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October 02, 1935 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
S-
t j -
th

11

I i

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
0ssochated 9 ltsiate r ss
- i1A34 ][ VA19 3.5 -
~msoN WscCOtS
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y.-400 N. Michigan Ave.
Chicago, Ill,
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ..............THOMAS H. KLEENE
ASSOCIATE EDITOR...............THOMAS E. GROEHN
ASSOCIATEIEDITOR................JOHN J. FLAHERTY
RnOR"-q FTOR................ .WILLIAM H. REED
WOMEN'S EDITOR...............JOSEPHINE T. McLEAN
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EDITORS ..
. DOROTHY S. GIES, JOHN C. HEALEY
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Ne:' a ... .................Elsie A. Pierce
Ro bert Cummins and Marshall D. Shul-
NignL ]t " ':bert B. Brown, Clinton B. Conger, Rich-
ar c hey. Ralph W. Hurd, Fred Warner Neal, and
Be m. s Weissman.
SPORT1-' ABSST~ANTS: George Andros, Fred Buesser, Fred
DoLiaan'<; Friedman. Raymond Goodman.
WOM7IN S A_2JS._ - i Dr:)O i, A.4:Briscoe. Florence 1H
Da i T.e ou I. 2uiden.- Lois M.
K mgj; ,;l,,z r , ,el . Wuer el-
Rl{POPTERA. ". Bryce Alpern, Leonard Bleyer, Jr., Wil-
a, ' noLester Brauser, Albert Carlisle,LRich-
a';id(u A:\nold S. Daniels, William John DeLancey,
:r~~ort chc~use, John J. Frederick, Carl Gerstacker,
Vv -r C" ddors, Robert Goldstine, John Hinckley,
S. Le: nard Kasle, Richard LaMarca, Herbert W. Little,
7, 7. I Vby. Joseph S. Mattes, Ernest L. McKenzie,
Arthur A.Miller, Stewart Orton, George S. Quick,
2ber D. Reo.ers William Scholz, William E. Shackle-
ton, Richard Sidder, I. S. Silverman, William C. Spaller,
Tuure Trmnander, and Robert Weeks.
12r.1.t ~ ~ ~ r.Mary Campbell, Helen Douglas.
i a r Mary-E. Garvin, Betty J. Groomes,
Jhnn oh wn ~oupite Kanners, Virginia Kenner,
M:) l-,c ) rie Mackintosh, Louise Mars,
~oim.~ u~Mc~i. Thrbara Spencer, Betty Strick-
root Tere, s:'b Peggy Swantz, and Elizabeth Whit-
noy,
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ..........GEORGE H. ATHERTON
CREDIT MANAGER...........JOSEPH A. ROTHBARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGERS ...............-
.....MARGARET COWIE, ELIZABETH SIMONDS
DEPARTMENTAL MANAGERS: Local advertising, William
Barndt; Service Department, Willis Tomlinson; Con-
tracts, Stanley Joffe; Accounts, Edward Wohlgemuth;
Circulation and National Advertising, John Park;
Classified Advertising and Publications, Lyman Bitt-
man.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: Jerome I. Balas, Charles W.
Barkdull, D. G. Bronson, Lewis E. Bulkeley, John C.
Clark. Robert J. Cooper, Richard L. Croushore, Herbert
D. Fallender, John T. Guernsey, Jack R. Gustafson,
Mortrnn J c~bs. Ernest A. Jones, Marvin Kay, Henry
J. Klose, William C. Knecht, R. A. Kronenberger, Wil-
liam R. Mann, John F. McLean, Jr., Lawrence M. Roth,
Richard M. Samuels, John D. Staple, Lawrence A. Star-
sky, Norman B. Steinberg.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF: Betty Cavender, Bernadine
Field, Betty Greve, Helen Shapland, Grace Snyder,
Betsy Baxter, Margaret Bentley, Mary McCord, Adele
Polier.
NIGHT EDITOR: MARSHALL D. SHULMAN

