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January 19, 1936 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-19

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T HE M I CH IGA N D A ILY

PA4""Mi

PAGE THREE

'Oxford Pledge'
Is Endorsed B
Std URent Union
Policy Adopted Despite
Heated Opposition In
Own Ranks
(By Associated Collegiate Press)
COLUMBUS, 0. Jan. 18. - Despite
heated opposition from within its
own ranks, and in the face of "Com-
munistic" and "revolutionary" charge
from the American Legion, the Amer-
in Stuen Union endorssed the Ox
United States in any war it mighc
conduct, at its convention here.
The union, recently formed by a
mer~ger of the National Student
League and the Student League for
Industrial Democracy, adopted the
endorsement resolution by a 244 to
49 vote. Meanwhile meeting at Kan-
sas City, the National Student Fed-
eration voted, by 49 to 13, not to bear
arms outside the United States.
Ed Kinney, member of the Officers
Club of the R.O.T.C., C.C.N.Y., and a
member of the resolutions committee
of the student union, asserted that
"passage of this resolution definitely
labels the student union as a 'radical'
organization.
Kinney ind others fought the res-
olution on the grounds that the "Ox-
ford Pledge" should be optional with
the individual members, and that its
endorsement would keep prospective
members from enrolling.
American Legion heads, asking that
the union delegates be requested to
leave their convention headquarters
in the Y.M.C.A. building here, charged
that they were "known Communists"
and part of "a revolutionary move-
ment against the government." In-
ability to get a quorum -of the Y.W.-
C.A. directors prevented action.
T Give Report
On Convention1
Missionary From Japan To
Give Talk At Trinity
Luitberan Church
(Continued from Page 1)

President Will Dedicate Memorial To Theodore Roosevelt

-Associated Press Photo.
One Roosevelt will eulogize another when the President dedicates New York state's gigantic $3,590,000
memorial to Theodore Roosevelt. The building, representing more than 16 years of planning, is an annex to
the Museum of Natural history, in New York City. Three murals tutaling 5,280 square feet, depict construc-
tion of the Panama Canal, Roosevelt's activity in the Treaty of Portsmouth which ended the Russo-Japanese
War, and his African adventures.

in paying the diploma fee. The fee
should be paid by the end of Jan-
uary.,
Registration forms for the second
semester will be available in the of-
fice, 1006 Angell Hall, this week.
Graduate students are urged to fill
out the forms in advance of the regu-
lar registration period, which will ex-
tend from wednesday noon to Satur-
dayr noon, Feb. 12, 13, 14 and 1.Fee
15, to avoid payment of the late regis-
tration fee.
C. S. Yoakum, Dean.
Sophomore, College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts: Please be sure
to bring with you the print of your
record which you received last sum-
approva o f second semeste eections.
J. H. Hodges, R. C. Hussey,
Sophomore Academic Counselors.
Conflicts in Final Examinations --
ColegeofEngineering - Instructions
for reporting conflicts between final
examinations are posted on the bulle-
tin board adjacent to my office. Room
3223 East Eng. Bldg. All conflicts
must be reported to me before Jan-
uary 29. J. C. Brier
The Bureau of Appointments ad
Occupational Information is asking
all students who have not yet re-
turned registration materials taken
out in November or later to do so at
once. This material must be re-
turned whether or not the student
concerned has decided to complete
his registration. Please take care of
this matter before Jan. 25. Office
hours, 9:00-12:00; 2:00-4:00, except
Saturday.
The Committee on Saturday ClassesI
will be in session in room 4 U.H. daily
January 20-24 from 2:30-3:30. It will
not hold sessions again until Wednes-
day, Feb. 12.
All Men Students: Students intend-
ing to change their rooms at the end
of the present semester are hereby
reminded that according to the Uni-
versity agreements they are to inform
their landladies of such intention at
least two weeks prior to the close of
the semester, Friday, Feb. 14. It is
advised that notice of such intention
to move be made at once.
J. A. BURSLEY, Dean
Academic Notices
Psychology 39: All those who ex-
pect to elect this course second se-
mester, please leave your names with
the departmental secretary, Room
2125 N.S. If there is a sufficient
number of students, another labora-
tory section will be added.
English 154: My section of English
154, Creative Writing, will meet in the
second semester on Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 10 o'c~ock in Room 403
E"nglish 297: My group in English
297 will not meet on January 20. The

