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October 02, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tur. i11IG1N1 AILV

AVEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1936

Msndates Left
By Long Are
Put In Effect
Legislature Continues Its
Inquiry Into Louisiana
Dictator's Death
BATON ROUGE, La., Oct. 1. -(A)
- Huey Long's last legislative man-
dates -37 of them - became law
today as the administration he left
behind him pushed an investigation
into his assassination.
Long started the program through
a special session of the legislature
three weeks ago but was struck down
by a bullet before the work of enact-
ing the statutes was completed. The
legislature, however, went ahead and
finished the task.
Meanwhile, the state constabulary
which Long set up to rule Louisiana,
had a court order to inspect all long-
distance telephone calls made from
Baton Rouge on Sept. 8, the night
the Senator was shot as he walked
in a statehouse corridor.
Long was fatally wounded by Dr.
Carl A. Weiss, Jr., whose wife's fath-
er, Judge B. H. Pavy of Opelousas,
was threatened with the loss of his
office by one of the acts in the legis-
laturse.
That act, removing Judge Pavy to
another judicial district in which
Long assertedly controlled more vot-
ing strength, was included in the last
of 37 just placed in operation.
Several laws aimed at the adminis-
tration of President Roosevelt, with
which Long was at bitter odds, be-
came effective today.
One makes it a criminal offense
for federal agents to expend money
in Louisiana for purposes not spe-
cifically authorized under the United
States Constitution.
Another authorizes the governor
and state attorney-general to sue in
the United States Supreme Court
to determine the right of the federal
government to spend money in Lou-
isiana through various bureaus and
agencies.
The order for authority to scru-
tinize telephone calls was issued by
the district court here to Gov. 0. K.
Allen and Attorney-General Gaston
L. Porterie. It gives Brigadier-Gen-
eral Louis Guerre, superintendent of
the state bureau of identification and
investigation, the power to study the
calls.,
Asked what he intended to show by
the record, Gen. Guerre replied:
"Plenty!"
F.D.R. Pleads
That Liberals
GetTogether
Asks That They Find A
Common Ground, Make
Some Concessions
(Continued from Page 1)
to understand the trials and the great
difficulties under which such a large
number of our people labor. I have
tried to visualize the insecurities that
have beset the lives of millions of our
families.
"It is true, as shown not by the
figures alone, but by the spirit of the
great mass of Americans in every
part of the country, that we have
come through stormy seas into fair
weather. Patience is receiving its re-
ward. Faith is being justified. Hope
is being fulfilled.
"It is true that we who are en-
trusted with the responsibilities of

Government have labored toward
this end, but the greatest factor in
the improvement has been the cour-
age of the American people them-
selves. Without your help, our labors
would have availed far less.
"We have taken many steps to
protect the family and the individ-
ual against many of the natural vicis-
situdes of life. We have moved for-
ward to give greater security to the
unemployed and to the aged. We
have sought sound means to our end.
"Years ago, President Wilson told
me a story. He said that the greatest
problem that the head of a progres-
sive democracy had to face was not
the criticism of reactionaries nor the
attacks of those who would set up
another form of government, but
rather to reconcile and unite progres-
sive liberals themselves.
"The overwhelming majority of
liberals all seek the same end, the
same ultimate objectives. But be-
cause they see far beyond the end
of their own noses, they are very'
apt to want to reach that goal by
different roads. People who do not
want to move forward in the im-
provement of civilization are content
to stand in one spot and these people
find it. easy to remain united in de-
manding inaction.
"Liberals, therefore, in order to
make their efforts successful, must
find common grounds and a com-
mon road, each making some conces-
sion as to form and method in ordei
that all may obtain the substance of

Distillery Devastated By Tropical Hurricane
- ~ ~

Validity Of AAA
Decided Soon By
Supreme Court

I Classied Directory

High Court To
Case; Decision
Christmas

Expedite
Likely By

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-Associated Press Photo.
This picture shows heavy damage that was done to the plant of a
Cuban distilling company at Cienfugos by the tropical hurricane which
causdd extensive damage in several areas of the island.
Papers Found By Dr. Stanton
Throw Light On Chinas Past