daily paper to tear his hair, irequently they are
guilty of editorializing in their news columns.
But they perform the real functions of a
newspaper: they inform and they advise. It is
fundamental psychology that people like to read
about themselves. The country paper "local"
- "Mrs. Smith's little niece, Sadie, is visiting her"
-is one of the chief things that endears it to the
hearts of its readers. Those intimate, seemingly
unimportant news items, petty as they may be,
are what people like to read about.
It is quite probable that country newspapers
wield as large or large influence in our political
sentiment as any other medium. Written in a
personal, chatty fashion, the reader feels that 1,/
is conversing with the editor, whom he knows in-
timately. The country editor is as important a
personage in community life as the country doc-
tor, and often more so. To the editor the vil-
lagers bring their troubles. They follow his advice
because he is their friend and they respect him.
One of the most important factors in the ap-
parent trend of antagonism to the New Deal is the
opposition of small town newspapers. And this isf
but an example of many movements which started
or which were successful because the home-town
poper backed them.
But all country papers are not the hodge-podge
of small headlines, front page advertisements and
personals that they are painted. Many of them
have excellent make-up, produce excellent writing
and give a thorough coverage in every detail of
their community.
The country newspaper will not die. The daily
papers cannot cover all fields. More and more is
the metropolitan press devoting itself to state,
national and international news. The smaller,
more trivial news, which nevertheless has an im-
p ortant and more intimate effect on the small
town resident, remains for the weekly paper.
The weekly press has been quick to take up the
trend of interpretation and explanation of news
events. While the great dailies have to confine
themselves to statement of fact, the country editor,
thinking it over from Friday until Wednesday, can
explain to his friend, the storekeeper, what this
Ethiopian business is all about.
And more and more are country editors becom-
ing qualified to fill their important positions. The
old-school publisher, who never had and never
wants any education in passing. College grad-
sates are finding that there is a field for them
in the weekly papers.
And one more reason why the country news-
oapers will not die: they make money.

A Washington
BYSTANDER

By KIRKE SIMPSON

WASHINGTON, Oct.
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S surprise epistle

1.
to

the clergy on the social security act comes
under scrutiny as to its possible "politics" angle.
Nothing the White House does between now andc
election day will escape that sort of appraisal. It I
is part of the game. Yet there might be a quite
different explanation.
The trouble is that the White House itself sur-
rounded the incident with mystery. It did not an-P
nounce that such letters from the President had1
gone out to a list of clergymen. That leaked outr
from some recipient. The number of letters sentz
out remained unknown. No explanation for the1
move was .forthcoming beyond that contained in1
the text of the President's communication itself.1
* * * *
Presidential Motives1
TO SOME of the reverend gentlemen the letterl
came as a presidential questionnaire as to
what they thought about the New Deal in gen-
eral. The symposium of comment by recipientst
gathered by The Associated Press discloses that.
Yet it appears that the only specific New Deal
measure dwelt upon in the letter was the social;
security act.
Success of the national old age and unemploy-
ment insurance plan must rest finally upon local1
cooperation, upon the states. Changes center in
state constitutions will be required to provide for
uniform national operation of the system. Early
changes in existing state old-age -or other pension
systems will be necessary elsewhere.
These facts suggest, at least, that aside from
any political-trend survey values the replies from
the clergymen might have, the unprecedented
action of the President might have been aimed at
another target. In directly addressing them indi-
vidually and invoking their aid in furtherance
of the New Deal social security measure he might
have hoped to expedite state cooperative action.
If that was the purpose, the clergy in intimate
touch with the public all over the country might
provide a valuable stimulus to popular demand
for quick and complete state cooperation.
* * * *
Rallying Sentimcut
THE PRESS SYMPOSIUM indicates that almost
without exception the clergy are for the se-
curity act's purposes. Some of them had critical
views to express on other New Deal moves, but
as was to be expected none placed himself in
opposition to the social security act. Mr. Roose-
velt no doubt counted on that in deciding to send
out his letter.
What effect the communication might have
of rallying public sentiment behind the act na-
turally would depend upon the extent to which
the White House went in making up its mailing
list.
If the distribution of the letter has been as wide
as the circumstances suggest, Mr. Roosevelt ought
to be able to discern a geographical picture of
public sentiment as to social reform elements of
the New Deal. From that angle, the interchange
could have campaign planning values the Presi-
dent's political aides probably will not overlook.
The National League offers a maximum of con-
troversy, but Detroit has things under control in
the American League and Italy is well out in front
in the League of Nations. - Daily Iowan.
The first thing Congress will do after the de-
pression disappears is to stake a $100,000 investi-
gation to find out where it went. - McPherson Re-
publican.

