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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1935 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIHE M ICI GAN I AILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1935

Find Long-Lost
Copies Of Early
Abolition Organ
History Department At
Last Completes Anti-
Slavery Newspaper Files
Completion of long-lost parts of
the file of the Signal of Liberty, Ann
Arbor anti-slavery newspaper of the
1840's was announced yesterday by
Prof. Lewis G. VanderVelde, who
heads the history department's
Michigan history collection program.
The long-missing issues, those pub-
lished between 1843 and 1845, were
unearthed by Arthur Raymond Kook-
er, Professor VanderVelde's assistant
in the program working on a tip from
Dr. George N. Fuller, secretary of the
Michigan Historical Commission.
Some time ago, on Kooker's request,
Dr. Fuller published in the Commis-
sion's Michigan History Magazine a
notice asking for information of anti-
slavery material. As a result of this,
Kooker learned of the existence of
the issues in Schoolcraft.
The issues were loaned to the Uni-
versity by Malcolm Thomas, '80, son
of Dr. Nathan Thomas, a pioneer
Kalamazoo county physician and ac-
tive anti-slavery leader. In addition
to the copies of the Signal of Liberty,
Kooker obtained 200 valuable docu-
ments, some of which were letters,
bearing on the anti-slavery move-
ment. Also in the material was a
complete file of the Michigan Free-
man, anti-slavery organ published
at Jackson, and which preceded the
Signal of Liberty; and a rare copy of
the Michigan Liberty Press, the only
one known to University historians,
which was the successor to the Signal.
This paper was published in Battle
Creek during 1848 by Erastus Hussey,
noted anti-slavery agitator.
Professor VanderVelde, in praising
he materials as "a great advance in
our collection," pointed out that the
aid of Dr. Fuller was of great help.
Professor VanderVelde also obtained
valuable material on Michigan his-
tory recently near Hastings, where
he went in search of newspaper files.
The history department is locating
materials on Michigan history, and
when possible collecting them for the
University. The program was initiat-
ed last spring, when it received the
praise of President Alexander G.
Ruthven. "The University is the ideal
and logical place for such material,"
the president said.
Discuss Cleopatra
With Caesar-He'll
Reveal Everything
"Mars? Mars? - I'd like to speak
to Abraham Lincoln."
And to the reporter a few minutes
later --"Abe's here now. Quick,
what do you want me to ask him?'
"Ask him when he made his Get-
tysburg Address."
And then the elderly gentleman
placed his hand on a blank paper,
held the pencil loosely in his hand,
and "let" spiritualism take its course.
In shaky, jaggy lines the pencil wrote
"March 20." (Lincoln actually made
his famous speech on November 19.)
"That's it. 'Abe woud know. And
I tell you, I can speak to anybody on
any planet. You see, everyone that
dies goes to one of the planets. You
can talk to any of them. I and
George Washington have had many
conversations."
John H. Fisher, 88, of 1208 Roose-.
velt Avenue, was the man who was

discussing things with Lincoln. He
explained it all "beacuse he wants to
get this thing started so everyone
can have as good a time as I do."
The first thing one must do is get
in the mood. You'll then get an
answer. He'll shake your head "yes"
or "no." If you have a paper and
pencil, just hold your hand limp and
your friend from Mars will move your
hand around to answer the question.
"On the sun they have no govern-
ments," he said. "But they do have
great schools and the people are be-
coning enlightened fast."
And then - this is perhaps his big-
gest selling point - the people up
there don't wear clothes. So he
thinks.
LEGIONAIRES RALLY
CADILLAC, Sept. 30.-(P)-Four
hundred western Michigan legionaires
returned to their homes today after
a week-end rally here at which they
heard speeches from Representative
Albert J. Engel, Lake City, and R. J.
Vanden Berge, Highland Park, com-
mander of the Michigan department
of the American Legion.