last meeting of the semester will be
January 27. Students wishing con-
sultations during the week of Jan-
uary 20 may leave manuscripts and
sign the schedule in the Hopwood
Room.,
Lecture
Dr. Karl K. Darrow, of the Bell Tel-
ephone Labs. New York will lecture
netism" at 4:10 P.M. on Monday, Jan-
uary 20, in the West Lecture Room of
the West Physics Laboratory.
Concerts
Organ Recital: Palmer Christian,
University organist, will play the fol-
lowing program, Sunday ,Jan. 19, at
4:15 o'clock in Hill Auditorium, to
which the general public, with the
exception of small children, is invited
without admission charge. The au-
dience is requested to be seated on
time, as doors will be closed during
number.
Prelude and Fugue in B, minor . . Bach
Fugue on the "Kyrie" . . . . Couperin
Prelude .. . . .... .. . ... .Clerambault
Prelude on the Gregorian Song
''Pange lingua" .. .. .. . ... .. .Boely
Choral in B minor .. . .. ... ..Franck
Fiat Lux.. . ... .. . .. ... . .. .Dubois
Dreasm (Sonata VI). . . ..Guilmant
Rhapsody Catalane (based on three
Catalonian folk tunes) ... .Bonnet
Aaio (Symphony VI). .. . ..Widor
Mr. Christan will also appear i

No Job Too Large!
No Job Too Small!

recital Wednesdlay afternoon, Jan.
29, at 4:15 o'clock.
Events Of Today
Stalker Hall:
12 noon, class led by Rev. L. L.
Finch on "Was Jesus Religious?"
6:00 p.m., Wesleyan Guild mpeet-
(Continued on Page 4)
TRUSTIES ESCAPE
JACKSON, Jan. 18. - (JP) --Prison
guards were sent to Sycamore, Ill.,
today to return Frank Wangerin and
Robert Moore, trusties who escaped
from one of the farms Sunday. They
fled in an auto owned by Walter Ariss,
foreman at the farm.
RAMSAY-KERN, Inc.
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10:45Cahmrch1e students' Bile class,
under the leadership of H. L. Pick-
erill, will meet at noon. At 6:30
ptm.,George Abernathy, counselor
conventio which was held in ndian
apolis during the Christmas vaca-
tion
The Bethlehem Evangelical Church
today celebrates its fortieth anniver-
sary with a worship service at 10:30
a.m. The sermon will be on "The
Parpose of the Sanctuary." The
Junior League meets at 7 p.m.
A divine, service in German will
be given at 9:30 a.m. at the St. Paul's
Lutheran Church. The regular wor-
shin service with a sermon on "Jesus,
The Light of the World" follows at
10:45 a.m. The Student-Walther
League will hold a skating party at
4 p.m. in -West Park, followed by a
supper and fellowship hour.
The Lutheran Student Club will
meet at 5:30 p.m. in the parish hall
of the Zion Lutheran Church to hear
reports of the Student Volunteer con-
vention by members of the Baptist
Student group who were delegates.
Arthur C. Knudten, of Nagayo,
Japan, who has been a missionary for
the past 16 years, will speak at 10:30
am, at the Trinity Lutheran Church.
Mr. Knudten is now on leave, and
will speak in Detroit churches dur-
ing the coming week.