WELCOME HOME
IT'S STUPENDOUS! IT'S COLOS-
SAL! IT'S MAGNIFICENT! IT'S
MARVELOUS! IT'S AWE-INSPIR-
ING! IT'S SUPERLATIVE, MORE
SUPERLATIVE, MOST SUPERLA-
TIVEST!
WELL, WHAT IS IT?
IT'S TOASTED ROLLS, THE AN-
CESTOR OF IFFY, BRISBANE,
MA R K T W A I N, STOOPNAGLE,
BENNY, BAKER, AND BUDD. (You'd
never know they were all related,
would you?) IT'S THE OLD TOAST-
ED ROLL COLUMN OF THE MICH-
IGAN DAILY OF 1925 OR 1932.
ANYWAY, IT'S BACK, AND TOAST-
ED ROLLS, IN BEHALF OF TOAST-
ED ROLLS, WISHES TO BE THE
FIRST TO WELCOME TOASTED
ROLLS BACK TO THE DAILY.
how can we dodge Saturday classes?
Toasted Rolls, the flavor in your
coffee, the meal in your oatmeal, will
again be with you at breakfast-time
. that light bit of reading to cut
away the fog before your eight-
o'clock. And the toaster, Jabber
Wock, is glad to be the successor to
such eminent toasters as Elmer Gan-
try, Dan Baxter, Smiley, Timothy
Hay, Joe Tinker, and the illustrious
Whoofle family - Qudqgp, Mfwyp,
Tommykins, Elmer, Pltsch, and Zcy-
znki Whoofle, and their little stooge,
little Yvonne Fagan.
And, since Rolls has been away
from The Daily for all of three years
now, we might as well print the Rolls'
Directory: the list of Depts. for which
Rolls is duly famous:
how can we dodge Saturday classese
LOOKIE LOOKIE DEPT.
Rolls prints here its exclusive map
of the trouble zone in the Mediter-
ranean. All the other papers have,'
so why shouldn't we? We drew a line
from Ahddiss Aahwawah to Rome.
Then we drew one from Eritrea to
Adua. And just for fun, we drew one
from Scranton to Hoboken, for Feld-
man's benefit. The map shows where
they cross. Several important island
possessions of Italy are just beyond
the right hand border of the map,
and the British Home fleet is due
to cross the left edge of the map
in three days. All there is in the
map right now though is the Mediter-
ranean.

TOASTED
ROLLS

THE FORUMj
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editors reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the canrpus.
Transfer Woest
To the Editor:
I am a Junior transfer student from a small
Michigan college and would like to make a few
observations about the University.
In the first place no attempt is made at orien-
tation for students entering with advanced credit.
Just why we are supposed to know more about the
University's complicated way of doing things than
any other new student is a mystery. I am certain
that nearly every transfer student is as "green"
as the "greenest" Freshman.
My other big "gripe" is the essential unfriendli-
ness of the University. When an old student sees
a new one in trouble he does nothing to help
- more likely he laughs about it.
What Michigan needs most is a more friendly
attitude on the part of both the students and the
administration. -Transfer.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to the President
until 3:30; 11:00 a.m. on Saturday.

Exit The
Sunday Law...
S TATE ATTORNEY-GENERAL TOY
and his assistants have ruled that
prohibition upon the sale of beer on Sunday would
be illegal. The threat of a "blue law" of this na-
ture fortunately appears to have vanished with this
decision.
The proposed ban had little of a constructive
nature in it. The sale of beer on Sunday has
proved to be no untoward stimulus to intoxication
and disorder. The communities of the State have
encountered no physical disturbance as a result of
the sale. The purpose of the proposed restrictions
was not to remedy any palpably undesirable con-
ditions.
Rather it was the effort of what must be re-
garded as narrow-minded groups bent upon forcing
their moral standards upon everyone in the com-
munity. As such it could not gain the support
of thinking and progressive citizens. As such it
could never have had any fundamental success
for it was not a matter of collective good, but rather
of individual ethics.
Any group which seeks to arbitrarily set up and
enforce a code of personal ethics for the people
as a whole is acting in an arrogant and oppressive
manner. No matter how high and sincere the
ideals of such a group may be, these ideals will
suffer in the minds of others if dictatorial enforce-
men' of them is attempted or demanded.
? sucwh id eals have a fundamental ethical value,
th g . eted in the persons of those who be-
i:ve ard ll.vow them, will be a much more power-
f;. nc, a:rrable reason for their adoption by
ot e; tian my State statute can possibly be.
Smal" i jWll
1
Sournalhsm .. .
T HE' TERM, "small townish" is fre-
quently applied to newspapers, the
implication being that they are not upholding
the standards of good journalism.
Such criticism - if it is criticism - is misdirect-
ed. The small town newspapers of the United
0,ta+a arpan+ln-.Iv onort from their lamr anda