Religious Councelor

DR. EDWARD W. BLAKEMAN
* ~ *
Understanding
Among Campus
Faiths Is Sought
Dr. Blakeman To Discuss
'Human Relations' Plans.
In MeetingAt Union
In opening his activities for the
year, Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, coun-
selor in Religious Education, will meet
in the Union with a student group
to discuss the Williamstown Insti-
tute of Human Relations, held at Wil-
liams College, which he attended from
August 25 to August 30.
The Institute was attended by 650
Jews, Catholics and Protestants,;
headed by such notable persons as
Newton D. Baker, Father A. C. Riggs
of Yale, Tyler Dennet of Williams,
Robert McElroy of Oxford, England,
and Dr. I. M. Rubinow. Reports were
read upon religious education in uni-
versities, Church questions, Jews,
and Lutheran difficulties in Ger-
many, Catholic distress in Mexico and
vigilante movements against religious
and racial minorities.
"A strong desire was registered that
sectional sub-Institutes be devel-
oped.," Dr. Blakeman said.
Dr. Blakeman will announce defi-
nite plans for the coming year after
he has conferred with his faculty
committee and members of the stu-
dent religious organizations on the
campus. With his information con-
cerning the student body augmented
by the results of a questionnaire given'
out to freshmen at the beginning!
of the semester, Dr. Blakeman pre-
dicts that his work of creating under-
standing between the many faiths
represented on the campus will serve3
a wide constituency.
500 Freshmen
Welcomed At
Union Smoker
More than 500 incoming students
attended the annual freshman smoker
sponsored by the Union Thursday
night as a part of the orientation
week activities of the new men.
The purpose of the mixer was to
give the freshmen an opportunity
to find out how to enter the various
extra-curricular activities as well as
to acquaint them with the student
leaders in the student organizations.
Wencel A. Neumann, '36, president
of the Union, presided over the
smoker. The Glee Club and the "Four
Men of Note," a student quartet
composed of members of the Glee
Club, opened the program and led
the group in a mass sing.
The representatives of the different
activities were introduced by Neu-
mann. Those who appeared on the
program were: Don Miller, '36, editor
of the Gargoyle; William Wilsnack;
'38, president of the S.C.A.; Thomas
H. Kleene, '36, editor of The Daily;
William Dixon, '36, president of the
Men's Council; John McCarthy, '36,
recording secretary of the Union;
Frank Fehsenfeld, '36, member of the
Board in Control of Athletics; George
Williams, '36, president of the Inter-
fraternity Council; and William Mc-
Fate, '36, editor of the 'Ensian.
LOWEST PRICES
PROGRAMS, BIDS, STATIONERY

THE ATHENS PRESS
Downtown, North of Postoffice

Ann Arbor Gets
W. P. A. Grants
For New Schools
President Approves Plan
To Construct Addition
To HighSchool
A $130,500 allotment to Ann Arbor
schools was included in the WPA
grant of $1,333,21, approved yester-
day for Michigan by President Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt.
The money will go toward construc-
tion of a four-story addition to Ann
Arbor high school, according to Otto
W. Haisley, superintendent, but will
not be all used. The amount repre-
sents approximately 45 per cent of
the $300,000 estimated in original
plans.
The board of education, Mr. Hais-
ley said, will soon submit an amended
plan calling for a $120,000 expendi-
ture, 45 per cent of which, $54,000,
will be supplied by the government.
This move was decided on, according
to the superintendent, in hope of
having approved a project calling for
a new junior high school on the
west side.
The allotments approved by the
President included $45,454 for the
Pinckney schools.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.-(/P) -
Funds totaling $1,333,291 have been
approved by President Roosevelt for
WPA projects in Michigan, it was an-
nounced today by the division of ap-
plications. Included in the list of
projects, which are subject to ap-
proval by the comptroller general,
are:
Benzie county: Community service
program in Beulah, $6,714; construct
sewer and manholes in Elberta, $21,-
496.
Grand Traverse county: Improve
county road, $23,425.
Ingham county: Community serv-
ice program at Michigan State col-
lege, $11,196.
Ottawa county; Improve streets in
Grand Haven, $3,250.
Wayne county: Community service
program in Detroit, $18,165; repairs
in Detroit public schools, $1,071,873.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.- (P) -
The Public Works administration an-
nounced today approval by Prsident
Roosevelt of allotments of $8,086,-
783 for 89 projects in Michigan.
PWA Administrator Ickes instruct-
ed Mortimer E. Cooley, acting PWA
director for Michigan, that allotments
were made on the showing and pledge
of the applicants that the President's
stipulations as to cost, employment
and construction schedule would be
met, and legal, financial, and engi-
neering requirements fulfilled.
Grants totaling $4,881,601 were
made from the $4,880,000,000 works
relief appropriation to cover 45 per
cent of the cost of all projects. Loans
totaling $3,205,182 for 61 projects
were made to, the applicants. On
compliance with requirements these
loans will be available from the PWA
revolving fund.
The allotments still are subject to
approval by the comptroller general.
Tryouts Desired For
Women's Business Staff
Tryouts for positions on the
Women's Business Staff >of The
Daily are invited to report at the
Student Publications Building on
Maynard Street at 5 p.m. today,
it was announced by Elizabeth
Simonds, '36, women's business
manager.
Any students who have been on

campus more than one semester
and, who have satisfactory schol-
astic standings are eligible to try
out.
Lj
NEW ALL-PURPOSE
REMI NGTON
PORTABLE

