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December 07, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-07

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1935

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

V=-

111

The HOT
STOVE
By BILL REED

It

ELMER is our mail man and, a la
Schopenhauer and John William
Thomas, the salt of the earth - a
real sports fan. (Elmer lost $20 by
betting on a 21-point margin against
Ohio State. and he has had the de-
cency not to recall that his wager
was laid after we had confidentially
told him we would lay our shirt on
such a bet).
Elmer has been watching Michigan
teams for about 15 years, and he
probably knows as much football as
any other grandstand quarterback,
but right now he's pretty disgusted
with the Michigan system.
It isn't that he thinks the
Michigan system isn't a winner-
in fact it is because the system is
employed only to win games that
he criticizes it.
For Elmer likes to see flashy foot-
ball. It's not that he doesn't ap-
preciate good football as Michigan
teams in the past have shown it, for
he recognizes that the strongest elev-
ens he ever saw are those very same
teams.
But Elmer knows that when Mich-
igan has the ball with the score in its
favor the play will be once or twice
into the line then a punt, or when
Michigan gets past midfield and the
lead against it the second play will
be a pass, and all executed with no
more distinction than the precision
which players supremely versed in
fundamentals show.
And he doesn't like that. The
plays which linger most in his mem-
ory are those passes which Harry
Newman was wont to unleash, and
the best play of the year to him was
Southern Methodist's pass on fourth
down for a touchdown. What if
those plays do lose ball games, he
says, they look so much better.
All of which is very significant,
because it is what Mr. Farley,
Mr. Fletcher and a number of
others are continually looking
for, the opinion of the man in the
street -in this case Mr. Average
Fan.
But Elmer's views will have no
effect on the Michigan coaching staff,
for they are out to win ball games
with a system which is recognized as
the most fundamental in the game
and one on which many of the more
famous offenses have been built.
Given superior material which has
a will to play football simply to get
more points than the opponent, the
Michigan team can meet any other,
team of equal talent with the odds
on it to win because once ahead, the
lead is rarely lost through an inop-
portune play.
And the best part of the Michi-
gan system is that, devoted to
fundamentals as it is, it can
transform itself into the most de-
ceptive scoring machine neces-
sary in a moment, and with a
maximum of effect. Probably the
most famous scoring play in the
country is "Old 83" and without
doubt the best executed scoring
play of the 1935 season was the
lateral-forward which scored for
Michigan against Pennsylvania.
In short, the Michigan system is
one which combines a maximum of
safety with a maximum of effective-
ness and because coaches believe that
combination is the one to win ball
games and because that is what they
are out to do, Elmer and his as-
sociates will have to content them-
selves with seeing their favorite style
of play perhaps a half-dozen times a
season as executed by a Michigan
team.
Yale Omitted From
Army Grid Schedule
WEST POINT, N. Y., Dec. 6.-(A')
- Army's nine-game football sched-
ule for 1936, announced today, will
find the Cadets renewing relation-
ships with four old rivals, and meet-

ing two newcomers in addition to
their traditional games.
Yale is not on the schedule for the
first time since 1920, and the Cadets
will play Columbia in New York Oct.
10, for the first time since 1925, and
play host to Colgate's Red Raiders,
Oct. 31, in the eleventh of a series.
FRESHMAN FOOTBALL TEAM
All freshman football numeral
winners are asked to come to a
very important meeting to be held
at 8:00 p.m. Monday at the Mich-
gan Union.
Coach Harry Kipke

By ALAN GOULD
(Associated Press Sports Writer)
New York, Dec. 6. - The 135 col-
lege football season, one of the most
spectacular of post-war years, has
produced an all-American team qual-
ified in nearly every respect to take
its place among the nost accomp-
lished in the gridiron hall of fame .. .
The pick of the country's talent
lines up today in mythical formation,
answering the eleventh annual Asso-
ciated Press roll-call and bringing to
a climax the collegiate career of