Grade'A' Still Means Something

By B. C. FORBES
(Reprinted by special permission of B. C. Forbes)
FROM MILLIONS of homes are faring forth
young men and young women, boys and girls
-colleges and schools are resuming.
The demand for their services and the record
they achieve in after life will be governed to quite
an extent by the showing they make in their
studies.
Notwithstanding all the unemployment preva-
lent during the depression years, top-notch uni-
versity graduates have been eagerly wanted by im-'
portant corporations and institutions. Leading
students at business colleges have been in par-
ticularly keen demand.
Fears have been expressed by many parents
that recent political trends would inculcate into
young minds the idea that, even though they did
not exert themselves, their livelihood would be
provided for them by a paternalistic government.
Teachers and parents would do well to explode
the notion that all will go well with young men
even though they loaf or study only halfheartedly.
No New Deal can oust old, fundamental laws.
Merit still will tell. The most promising students
will have the most promising careers. Diligence
and intelligence will carry toward the top; mental
and physical laziness will carry downward.
President Walter S. Gifford of the American
Telephone & Telegraph Company, in most re-
spects the world's largest enterprise, has made an
exhaustive study of college records and subse-
quent work records. His research proves con-
clusively that those in the first third of grad-
uating classes achieve far more notably than
those ranking in the bottom third and that the
middle third achieve between the other two.
Large employers, therefore, know what they
are doing when they submit early applications an-
nuallv to leading colleges for the services of their

tions are being filled by men who have enjoyed
thorough education. Indeed, it is becoming rare
for any gigantic corporation or institution to select
as its directing head a man who enjoyed little
schooling.
Dr. Harold W. Dodds, president of Princeton
University, at the opening exercises this week,
aptly said:
"Last winter I received a letter from a
Princeton graduate of almost sixty years'
standing, a distinguished scientist whose con-
crete accomplishments have brought him fame
at home and abroad. He said to tell you that,
contrary to usual opinion, college is not a
preparation for life; it is life itself, as real a life
as you will ever live."
Similarly, there are in business and industry
many young men who reason that their present
position is so obscure that it matters little how
they fill it. They are hopeful that some day
"luck" will bring them a "break." Thereafter
they mean to demonstrate how well they can do.
But if life begins in college - which it assuredly
does -so does it begin for non-college workers in
their very first job.
"Luck" is a poor reed on which to lean.
What constitutes success for the individual?
All of us can't become shining celebrities. All of
us can't scale the summits. But each of us can,
within the measure of his ability, achieve success.
Here is Mr. Gifford's excellent - and heartening
- definition of genuine success:
"Success in life is relative. In my judgment,
success means making the most of such ability,
personality and physique as you have. Don't
measure your success against others, but
against your own potentialities. Never fret
because somebody else has done better. If you
become imbued with this philosophy of life
and sincerely try to do the best you can, and
achieve the sincere feeling that you are doing
the e n nS,, nrn ora no knf nr,, -.nn p-' .r

Exclusive Rolls Map
how can we dodge Saturday classes?
DAILY POEM DEPT.
Now the freshmen throng the campus,
Flood the P Bell, fill U. Hall.
Soph's'll toss 'em in the Huron.
It's a great world after all!
CAMPAIGN DEPT.
We used to Ignore the May Fes-
tival, but that's a little out of sea-
son right now, so we must select some-
thing else to ignore for a while.
how can we dodge Saturday classes?
PHORECASTER DEPT.
Full Moon October -. (We lost our
calendar so we couldn't compute the
results of our computations, but we
know there's a full moon in October.
It must be on a week-end. You fill
it in.)
Two months ago the Phorecaster
predicted rain for Orientation Week.
It rained. For the last five years,
the barograph shows, the Phorecaster
has predicted rain for Orientation
Week. For the last five years, IT
HAS RAINED'OR I ENT A T I O N
WEEK! Howzzat?
CAMPUS OPINION DEPT.
To the Editor:
Please remit $4.89.
Greenman's Cleaners...
how can we dodge Saturday classes?
And, Oh, there a~re so many, many,
many other depts. Lessee:.
WHO CARES DEPT.
ANNOUNCEMENT DEPT.
WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE
DAILY DEPT.
THE INGENUITY OF SOME.
PEOPLE DEPT.
TSK DEPT.
BLANK SPACE DEPT.
AREN'T WE ADEPT
Each one new, different, startling.
Follow the colyum and see.
Just to show you how famous we
are, where did Eddie Guest get his
idea if not from our Daily Poem
Dept? And long before Collier's pre-
cocious moppet Philbert was toothing
on his nickle-plated safety pin, his
cousin Filbert Whoofle was a full-
fledged toaster for Toasted Rolls.
how can we dodge Saturday classes?
As for that upstart Iffy, the Dope,
the Rolls Pherret, our special inves-
tigator, with the aid of the Rolls
Phorecaster, has been predicting
everything from bluebook questions to
triplets for the last ten years. We're
willing to duel Iffy at a trillionth of
one per cent, and give him a handi-
cap of a quintillionth at that.
What's more, Iffy is scared to dope
the World Series.
IFFY DOESN'T DARE DOPE THE
WORLD SERIES,!
Ulr mAXTV1 ..U .T

