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January 19, 1936 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1936-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,"HE MICIGAN rDAILV

SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 1939

U

Long-Lost Antarctic Explorer Is Found

-Associabect Press Photo.
Word of the dramatic rescue of Lincoln Ellsworth (above) and Her-
bert Hollick-Kenyon in the Antarctic was flashed to civilization by the
British Royal relief ship Discovery II; which found them safely en-
camped on the face of the great ice barrier at Little America. A projected
flight across Antarctic wastes failed because their fuel had become
exhausted.
Dorothy Thompson Oratorical
Lecturer, Has Meteoric Career

Liquor Control
By State Seen
As Big Issue
Gov. Fitzgerald Declares
State Has No Business In
Liquor Problem
LANSING, Jan. 19. - (/P - The
controversy over whether the state
should be in the liquor business
reached a stage today where political
leaders believed it will have to be
accepted as a campaign issue.
Indications were that major par-
ties will have to eoate the problem
in their conventions and take a stand
in their platforms. The fight evi-
dently will carry not only through
this year's political debates but into
the next legislature for final settle-
ment.
Gov. Fitzgerald, the official lead-
er of the Republican party, reiterat-
ed that he believes the state "has no
business" in the liquor business. He
contended the state should limit its
activity in this direction to regulation
and the collection of revenue.
Debate Store System
The state store system promises to
be the hub of the argument. Fitz-
gerald intimated he might not object
to a state monopoly on purchase of
liquor, but insisted retail vending of
liquor should be left to "taxpaying
merchants." He said that as long as
the state is in the liquor business to
the present extent the system will be
liable to charges of corruption and to
political manipulation.
Frank A. Picard, Democratic leader
and former chairman of the liquor
control commission, favors continu-
ance of the state store system. He
holds the opinion that liquor can be
dispensed in a more orderly manner,
and with greater profit to the state,
through liquor stores than in any
other manner. His view is shared by
former Gov. William A. Comstock
and other chiefs of the Democratic
party.
Indirect Vote Expected
If the parties take a definite stand
the people will have an opportunity
to cast an indirect vote for or against
the state store system. Their ballots
presumably would do much to in-
fluence the next legislature. While
it is within the province of the liquor
control commission to do away with
the store system by merely abolishing
the state stores, it is conceded gen-
erally that the system probably will
not be uprooted unless the legislature
so directs. Legislation to regulate
the profits and methods of handling
and warehousing would be deemed
necessary before the state store sys-
tem could be wiped out.
The governor's contention that the
state should get out of the liquor
business is supported largely by those
opposed to any invasion of private
business by the government. It also
has the backing of certain groups
which believe that any state liquor
system involving the army of em-
ployes and the various ramifications
of buying and selling liquor will soon-
er or later be put to political uses.

LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY, carefully washed in soft
water and hand ironed. Reason-
able. Telephone 7287. 11x
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices

reasonable. Free delivery.
3006.

Phone
6x

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
darned

WANTED
WANTED: To rent garage in terri-
tory between campus and East
Kingsley. Call 2-1167 evenings.
207
I WOULD plan and cook for a fra-
ternity or sorority next semester.
Experienced and references given.
Box 215A, Mich. Daily 212
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox

FOR RENT - ROOMS
ROOMS for girls both double and
single. Mrs. Andrus, 909 E. Uni-
versity. Phone 2-1136. 203
LARGE double front room, first floor.
Two single rooms, second floor. 327
S. Division. Phone 3823. 205
SINGLE ROOM desirable for male
student. Will discount suitably if
taken today. 1317 Geddes. 210
FOR RENT: Double and single rooms
for boys; board if desired. 727 East
University. Phone 7472. 193
DOUBLE and single rooms for girls.
Board if desired. Call 4018. 202

LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Phi Eta Sigma key.
call D. N. Sweeney. 4917.

darned
lx
Please
204

LOST: Lady's white gold wrist watch
with metal band. Call 475'. 206

LOST: Theta Phi Alpha;
Reward. F. Schrauder.

sorority pin.
Call 4018.
197

Gains Success By Unique
Combination Of Luck,
PersonalAbility
Dorothy Thompson, wife of Sin-
clair Lewis and widely-known as a
foreigncorrespondent, feature writer
for Saturday Evening Post and au-
thor of "The New Russia" and "I Saw
Hitler," will speak next Thursday at
Hill Auditorium.
She will lecture on the subject
"Rediscovering America," and is ex-
pected to include in her talk a type
of analysis of conditions in America
similar to that presented in Sinclair
Lewis' latest book "It Can't Happen
Here."
When Dorothy Thompson and Sin-
clair Lewis were married, people who
were interested in them wondered if
she would abandon her own literary
career. Her present lecture tour and
her recent magazine articles are
ample evidence that matrimony does
not interfere with journalism as far
as she is concerned.
Combines Luck and Ability
Her career as a journalist repre-
sents a unique combination of per-
sonal ability and good fortune. The
"lucky breaks" she has received as a
newspaper correspondent are de-
scribec by herself in a recent article.
"Ten years ago," she writes, "I decid-
ed to go to Europe. _ I went to a
steamship office and told them I
wanted passage on the next boat
wherever it was going. The destina-
tion happened to be England. I had
an idea that I would be able to do
some newspaper articles, but not the
faintest notion where they would be
published."
Arriving in Europe, she for no par-
ticular reason, went to Ireland and
talked with Terrence MacSwiney, and
two hours after she left his office he
was arrested. Upon her return to
London, she was greeted with news-
paper headlines of MacSwiney's hun-
ger strike, and her interview - one ofj
those lucky breaks - was printed at
once.