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Predicts Auto Windshields
Will Be Unbreakable By
Use Of Plastics
By WILLIAM SHACKLETON
That the houses, furniture, auto-
mobiles, typewriters - and just about
everything else of a material nature
--of the future may be made not of
metal or wood or glass but of artifi-
cial plastics such as bakelite, pyrox-
alin, and rubber and synthetic rubber
products was the fascinating possi-
bility held out by Prof. F. ,E. Bartell
of the chemistry department yester-
day.
"Hardly a week passes"- Professor
Bartell pointed out, "without some
new adaptation of plastics being
made. Refrigerators, doors, automo-
bile gears are some examples of plas-
:ics' intrusion in the former domain
)f other substances. Probably auto-
nobile windshields will soon be prac-
tically unbreakable as plastics replace
glass there."
Plastics are very nearly an ideal
construction,A Professor B art em
expensive in the pure state as present,
their usable volume can be greatly
ncreased during manufacture by the
a.ddition of wood filler. Also there
.s available an almost unlimited sup-
pAy of the raw materials from which
the plastics are synthesized.
From their natural composition
and the large proportion of wood
filler used, commercial plastics are
as light or lighter than most woods,
utare much stronger. Bescause teir
by air, moisture, and practically all
)ther corrosive substances, they can
be left unprotected out-of-doors for
Te fiact etha dsplastics are almost
unbreakable under most conditions
should give them another advantage
over their rivals. When research has
developed somewhat cheaper man-
ufacturing methods for transparent
PO AMS BIDS STATIONERY
THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown, North of Postoffice

plastics, glass may well look to its
markets. Plastics are readily made
fireproof too, Professor Bartell stat-
ed.
Still other important properties of
the plastics include their non-con-
ductivity of electricity, hardness, and
naturally lustrous appearance which
makes them decorative as well as use-
ful.
Present applications of the various
plastic substances mentioned by Pro-
fessor Bartell ranged from drinking
cups to steamship interiors and frame
work and from arm-chairs to golf
clubs. However, that is only a drop in
the bucket to the application which
he foresees in the future, applica-
tions which hq believes may introduce
the "Plastic Age."
Fssm I S ubject
Of Weekl60Iy Forum
DFascism - An Alternative to
Democracy" is the topic chosen for
discussion by the Ann Arbor Com-
held at 4 pm. toay inthe auditoriumn'
othPerry Sho.
Questions and discussions by mem-
bers of the audience will constitute
the major part of the forum session.
Discussion leaders will be Prof. Rob-
ert C. Angell of the sociology depart-
ment, and Mr. Russell West, teacher
of social studies at Ann Arbor High
School.
"Communism - An Alternative to
Democracy" has been announced as
the subject of the next forum ses-
sion to be held on Feb. 2.

Christian Will Give
Two Organ Recitals
Palmer Christian, University organ-
ist, will appear in two recitals before
the close of the current semester at
4:15 p.m. today and Wednesday, Jan.
29.
For today's concert, Mr. Christian
has chosen a program by famous
French organists from the time of
Couperin down to the present, choos-
ing, as far as is consistent with a
balanced program, examples from
their compositions that have reached
popularity.
This program will open with the
B minor Prelude and Fugue by Bach,
as a tribute to the great devotion
French organists have had for this
master composer.
The program Jan. 29 will contain
three works by American composers
that have been dedicated to Mr.
Christian: a Sonata for organ by
Philip James, the Suite entitled "A
Chinese Garden" by Eric DeLamar-
ter and Leo Sowerby's Choral Pre-
lude on the familiar hymn-tune "Re-
joice, Ye Pure in Heart."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULL ETIN
SUNDAY, JAN. 19, 1936
VOL. XLVI. No. 80
Notices
Graduate School: All graduate stu-
dents who expect to complete their
worsk for a degree at the close of the
present semester should call at office
of the Graduate School, 1006 Angell
Hall, to check their records and to
secure the proper blank to be used

110 East Liberty

DIAL 3110

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Choral Union
Concerts
HILL AUDITORIUM -__
THE KOLISCH STRING QUARTET.
RUDOLPH KOLISCH, First Violinist
FELIX KHUNER, Second Violinist
EUGENE LEHNER, Viola
BENAR HEIFETZ, Violoncellist
Monday, January 20
BERNARDINO MOLINARI
Guest Conductor, The Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Friday, January 24
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone
Monday, February 17
MYR A HFCE Pnniet

A NOT HE R R EASON
W HY GOL DMA N IS
FIRSTI N DRY
CL EA NING VA L UE
Craftsmen
... No Hurried
Piece-Workers
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