Harry Thaw Comes Home In Wheelchair

Plans Discussed
By S.C.A. Cabinet
The cabinet of the Student Chris-
tian Association held its first meet-
ing of the year during the past week
end at the University Fresh Air Camp
grounds at Patterson Lake. William
Wilsnack, '37, president of the S.C.A.,
called the meeting to discuss plans
and policy for the year.
The Y.M.C.A. secretary for thes

SCHLENKER SPECIALS
Clothes Hampers .... .....$1.25 Quick Drying Enamel. .. $1.25 qt.
Laundry Basket on Legs ....:.59c Quick drying Floor enamel 95c qt.
No. 8 Dutch Oven...........98c Ironing Board ...........$1.89
No. 8 Cast Spider ........... 49c Cocoa Door Mats ...........79c
Bronze Weather Stripping .................. $3.00 per hundred feet
SCHLENKER HARDWARE COMPANY
213-215 West Liberty Street Phone 8575

Central Region attended and assisted
in planning the program for the com-
ing year. Dr. E. W. Blakeman, re-
ligious counselor for students, also
was in attendance and aided in the
planning of the different events.
It is expected that the program of
the S.C.A. will continue much along
the lines of the program of the or-
ganization for last year. During the
year several forums featuring outside
speakers.

-Associated Press Photo.
The once dapper Harry K. Thaw, defendant in the most sensational
murder case in the early years of the century, is shown as he was
wheeled from Grand Central station, New York, without a tie, his shoes
unlaced and a tag on his overcoat, to a hotel. Thaw was taken from a
liner at Quebec a few days ago seriously ill.
Union Activities For This Year
Outlined By President Neumann

U. of M. STUDENTS
The Mayflower Restaurant Extends
A HEARTY WELCOME TO YOU
An Exclusive Restaurant Service
For Your Approval.
Mayflower Restaurant
Corner of Liberty and Fourth

---

Plans for student activities which
will be sponsored by the Union dur-
ing the current school year were
briefly outlined last night by Wencel
A. Neumann, '36, president of the
Union. Many new features have been
added to the Union program, and a'
few improvements have been made
in the facilities of the Union build-
ing.
The regular Union membership
dances willabe held every week-end,
but it is planned to sponsor a floor
show and to stage several novelty
skits at each dance. Neumann stated
that after the Union Formal, which
will be held in the latter part of Oc-
tober, it is planned to bring in sev-
eral outstanding dance bands on an
average of about once a month.
In response to the student poll con-
ducted last spring, the periodicals of
the Pendleton Library have been
changed to suit the tastes of the stu-
dents. The "Book of the Month"
feature will again be sponsored.
During the football season the in-
formation desk and a campus guide
service will be offered by the Union,
and later in the fall the annual Open'
House will be held. A ticket exchange
service will be sponsored to serve
as a place where people may buy and
sell football tickets.
Neumann emphasized the necessity
of registering as soon as possible for
membership, for he stated that stu-

dents were going to be asked to pre-
sent membership cards more than in
previous years. Those who avail
themselves of the privileges of the
swimming pool will be required to
present cards for use of the new
steam room which is exclusively for
students, he added. Students who
wishto do so may take swimming les-
sons free of charge in the Union pool,
and John Schmeiler, '33, will be avail-
able six days a week for those wish-
ing instruction.
The student-faculty program will
begin immediately following the
closing of the rushing period, and on
three successive Wednesdays fresh-
men will have an opportunity to meet
and talk with members of the fac-
ulty. Neumann stated that it was not
decided as yet whether the faculty-
fraternity program of last year would
be carried on.
Tournaments in billiards, ping-
pong, and bowling will start very soon
Neumann stated, and announcements
for registration will appear in The
Daily.

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11

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