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1935
VOL. XLVI No. 2
Notices
To Users of the Daily Official Bul-
letin: The attention of users of The
Daily Official Bulletin is respectfully
called to the following:
(1) Notice submitted for publica-
tion must be Typewritten and must be
signed.
(2) Ordinarily notices are pub-
lished but once. Repetition is at the
Editor's discretion.
(3) Notices must be handed to the
Assistant to the President, as Editor
of the Daily Official Bulletin, Room
1021 A. H., before 3:30 p.m. (11:00,
Saturdays).
Senate Reception: The members of
the faculties and their wives are cor-
dially invited to be present at a re-
ception by the President and the
Senate of the University in honor of
the new members of the faculties to
be held on Tuesday evening, October
29, from 8:30 o'clock until 12 o'clock
in the ballrooms of the Michigan
Union. The reception will take place
between 8:30 and 10:00 after which
therewill be an opportunity for
dancing. No individual invitations
will be sent out.
LaVerne Noyes Scholarships: Per-
sons intending to apply for LaVerne
Noyes Scholarships for the present
years are requested to do so before
October 10. Applications should be
made at the President's office, 1017
Angell Hall. World War Veterans
and their blood descendants are
eligible.
Apparatus Exchange: The Regents
at their meeting in March, 1927, au-
thorized an arrangement for the sale
of scientific apparatus by one depart-
ment to another, the proceeds of the
sale to be credited to the budget ac-
count of the department from which
the apparatus is transferred.
Departments having apparatus
which is not in active use are advised
to send descriptions thereof to the
University Chemistry Store, of which
Prof. R. J. Carney is director. The
Chemistry Store headquarters are in
Room 223, Chemistry Building. An
effort will be made to sell the appara-
tus to other departments which are
likely to be able to use it. In some
instances the apparatus may be sent
to the University Chemistry Store o
consignment, and, if it is not sold
within a reasonable time, it will be
returned to the department from
which it was received.
The object of this arrangement is
to promote economy by reducing the
amount of unused apparatus. It i
hoped that departments having suc2
apparatus will realize the advantag
to themselves and to the University
in availing themselves of this oppor-
tunity. Shirley W. Smith.
Earhart Foundation Scholarships:
A limited number of Scholarships
open to qualifying Senior students
have been made available by a grani
from the Earhart Foundation.
The purpose of the Scholarships i
to enable interested students to un-
dertake field studies of communit3
problems in the Detroit area. The
stipend merely covers transportatio
expenses.
Applications will be considered dur:
ing the present week in the office o:
the Department of Sociology, Roon
115, Haven Hall.
Voice Class Lessons. . Professo
James Hamilton of the School o:
Music faculty will continue classes i
voice instruction as a regular part o
the School of Music curriculum dur-
ing the year. Classes for beginner:
will meet from 9:00 to 10:00 and 2:0(
to 3:00 daily; and for advanced stu-
dents from 3:00 to 4:00 daily, in
studio 223 on the mezzanine floor o
the School of Music. All student:
interestedare requested to enroll a
the business office of the School o

Music, and report at these hours. A
nominal fee is charged.
Try-Outs And Rehearsals Uni-
versity Musical Organizations: Uni-
versity Choral Union, Earl V. Moore,
director - try-outs daily 4:00 to 6:00,
mezzanine floor, School of Music,
Maynard Street; James Hamilton,
studio 223, and Nora Hunt, studio
216. Rehearsals, Tuesday evening
7:00 o'clock.
University Symphony Orchestra,
Earl V. Moore, director -try-outs
daily 2:00 to 4:00, library, School of
Music Annex. Thor Johnson in
charge. Rehearsals, Tuesdays an
Thursdays, 3:00 to 5:00. Fridays, 3:01
to 4:00, School of Music Annex.
University of Michigan Glee Clut
David Mattern, director. Rehearsals
Thursdays, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m., third
floor, Michigan Union. .
Freshman Glee Club, David Mat
tern, director. Try-outs, Wednesday,
5:00 tor6:00rp.m., third floor, Michi
gan Union.
Stanley Chorus, Achilles Taliaferrc
director. Try-outs, Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday, October 2, 3, and
4; 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. Rehearsals, Wed-
nesdays 7:30 p.m., Michigan League
University of Michigan Band, Wil
liam D. Revelli, director. Rehearsals

