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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 07, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN D)ATYZ

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1938'

Public Meeting
Called On Train
Discontinuance
Chamber Of Commerce Is
Sponsor Of Protest To
MichiganCentral
The transportation committee of
the Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce
will hold a public meeting today to
discuss the possibility of persuading
the Michigan Central Railroad to
continue its commuting gasoline
coach on the Ann Arbor-Detroit run.
The railroad company recently an-
nounced its intention of discontinu-
ing the service Dec. 14.
Many residents who have their
business offices in Detroit and several
University faculty members use the
special coach constantly, Chamber of-
ficials stated, and it is to the advan-
tage of the community to see that
this service is continued, they said.
The service was obtained more than
a year ago. It was estimated that
an average of eight or nine persons
use it daily, and at times the number
reaches 12.
It was contended by the Michigan
Central office that fewer people use
the train, and that the limited pat-
ronage forces them to run it at a loss.
The coach leaves Ann Arbor every
moning at 7:45 and 11:15.
Raymond Spokes, chairman of the
tansportation committee, has con-
ferred with executives of the New
York Central Railroad, of which the
Michigan Central is a subsidy, while
in New York on business. It is ex-
pected that he will return in time to
speak at the meeting.
Guard Bremen
At Dock After
Red Plot Scare
Friend Of Official 'Hears'
That Anti-Nazis Planned
To Hurl Bomb At Ship
NEW YORK, Dec. 6.-The North
German Lloyd liner Bremen, pride
of the Nazi merchant marine and
one of the largest and fastest boats
in the North Atlantic trade, came
ino port today under extraordinary
guard.
The marine superintendent of the
line had heard from a friend that
Communists allegedly had plotted to
explode a bomb aboard her. Com-
munists and other anti-Nazi organi-
zations staged a demonstration
aboard her July 26 in which sev-
eral were injured and her Nazi flag
was torn from its halyards and
thrown into the Hudson.
The Bremen reached quarantine
last night and w.as met by the coast
guard cutters Calumet and Icarus,
two smaller coast guard boats, and a
police launch. They stood by the
great liner all night and escorted her
up the harbor to her pier this morn-
ing. Police said the usual heavy
guard, maintained since the first riot
that brought protests from the Ger-
man government, would be augment-
ed by three sergeants and 45 pa-
trolmen.
The liner was said to have in her
holds $18,000,000 in gold consigned to
New York banks, but police said no
plot to steal her gold was suspected.
TEXTILE EXPERT TO TALK
Mrs. Adele C. Weibel, curator of
textiles at the Detroit Institute of
Arts, will speak on "Islamic Textiles"

at 4:15 p.m. Monday, in Room D of
Alumni Memorial Hall. The lecture
is the second in the "Near Eastern
Art and Culture" series being spon-
sored by the Research Seminary in
Islamic Art of the University.