While commissioned by the Red
Cross doing publicity work in Paris,
she was sent to Budapest and ar-
rived inside the lines just following
the arrest of Emperor Karl and
Princess Zita. Without assignment
from any paper she obtained per-
mission to interview the Crown Prince
in the castle where he was held pris-
oner. It was a "scoop" and the next
day the story was sent speeding
around the world.
An additional flourish of luck sur-
rounded Dorothy Thompson only re-
cently, when Chancellor Hitler put
her on the front pages of the press
of Europe and America by expelling
her from Germany in August, 1934.
Has Unique Interview Method
As to her own part in the success
she has attained in journalism,
friends who know her attribute a
major portion of that success to her
unique tactics in the development
of news stories and interviews. A
typical method of hers will be to
approach some personage to be inter-'
viewed, who refuses to talk, and in-
sinuate to him that he is in sympathy
with whatever she knows to be his pet
aversion. More than likely the in-
terviewee will not only begin talking
but, in denying the accusations, come
out with his real opinions.
Tickets for the lecture, priced at
50 to 75 cents, may be obtained from
Wahr's State street bookstore.
SHOE SHOW OPENS
GRAND RAPIDS, Jan. 18. -(A-) -
The Michigan Shoe Exhibitors Asso-
ciation and the Kent County retail
shoe dealers will open a style show
here Sunday. More than 50 exhibi-
tors are expected to participate.
e.I

CLASSIFIED ADVERT 1NG

FOR SALEI
TUBULAR shoe skates. Ladies size
eight. In good condition. Campus
Bootery, 304 South State. Call
6238. 208
FOR SALE: Tuxedo at 507 S. Division
and sheeplined jacket. 209
FOR SALE: Tuxedo dinner jacket,
double breasted, size 38, which is
too small for owner. In excellent
condition, a real bargain. For in-
formation, call 8937. 211
NOTICES
DRESSMAKING: Formals for J-Hop
time. 1208 S. University. Phone
2-2020. 12x
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
STATIONERY: Printed with your
noae and address. 100 sheets, 100
envelopes. $1.00.yMany styles.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard. 9x
ONIONS ON SALE
GRANT, Jan. 18.-- VP) -The an-
nual onion market opened here Friday
with buyers from Michigan, Ohio,
Pennsylvania and Indiana in attend-
ance. It was estimated by William
Smith, government inspector, that
more than half of this year's crop still
was in storage.
DEAN OF ARTISTS DIES
PARIS, Jan. 18. -- (IP) -Charles
Lazare, 79, dean of American artists
in Paris, died at the American hos-
pital today after a long illness.

featured sunday dinners
breaded veal tenderloin steak. . . 50c
grilled small beef tenderloin steak. . 50c
grilled sizzling lamb chops... 50c
good food - good service - nice surroundings
hut cellar dance sunday nine to eleven
the the
h tfingerle operated hu

maa,...

.t'^TPT. .:.'C!0tRIO i;T.'~v:r
9/o cAU

We'll help you, if you need extra cash.
Any employed man or woman can get
$300, $200, $100 or less from us, with-
out delay ... and repay in small monthly
installments. Come in, write, or 'phone us.

i

Today - Mon. - Tues.
MARX BROS.
"A NIGHT AT THE OPERA"
ANN SOTH ERN
"GRAND EXIT"
WALT DISNEY presents
"COCK OF THE WALK"
A Silly Symphony in Technicolor

I

PERSONAL FINANCE COMPANY

..a

rn++wr ^ s i r

77777-N

Second Floor Wolverine Bldg., Room 208
208 East Washington Street
Phone 4000 Ann Arbor
4001 (Corner Fourth Avenue)

11°'

-
-::.

..:.

I.

PRICES
25c till 2 P.M.
Thereafter,
All Seats 35c

SHOWS - 1 - 3 - 5 - 7 - 9 P.M.
NOW SHOWING

SHOWS
Continuous
Today, 1 to 11.

INSTRUCTIONS

I1

III

THE STORY THAT THRILLED MILLIONS
at last on the talking screen in
M-G-M's $1,000,000 PRODUCTION!
R OH AL D

T s
TODAY 25c UNTIL 2 P.M.
" Where is that 'Falls' guy, anyway?"
He can't have stood up Claudette? But then
you never can tell what'll happen in this rip-
roaring comedy romance of a couple of
youngsters who fight their way to. the altar.

i

I""

11=7

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!
, 3' f .. y.

1 ' -
* P
? r
.. :. t.
4
i1 '\ .
. ,, , "1
/ .
,
r
1

4

Reach 10,000 People
for as little as
Cheap? Figure it out for your-
self. Effective? The people
who use the want ads regular- (Niwnimum charge
ly know that it is! Easy? Just for a three-line ad
a matter of picking up a tele- inserted one time.
phone and calling our ad- Additional inser-
taker! What more could you tions only a little
want . . . whether it's rooms more.)

r Adolh ra u nf
(IRUDETTE (OLERT aud FRED MACMURRAY
.J rm p maw ise nng

II Another Screen Triumph by the Producers of

1111

III

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