(Continued from Page 1)
tion but a sort of unified United
States. There is a truce at present in
its civil war."
Dr. Stanton declared that for every
move made for power and influence
in China by Russia, there is a count-
er move by Japan. "It looks very
much as if the two countries cannot
help but come to blows sooner or
later," he stated.
Dr. Stanton made several extended
trips into the interior of China. En-
route to barren Northern Manchuria,
he found evidences on every hand of
the recent Chino-Japanese "war." A
train he took through this land,
which he says looks like Eastern Ne-
brabka, was two days afterwards held
up by bandits, and its 500 passengers
were kidnapped.
"T was rather glad," he said with a
laugh, "to get out of that territory.
Yok could never tell what might
happen."
He was also in Harbin where he
saw the gradual taking over of the
famed Chinese Eastern Railway by
Japanese.
While in Shan-si, a northern Chin-
our children grow up, they will still
have problems to overcome. It is for
us, however, manfully to set our-
selves to the task of preparation for
them so that to some degree the dif-
ficulties they must overcome may
weigh upon them less heavily.
"I am confident that the people of
the Nation, having put their shoulder
to the wheel, will build a better fu-
ture for the children of the days to
come."
After he had delivered his address,
Mr. Roosevelt and his party motored
to the University of Southern Cali-
fornia where he was presented with
a doctor of laws degree. After making
a brief response, he and his entour-
age made a tour of the city.
To Urge Coughili
Into New Deal Fold
WASHINGTON, Oct. 1. -- (/) A
personal effort to align Father
Charles E. Coughlin and his followers
behind President Roosevelt in the
1935 campaign was planned today by
Senator Thomas (Dem., Okla.)
He told newsmen that in a confer-
ence scheduled for later this week
with the Detroit priest, he frankly
will urge Coughlin to back the New
Deal for achieving "a liberal Demo-
cratic party."
Thomas and Coughlin have worked
in close harmony for monetary pol-
icies and cash payment of the bonus
through currency expansion. The
Oklahoman expressed dissatisfaction
with Mr. Roosevelt's silver program
and failure to devalue the dollar fur-
ther, but said:
"There has been considerable talk
of a third party combining the Town-
"endites, share - the - wealth and
Coughlin followers. I have always
opposed any thirdd party.
"While there are some features of
the administration program I am not
.n sympathy with, the trend is right.
rhat is what we should work to push
ahead."
Coughlin recently visited President
Roosevelt at Hyde Park, N.Y. in a
:onference whose subject matter
aas never been disclosed.

ese province, he visited ancient caves
and saw the famous sculpture of the
Wei dynasty, more than 1,500 years
old.
When Dr. Stanton left Peiping in
April ,the weather was almost tropi-
cal ,he said, but when he arrived in
Northern Manchuria, he found the
rivers frozen.
"The Japanese," Dr. Stanton said,
"are enjoying a wave of prosperity."
While in Tokio, he studied at the li-
brary of the Imperial University of
Japan, Toyo Banko, which has the
largest collection of books on the
Far East in the Orient.
Returning by the way of Singapore
and the Red Sea, Dr. Stanton wit-
nessed Italian transports carrying
hordes of Black Shirts to Ethiopian
borders. He also stopped in Djibouti,
terminus of the railroad from French
Somililand to Addis Ababa, visited
Egypt, Italy and Paris on his home-
ward route, and returned to Ann
Arbor in early August.
1 Duce Wants
Olympic Games
Held In Tokio
Relinquishment Of Italian
Claims Seen As Bid For
JapaneseSympathy
TOKIO, Oct. 1.-- (P)-Count
Michimasa Soyejima, member of the
Japanese Olympic Preparations Com-
mittee, announced today the receipt
of a letter from Premier Benito Mus-
solini, repeating a promise that Italy
would withdraw its claims to hold the
1940 Olympic games at Rome, in sup-
port of Tokio claims.
Diplomatic quarters interpreted this
as a move to gain Japanese sympathy
for Italy in the East African crisis.
Japanese authorities have insisted
that Mussolini made a similar prom-
ise to Soyejima last February, when
the latter visited Rome, but at the
meeting of the Olympic Committee in
March in Oslo, Italy reasserted its
claims and blocked acceptance of
Tokio's invitation.
It was understood that IL Duce sent
his later letter to Soyejima on the
advice of Giacinto Auriti, Italian am-
bassador to Japan, that such a gesture
would be timely since Japan's ambi-
tions to obtain the 1940 Olympics
had become a national issue.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 1. - (Al) -
There is a strong probability that the
supreme court will give the nation a
decision by Christmas on the validity
of the administration's agricultural
program.
Ordinarily, a final ruling on the
challenge of the government's pro-
cessing taxes - upon which the AAA
program depends - by the Hoosac
Mills Corporation of Massachusetts
would take much longer than Christ-
mas. But the course of the AAA de-
pends largely on the decision, and the
farm administration has indicated it
wants the matter expedited. In such
cases, the supreme court usually
agrees to speedy procedure.
This is by far the most far-reaching
case awaiting action by the court
which begins its fall term next Mon-
day.
Attack Processing
The Hoosac controversy attacks
the constitutionality of processing
taxes levied on cotton and other basic
agricultural commodities. For in-
stance, when cotton is changed into
cloth and wheat converted into flour'
a tax is imposed. The AAA act also
assessed articles or commodities
which already had been processed.
That was called a floor stock tax.
Money thus derived is used for
rental and benefit payments to farm-
ers who agree to control of production
or to withdraw land from cultivation.
In the lower courts, the govern-
ment has both won and lost. Elisha
H. Brewster, federal district judge at
Boston, upheld the act against the
contention that it illegally bestowed
taxing power upon administrative of-
ficers. But the circuit court of ap-
peals at Boston, in a two to one de-
cision, held the act unconstitutional.
Powers Exceeded
"It is clear, we think," the latter
ruling said, "that under the recent
decision in the Schechter Poultry cor-
poration case (which upset NRA)
that Congress at the outset has at-
tempted to invade a field over which
it has no control, since its obvious
purpose, viz., to control or regulate
the production of agriculture be-
yond the power of Congress.''
"Congress cannot delegate legisla-
tive powers to the executive depart-
ment," the decision said in another
place.
Asof July 1, the latest date for
which figures are available, the AAA
had collected $897,645,243 in process-
ing taxes.
NEW SEATS
The very latest in Perfect comfort
MAJESTIC