OGPU Methods Are Utilized
in Checking Grads' Activities
Cto keep an up-to-the-minute account'
Creation Of Class Council of his fellow alumni's doings.
Aids Office In Work Of The increasing importance of class
.ag uorganizations is revealed in the fact
Contacting Alumni that the last three presidents of the
Alumni Association have been class
By WILLIAM DELANCEY officers. These are Emory Hyde, '04L,
With the efficiency but not the ul- now president, the late G. Carl Huber,
terior motives of the Russian OGPU, '87M, Dean of the Graduate School,
the Alumni office combines the ten- and Hastings.
acity of Scotland Yard with the Among the outstanding secretaries,
thoroughness of the Secret Service according to Morgan, are Prof. Her-
to follow the activities of, University bert Goulding, '93, Ann Arbor; Wil-
graduates. lam C. Michaels, '95L, Kansas City;
Like all good things, Gaul of an- Miss Dorothy Roehm, '15, Detroit; C.
cient times and the Federal govern- L. Converse, 'OOL; Harry Nutt, '96E,
ment of today, the Alumni Office's Ann Arbor; and William L. Hart,
work is divided into three parts. Men '97L. A picturesque combination of
and women who have graduated (or class officers was the "twin duo" of
at any time attended) the University the Class of 1883. In office for 52
are contacted either by the Alumnus years, Frederick Arbury, six feet two
of the weekly publication, by clubs, inches, secretary, and John Winship,
or by class organizations. A reor- five feet two inches, president, be-
ganization was effected in 1922 which came almost a trade mark of that
created clubs, combining all classes in class. The regime was ended recent-
one locality, as the main method of ly by the death of Arbury.
approach to the alumni. T. Hawley Classes have often identified them-
Tapping, alumni secretary, now di- selves to the University by making
rects the club activities. gifts ranging from rocks to loan
The Class Officers' Council was or- funds. Material representations,
iTinated Ca1927 cer' until w o-such as railings and benches, are
tary action on te pamf cla s secr becoming less common as classes
taries. According to Robert O. Mor- have adopted the practice of creating
gan, Council secretary, this system student loan funds. Representative
ganCoucil ecrtary ths sytemof the early birth of this activity is
carries an almosticomplete coverage the friendly quarrel between Shirley
of all graduate activities. Smith '98, secretary and vice-presi-
Under the present plan the presi- dent of the University, and Prof. J.
dent of each senior class appoints a Raleigh Nelson, '94, as to whose class
permanent secretary of the group be- bestowed the first loan fund upon the
fore the graduation activities take University.
place. Officers of present senior The Alumni Association has placed
lasses are now being interviewed in its stamp of approval on the plan of
she Alumni Office, Morgan stated. E. J. Ottaway for a "10-year plan" for
In the words of a former Council gifts. Created to promote more unity
secretary, the secretary is the "key and magnitude to the gift-making
man ofthe class." "The class is just process, the 10-year plan aims at the
as strong as its secretary," he stated, creation of such funds as that of the
kiting the extent of the secretary's University of Michigan Club of New
infiuence in completely setting the York City. This fund is utilized in
mood for a reunion. Secretaries the support of professorships.
ontact members of their classes in
zany ways, ranging from aristocratic , .
.orm letters to personal correspond- instance T o frca
once. Some of the more energetic of-
icers devote their vacations personal- A Mere 'Walk' For
y interviewing class members.
Elaborate file systems contain such A A M" t0. -r R sdir FAn7td

Classified Directory

Indiana Approves
Extradition Pact
LANSING, Dec. 6. - (A) - Indianaj
became the first state in the union
today to approach Michigan parole
authorities on a plan for the recip-
rocal return of parole violators with-
out extradition proceedings.

ger discuss the proposed compact
tween the two states with Parole
Commissioner Joseph C. Armstrong.
Under the proposed agreement state
parole officers would supervise the
conduct of parolees from their neigh-
bor state and permit them to be ex-
tradited across state borders without
formal hearings. The arrangement
m a.-. nnrrnic.i.,nhk rr .n t Wnro 1

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
Place advertisements with Classified
Advertising Department.Phoie 2121-ii
The classified columns closeratnfive
o'clock previous to day of insertion.
Box numbers may be secured at nc
extra charge.
cash in advance 11c per reading line
(on basis of five average words to
line) for one or two insertions.
i0c per reading line for three or more
Minimum 3 lines per insertion.
relephone rate - 15c perreading line
for two or more insertions.
Minimum three lines per insertion.
10% discount if paid within ten days
from the date of last insertion.-
By contract, per line- 2 lines daily, one1
month......................Be
41 macs E.O.D., 2 months........Bc
2 lines daily, college year........7c
4 lines E.O.D., 2 months ..........8c
100 lines used as desired..........9c
300 lines used as desired..........B
1,000 lines used as desired .........7c
2,000 lines used as desired........6c
The above rates are per reading line,
based on eight reading lines per inch.
conic type, upper and lower case. Acd
Sc per line to above rates for all capital
letters. Add 6c per line to above for
bold face, upper and lower case. Add i0c
per line to above rates for bold face
capital letters.
The above rates are for 712 point
type.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Pi Beta Phi sorority pin on
campus. Finder please return to
Edith Merickel. Phone 7526. 156
LOST: Small book concerning his-
tory of Congregational Church.
Louisa Sheldon, Kingsley Apart-
ments. Phone 2-2614. 153
War Film Will
BeDisplayed At
Union Monday,

LAUNDRY
STUDENT HAND LAUNDRY: Prices
reasonable. Free delivery. Phone
3006. 6x
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. Ix 1
WANTED
WANTED: Galoshes with worn heels
to re-cap. College Shoe Repair
Shop. Call 6898. 152
CLOTHING WANTED TO BUY. Any
old and new suits, overcoats at $3
to $20. Don't sell before you see
Sam. Phone for appointments.
2-3640. lox
NOTICES
MAC'S TAXI-4289. Try our effi-
cient service. All new cabs. 3x
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Large single room on
first floor. Private lavatory in room.
1109 Willard. 154
FOR RENT: Furnished heated apart-
ment; living room, dining room,
bedroom, kitchenette, bath. Suit-
able for three or four adults.
Swezey, 513 Thompson. 155
FOR GRADUATE student or instruc-
tor, beautifully furnished suite of
rooms in private family. Phone
9524. 147
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Tuxedo including vest.
Size 38. Hardly been worn. Will
practically give this away. 157
- -