ously the East and Far West, al- Although no college places more out doubt the greatest all-around I America calibre this year has been
l though producing a few fine teams than a single player on this year's back the Big Ten has known since more than offset by the develop-
have lost ground in the all-star first all-America, the individual the palmy days of Red Grange. ment of a superb crop of tackles, a
scramble. strength of the country's outstanding Better Than Grange
The South gains four of the eleven teams is reflected in the selections - . flock of excellent centers and a flash-
places on the first team, with two for the complete squad. Minnesota .rwanger, as a matter of cold sta- ing array of backs. Injuries cut
each coming from the Southeastern and Prindeton each place three men. tistical fact, can do many more short the all-America chances of the
and Southwest Conference groups. There are two each from the ranks things well than Grange, such as year's best all-around backfield men,
Big Ten football furnishes three se- of Southern Methodist, Texas Chris- kicking, blocking and tackling, in ad- Andy James Pilney of Notre Dame.
lections on behalf of the Middle West. tian, Rice Institute, Stanford and dition to bali-cap rying and passing. Pilney or the ove-
The astandFarWes eah pace owa i-arringan assng.Pilney set the stage for the over-
The East and Far West each placelIowa. The sturdy boy from Dubuque has throw of Ohio State.
two men. h sThree players stand out as just rounded out three seasons of play
ead gai about the unanimous choice of the during which he gained more than MactPgan a nd Bl ehneraof
Taking the all-star squad of 33 as a !country for All-America recognition. a mile from scrimmage, completed Michigan are both on the honorable
whole, with little too choose in many Two of them, Stanford's Bobby Gray- 51 out of 148 passes, averaged 37.4 ern Conference men coming in for
instances among piayers on any of j yards at punting, scored 22 touch-em Cnrncmncoignfr
tnesreetams, eSothaganyisIson, as fullback, and Captain Darrell yds n teuxtrs ointsuand higher rating. Widseth and Beise
the hreeteam, i~e Soth aain s t downs, booted 20 extra points and of -Minnesota and Simmons of Iowa
in the lead with 12 performers from Lester, Texas Christian's giant center, otherwise managed almost single- areMines nd Simmons oflIoa
three major conferences. The Middle won their all-America spurs last year handed to lift a Chicago team with Wagner of Michigan State.
West is next with 10, also represent- and demonstrated all this season that lmited manpower out of the Big Ten
ing an increase over 1934. The East they belong at the read of the class. ruck. Western Conference critics put
gains seven places but the Far West Ehy blos th greado he cndss Berwanger in the-hallowed class with
has to be satisfied with only four. a Each rose to great heights under j Eckersall, Heston, Harley, Martineau'
new "low" for the Pacific Coast sec- pressure. The third is John Jacob and other famous all-around backs
tor, which had a corner on all-Amer- (Jay) Berwanger, famous as Chi- of Big Ten history. Undoubtedly he
ica talent several years ago. cago's "one-man backfield" and with- belongs there.h7000
-~ _---_ --=-===-- --=- ---fi-- - The somewhat limited supply of - -
- ~~~~~~~~~first-class ends or guards of all-_________________

many a distinguished athletic son
the old alma mater.

of

Big Ten Has Three
This year's selections, based upon
a consensus of expert views and opin-
ions in all parts of the nation, reflect
he sensational strides made on
southern gridirons, particularly in
Texas. The far-flung battleground
3f Dixie, stretching from the Caro-
linas to the Lone Star State, shares
with the equally copious Middle West
the distinction of developing a bum-
per crop of all-America performers
in the 1935 campaign. Simultane-
Prep Mentors
Meet Today To
Discuss Rules
The twelfth annual rules interpre-
tation committee of Michigan High
School basketball coaches meets here
today to consider the present cage
rules in an attempt to modify them in
such a way so as to improve the game
for both the player and spectator.
In addition to the coaches coming
here today there will be several hun-
dred prep school cagers who also will
watch the demonstration of how the
new rules operate.
The rule prohibiting a man from
remaining in the foul circle more
than three seconds has not been fa-
vored by many high school coaches
thus far this season and it is expected
that this rule will be disgarded today.
The program for the day follows:
10:00 a.m., Demonstration of Fig-
ure 8 offense by St. Augustine team
of Kalamazoo. Defense formations
by Northwestern High of Detroit at
Yost Field.
Noon: Luncheon, Lloyd Olds, Mich-
igan Normal Track coach will ad-
dress the meeting.
2:00 p.m., Annual discussion and
rules interpreting meeting at Hill
Auditorium.
7:30 p.m., Players and Coaches
guests at Michigan. Michigan Nor-
mal basketball game at Yost Field
House.

! I,_______

I
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i

FOR THAT
DIFFICULT- T-SEL ECT
Christrnas Gf
One gift you can be sure will always be acceptable,
one that is always appreciated, is a box of Prekete's.
HOME-MADE CANDY
done up in all sore of attractive gift packages.
PR K ETE'S SUGAN SRTWL
109 SOUTH MAIN STREET.

. II

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XMAS GIFTS
A RADIO WOULD MAKE
THE IDEAL PRESENT FOR
THE ENTIRE FAMILY-
PH I LCO and SPARTON
Purchase aio Service

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1111

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FOR A CHRISTMAS GIFT:
GARGOYLE
and ILIFE
$1.2 5 for Seven Months
Mailed Anywhere
Except INDIA and ETHIOPIA
Send Checks and Addresses
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Phone 8696

OPEN

EVENINGS 331 S. Main

r-'

BOSTON SYMPHONY

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ORCHE STIRA
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor
11( PLAYERS 110

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