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
?advertising Department. Phone 2-1214.
The classified columns close at five
Yclock previous to day of insertign.
Box numbers may be secured at no
extra charge.
Cash in advance Ile per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or more
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
insertions.
Telep onesrate -15c per reading line
for two or more insertions.
10% discount if paid within ten days
Minimumnthree lines per insertion.
from the date of last insertion.
By contract, per line - 2 lines daily, one
month.............. .............80
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ...........3c
2 lines daily, college year........7c
4 lines E.O.D., college year ........7c
100 lines used as desired ..........9c
300 lines used as desired..........8c
1,000 lines used as desired.........7c
2,000 lines used as desired ........6c
the above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
Ionic type, upper and lower case. Add
5c per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face. upper and lower case. Add 10c
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 71,1 point
type.

STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
LAUNDRY Wanted. Student and
Co-ed. Men's shirts 10c. Silks,
wools our specialty. All bundles
done separately - no markings.
Personal satisfaction guaranteed.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594
anytime until 7:00. Silver Laundry
607 E. Hoover. 4x
POSITIONS WANTED
CHEF, male, white, local references.
Wants fraternity position. Can
take full charge. Reply 11151/ S. U.
13
FOR SALE
Streamlined bicycles. Speedometers,
electric lights, chromium finish,
Baltimore Lunch on State, 6 to 9
p.m. 8
NOTICES
TEACHER of popular and classical
piano music. Helen Louise Barnes.
Call 8469. 2x

LAUNDRY
WANTED: Student and family laun-
dry. Reasonable rates. Will call
for and deliver. Phone 2-3669.
11
EXPERIENCED laundress, doing stu-
dents' laundry. Will call for and
deliver. Telephone 4863. 7x

FOR RENT: To faculty member or
man student highly desirable first
floor suite. Private bath. Phone
3280. 17
THREE ROOMS in private home for
girls with home privileges. Garage.
5 Marshall Ct. off S. Division, after
3 o'clock. 5'287. 22
SUITE with private bath and shower,
accommodating three. Extra room
if desired. Steam heat, garage.
Dial 8544. 422 E. Washington. 23
SINGLE ROOM: Three blocks from
campus. Mrs. Justice, 1338 Wash-
tenaw. Apt. 6. 10

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black leather zipper note-
book, with Advance standing sheet
inside. Reward. G. H. Goldstone.
Phone 3590. 21
LOST: Saturday night, yellow gold
woman's Hamilton wrist watch.
Finder please call 3718. Ample re-
ward. 6

s

4'