The 1935 legislature enacted a law !ir
permitting Michigan to enter com- leg
pacts with other states for the mutual
,u veillance of parolees. John H.
Klinger, secretary of Gov. Paul V.
McNutt, of Indiana, conferred with
Deputy Attorney General James F.
Shepherd on a tentative compact.
Shepherd recommended that Klin-

iate pe
Islation.

xmissive oy recent r-eaerai

F= -

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LAST TIME TODAY
Gary Cooper "The Virginian"
"Personal Maid's Secret"
Buck Jones "Roaring West"
Chapter 1
SUNDAY - MONDAY - TUESDAY
JOE E. BROWN
"BRIGHT LIGHTS"
and FRANCIS LEDERER
"GAY DECEPTION"
MICKEY MOUSE CARTOON
"PLUTO'S JUDGMENT DAY"

ART CINEMA LEAGUE
presents
The International Success
in Uniform"
with English Titles
The famous picture of life in a
German girls' school, based on
the play and novel by Christia
Winsloe.
Lydia MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
TONIGHT AT 8:15
Tickets 35c
All Seats Reserved

L 1

RISTMASCARDS
Imprinted with your name. One-day service.
1 2 Cards 75c and up. . . 24 Cards $1.00 and up.
A large and choice assortment in a complete
range of prices.
314 South State Street

'All Quiet On
Front' Brought
Dr. Onderdonk

Western
Here By

information as the graduate's oc-
upation, clubs, civic recognition,
wife's and children's names, and pay-
nent of class dues. Donald Hastings,
07L, a past president of the Council,
.tilizes an extensive visible card file
system to keep track of the men in
his class. John T. Moffit, '86L, a
district judge in Iowa, also manages
Potts Appointed
Secretary For
TrafficS qrad
The appointment of Prof. Philip O.
Potts of the engineering college. as
corresponding secretary of the new
Citizens Traffic Squad, was an-
nounced at a luncheon held Thursday
by that organization. The squad,
which now numbers 36 members, will
begin its activities next week.
A similar group in Detroit is being
used as a model for the squad, which
hopes to reduce traffic tolls by a cam-
paign in which violators will be sent
courteous letters apprising them of
their offences. Members will be given
no police powers, but in the event of
a serious accident, a report will be
made to the police department at the
discretion of the secretary, W. M.
Strickland. An effort will be made
to secure additional members through
presenting the plan to various Ann
Arbor service clubs and through re-
cruiting by present members.
New members will be accepted only
if they are "responsible, capable and
have the best interests of the organi-
zation at heart," Mr. Strickland said.
He urged the cooperation of all in
the new program.

Africa and Ann Arbor, though geo-
graphically estranged, have been very
close to each other through radio
communication during the past year.
The local participant in this rela-
tionship is Dr. John D. Kraus, 30, an
amateur radio operator and the son
of Dean Edward H. Kraus of the lit-
erary college. The story of this un-
usual relationship is contained in the
latest Michigan Alumnus.
The operator in Africa with whom
Kraus has been communicating is a
Presbyterian missionary from Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., who until lately has
been unable to reach any other sta-
tion in the United States besides
Kraus. Since the first chance hook-
up with Kraus, this relationship has
proved most fortunate to the mis-
sionary, for mail service in and out
of the Congo is painfully slow. Sevenj
weeks are required for a letter to
reach the Congo from the Tennessee
headquarters.
Even the most urgent cablegrams
cannot be delivered in less than two
days, for that is the time it takes a
native runner to covel' the distance
from the mission to the cable office,
the article states.
This transmission of messages by
radio from the missionary location
1,500 miles inland from the African
west coast and five degrees south of
the equator, to Ann Arbor, 7,000 miles
distant, worked effectively for some
months.