English 230
will meet for
at 5 o'clock in

(Spenser and His Age)
organization Thursday
Room 2213 Angell Hall.
M. P.Tilley.

English 221 (Studies in Tudor and
Stuart Drama) will meet at 4 o'clock
Thursday, October 3 in Room 3212
Angell Hall.
0. J. Campbell.
Students electing German 211
(Gothic) will please meet me to ar-
range hours of meeting on Wednes-
day, Oct. 2, at 5p.m., at 7 E. H.
A. J. Gaiss.
Geology 11: The Tuesday field trip
section will be held; the Thursday
field trip section has been cancelled.
History 91: MWF at 2, will meet in
25 A.H. instead of B. Haven.
Hygiene 211 Race Hygiene: This
course will be given the first semester,
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at
11:00, Room 135 West Medical Build-
ing. Previously, this course was list-
ed for the second semester.
Mathematics 327. Seminar in the
Mathematical Theory of Statistics.
There will be a meeting of those in-
terested to arrange hours Wednesday,
Octo. 2, 2 p.m., 3020 A. H.
Political Science 141, Municipal
Government, will meet in Room 1035
A. H., M. W. F. at 2:00 p.m.
Psych. 33L, 35, 37. All students in
these courses are required to attend
the introductory lecture to the lab-
oratory work, given by Professor
Shepard on Friday, October 4, 4:15
p.m., Room 3126 N. S. Building. As-
signment to laboratory sections will
be made at that time.
Psych. 55. Students who were not
present for the first meeting of this
course are expected to get the ma-
terial for their first assignment on
Friday, October 4 'at 5:00 p.m., in
Room 3122 N. S. Building.
Sociology 201, Field Work: Stu-
dents who have elected field work in
connection with the Social Service
Curriculum should meet me this
Thursday at five o'clock in room 313,
Haven Hall to plan assignments.
Arthur Evans Wood
Sociology 54-Modern Social Prob-
lems -will meet henceforth in Room
35 Angell Hall.
Concerts
Choral Union Concerts. Orders for
season tickets for the Choral Union
concerts may be mailed or left at the
business office of the School of Music
on Maynard Street. All orders will
be filed in sequence and selections
made accordinglv. Prices for season

tact the respective directors accord-
ing to the above schedule.
Academic Notices
Business Administration 171: The
course in Insurance, Business Ad-
ministration 171, will be offered in the
first semester. It will be taught by
Mr. Hampton Irwin of Detroit.
Business Administration 209: This
is a new course in Tabulating Ma-
chine Practice, one hour credit,
Thursday two to three, Tabulating
Office, Angell Hall. Mr. Meacham.
English 1, Sec. 45, meets in Room
3231 Angell Hall.
English 1, Sec. 46, meets in Room
2231 Angell Hall.
English 2, Sec. 5, meets in Room
3212 Angell Hall.
English 1, Sections 44 and 48 drop-
ped.
E. A. Walter.
English 153, Sec. 2 meets in Room
3212 Angell Hall, Thursday, 7:30 to
9:30.
E. A. Walter.
English 197 (English Honors).
Members of this course will meet for
organization on Friday, October 4,
at 4 p.m. in Room 219 Angell Hall.
Warner G. Rice.
English 293 (Bibliography). Mem-
bers of this course will meet for or-
ganization on Thursday, October 3,
at 4 p.m. in 2235 Angell Hall.
Warner G. Rice.
English 297: My Section of English
297 will meet for the first time Mon-
day, October 7, from 7:30 to 9:30 in
Room 407 Library. Members of this
class should consult with me in re-
gard to their plans. Wednesday or
Thursday afternoon of this week, 'in
the Hopwood Room, 3227 Angell
Hall.
R. W. Cowden.
English 297. All students wishing
to work witl'Mr. Weaver will meet in
2218 Angell Hall at 12' o'clock, Oc-
tober 2.

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