Anoell Impressed By Belgian
Stoicism At Death Of Queen

2 SINGLE ROOMS : Clean, comfort-
able, $2 and $2.50. I'arking space
A. F. Phornburg. 1230 Broadway.
Dial 2-2849. 7
NICELY FURNISHED rooms for
graduate women. Call 2-2057. 16
923 Greenwood near East University,
2 rooms and bath. Heat, light, gas,
phone, $25.25 a month. Phone
2-2362. 26
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
NURSERY SCHOOL: Children three
to five years; for information call
Miss MacNaughton, 5837. 20
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
Call the Kempf Music Studios for
artistic piano tuning. Terms rea-
sonable. Phone 6328. 15
MAC'S TAXI- 4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
WANTED
MARRIED COUPLE to earn room
and board in private family. Must
have car. Phone 2-2704. 9
ROOMMATE wanted: Nice clean
room, 3 blocks from campus. $2.25
a week. 820 Arch. Phone 6644. 21

FOR RENT
NICELY furnished single or suite,
545 Thompson.
DOUBLE ROOM on first floor with
private entrance. Good location.
Meals if desired. Call 5694. Rea-
sonable rates. 914 S. State. 24

SINGLE ROOM: 1213 South State.
Private home. One other student
in house. Near Field House. 25

Stoicism evidenced by Belgians at
the death of Queen Astrid wassthe
thing that most impressed Prof. Rob-
ert Angell of the sociology depart-
Sylvia Sidney Weds
New York Publisher
PHOENIX, Ariz., Oct. 1. - (P) -
Sylvia Sidney, screen actress, and
Bennett Cerf, New York publisher,
were married today by Superior Judge
Marlin T. Phelps at a hotel here.
The film star arrived here by air-
plane from Hollywood and was met
by Cerf, who had flown here from
New York several hours before.
At the airport, Cerf embraced the
actress and exclaimed: "Little Sylvia
risked her life for me."
Miss Sidney's plane had been forced
to land at Bartow, and Cerf spent
three anxious hours at the airport
here.

ment this summer when he attended
the International Institute of So-
ciology convention in Belgium.
"There was no more weeping than
there could have been when Huey
Long was killed," said Professor An-
gell. "Evidently the queen was well
liked but nobody got agitated over
her death. It was a negligible event
from a political point of view as com-
pared to the significance the king's
death might have hac," he continued.
Professor Angel! read a paper on
Social Theory and Social Research
before the members of the con-
vention in Brussels, Belgium, from
August 25 to 29.
About 75 sociologists from all over
the world were present, including five
other eminent sociologists from this
country.
"Because of the tension in the
danger spots throughout Europe, the
speakers steered clear of controversial
questions," said Professor Angell.

I', i:

The TIME SHOP
For WATCHES
1 121 South University Ave.

I

MICHIGAN

I

Matinees at 2 and 3:30
Evening Shows at 7 and 9
PRICES
Matinees & Bal. Evenings 25c
[lVain Floor Eve. 35c - Children 10c

...........NOW .........
THESE TWOLOVED

GREAT
6th. ANNIVERSARY
and REMODELING

S

E I

i

Starts Thursday, Oct. 3rd
KLINE'S is celebrating its 6th Anniversary
by offering hundreds of Special Values. Here
are just a few of the bargains:
FOR THE MISS:

i
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DAILY 1:30 to 11 P.M.
WH ITNEY
15c to 6 P.M. - 25c after 6
Now
GRACE MOORE
"LOVE ME
FORE VER"
Extra
COLOR CARTOON
LATEST NEWS
LOWELL THOMAS
-- Tri rsday
PAT O'BRIEN
DOLORES DEL RIO

FUR TRIMMED COATS, $20. Values.

$13.88

G RE TA
M AM
F REDR C
ARin
with FRItP)I
BARTHOLOMEW
(of "DAVID COPPERFIELD" fame)

STUNNING FALL DRESSES, $5.95 Values ........:
SMART FALL HATS, $1 .49 Values
NOVELTY SKIRTS, BLOUSES, SWEATERS, $2.50 Val.
RINGLESS CHIFFON and SERVICE HOSE, spec., 2 prs."
SATIN and SILK CREPE LINGERIE. ............
WOMEN'S NOVELTY PAJAMAS at Only.
HAND-TURNED LEATHER SOLE SLIPPERS.

$3.66
74c
$1.66
$1.00
.98c
98c
.99c

FOR THE MAN:
TAILORED ALL-WOOL SUITS, worth $15.00.... $11.75
GENUINE SUEDE ZIPPER JACKETS, worth $5.00. $3.77
NOVELTY WORSTED SLACKS, Values to $3.50 ..$2.66
FANCY BACK and ZIPPER SWEATERS, special $1.98
FUSED COLLAR ATTACHED SHIRTS, $1.00 Values 68c
HAND TAILORED LINED TIES, worth 55c.-.-. . .39c

j

- Todayand Thursday

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