"All Quiet on the Western Front,"
the war picture whose showing caused
such a furor in Europe and the United
States two years ago, will be shown at
8 p.m. Monday in Room 316, Michigan
Union, by Dr. Francis Onderdonk,
peace lecturer. The showing is free
to the general public, and is sponsored
by the League of Nations Association.
The 11-reel film is, according to Dr.
Onderdonk, apparently more com-
plete than the version first shown at
most theatres. It is a silent film pro-
duced by Universal, with titles in-
serted. Dr. Onderdonk will give a
running comment and explanatory
remarks during the showing.
"This film is probably the mos''
fought-over of all films made," Dr.
Onderdonk stated yesterday. "In
Germany the Nazis staged riots when
it was shown during the days of the
Weimar republic, letting loose mice,
snakes and malodorous bombs in the
elegant Berlin theatres where it was
shown, with Dr. Goebbels delivering
inflammatory speeches to the crowd
outside the theatre.
"In Vienna likewise, riots occurred,
and only after the intervention of the
American minister did the police as-
sure undisturbed performances," Dr.
Onderdonk said.
AUTO DRIVING COURSE
STANTON, Dec. 6. - (R') - Tenta-
tive plans for a school course in au-
tomobile operation, which young per-
sons would be required to pass to ob-
tain a driver's license, were disclosed
here yesterday at a sixth district
American Legion meeting.

FOR SALE: Typewriter, portable,
noiseless, Underwood. Model sev-
enty-seven. Long return bar, tab-
ular key, lists $77.50. Perfect
shape. Sacrifice, sells under half-i
price. 158
SAVE 20%
"WATCH ES
The TIME SHOP
1121 So. University Ave.

H. B. WARNER
"Born To Gamble"

JOHN WAYNE
"Westward Ho"

Last Times Today

e

a

WHITNEY

15c TO 6 P.M.

25c AFTER 6

r

-Starting Sunday
Edward Everett PAU L MU N I
Horton
in --
"H IS NIGHT OUT" "BLACK FURY"

L

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EXTRA

"On Your Radio Dial" Latest News

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ero

Saturday Matinee ........ 25c
M A JES I CSaturday Evening, All Seats, 35c
Sunday Matinee until 2 P.M. 25c
Thereafter .............. 35c
TODAY ! SEE THIS

Religious Activities

II

Last time today
This complete
Stage and Screen
Show Plays

MICHIGAN
HERE IN PERSON!
The Famous Carioca Orchestra
from "Flying Down To Rio"
/j MARCOS
D AVA OS
MARIMBA BAND
with
The International Dance Stars
DON, RALPH & NINA
EXOTIC NATIVE 16
RHYTHM RHUMBA ARTISTS
SCREEN
MAY ROBSON
in the Unusual Comedy Drama
"TH REE KIDS
a 81U EN

PICTURE WITH SOMEONE
YOU LOVE !

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
at the MASONIC TEMPLE
327 South Fourth
Ministers:
William P. Lemnon
and Norman W. Kunkel
9:45 - Dr. Lemon leads the West-
minster Forum. Subject: "'The
Essence of Religion."
210:45 -- Morning Service. Dr. Lem-
on's Subject:
"THE MAKING OF GOD'S
GENTLEMAN"
5:30 - Fellowship Hour with cost
subject:
6:30 - Westminsrer Guild. Dean
W. DHenderson speaker on the
subjects:
"HUMAN NATURE AND
THE BIBLE"

Professor Pauck
Lydia Mendelssohn
8 P.M. - Sunday
"The Relation of
Church & State in
Nazi Germany"

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
State and Washington Streets
MINISTERS:
CHARLES W. BRASHARES
and L. LaVERNE FINCH
Music : Achilles Tahiaferro
0:45 a.m. - Morning Worship Ser-
vice.
"BOOK OF BOOKS"
Dr. Brashares
12:00 Noon --Class at Stalker Hall
on2-
"The Social Responsibility
Of A Christian"
led by Prof. Lowell J. Carr.
6:00 p.m. - Wesleyan Guild Prof.
Bennatt Weaver will speak on
"LITERATURE"
at Stalker Hall. Supper and
fellowship hour follow.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Roger Williams Guild
R. EDWARD SAYLES and
HOWARD R. CHAPMAN, Ministers
10:4R a.m. -
"THE MARTYR PROPHET"

DGNOT
NEGLECrl

HILLEL FOUNDATION
Corner East University and Oakland
Dr. Bernard Heller, Director
10:00 A.M. - Sunday School.
'7.45 P .T .-- S,, ia ci,, n ina Forum n-

iii I , E ILn E U I. ETU- .. UU EI lu

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