Bruce making the principal
address.a
It is expected, according to Profes-
sor Bruce, that alargednumber of
dentists will be in attendance.

FOR GIRL: Next semester, pleasant,
well-furnished single room, one
block from campus. 523 Thompson.
247
THIRD floor triplicate, running water
$2.50 each. Second floor exquisite
suite $5.00 each. 928 Church.
241
TO RENT in private home to faculty
member or graduate student, a
beautifully furnished suite. Living
room, bedroom and lavatory. Phone
9524. 228
FOR RENT: Suite with twin beds for
two men students. Also double
room. 933 Forest. Phone 8347.
227

Employed men and women accommodated promptly and privately.
Special plans for both single and married people. Repayment in easy in-
stalments may be extended from Ito 20 months. Come in - write- or 'phone.
PERSONAL FINANCE COMPANY
2nd Floor Wolverine Bldg. Room 208
208 EAST WASHINGTON STREET
Phone 4000-4001 Cor. 4th Avenue Ann Arbor

4

C
Al

DAILY 15c to 6 P.M.
NOW
Two Features!
-ONTINUOUS 1:30 to 11
FIRST ANN ARBOR SHOWING
LLISON SKIPWORTH RALPH MORGAN
MAE CLARKE II MAXINE DOYLE

"HITCH HIKE
LADY"

11

"CONDEMNED
TO LIVE"

( i

Aa'

I !

LOWELL THOMAS I DR. OSWALD _|!LATEST NEWS

119

I

TODAY!
Continuous
Shows Ito 11

L

r~w~ lwn~lrL

25c till 2 P.M.
Thereafter
All Seats - 35c

A 14 OT H F
CRACK -AN D
Y L L WA LK
OUT ON xOU!

The Michigan has a Grand
Show Right Now!

O-K. I'LL
410LE THE

SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, tap, acrobaties.
Taught daily. Terrace
Carden Studio. Wuerth
"rheatre Bldg. Ph. 9696
Open evenings.

11 -- 1

the hut
features for sun day
breaded veal tenderloin steak . . . 50c
grilled small sirloin steak . . . . .. 55c
roast prime ribs of steer beef .... 60c
broiled sizzling veal steak . . . . . . 55c
nl l n r latrs rsnnascI

. E ? : . f : : : .
;:

Associ'te Proucer Kenneth Macgown
Directed by Sidney Lanfield
From a story by Vina Delmot
--_ -A

- - =TA R S'# 4
.. ATA RS'sf

III

ALSO

III

III~ _ _ _..I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan